In Forward and Reverse: Understanding Zoonosis—Michelle Power—Department of Biological Sciences at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia


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Jul 06 2020 31 mins  
Associate Professor Michelle Power discusses her expertise in the study of host-parasite associations in wildlife, with particular emphasis on protozoan parasites. Tune in to discover: What differentiates the two main classes of resistant bacteria and why this has important implications for humans, and potentially wildlife Why it is important to think about the many interactions within organisms relative to disease (i.e. the context of coinfection) rather than thinking about only about one host and one pathogen at a time What important ecological role flying foxes play in Australia The flying fox (i.e. fruit bat) is one of the world’s largest bats, and in Sydney, Australia, thousands of them can be found hanging from the trees in even the most urbanized parts of the city. Most of us are familiar with the idea that viruses can be transferred from these and other animals to humans, but what can be said about how the process might work in the opposite direction? In other words, what types of parasites and bacteria may be picked up by bats and other wildlife as the result of humans in their environment? These questions involve the concept of reverse zoonosis, which comprises one of Power’s primary research interests. She and the research team in the biology department at Macquarie University work on a suite of different organisms, most of which are associated with the gut, such as cryptosporidium and giardia. Both of these parasites are transmissible through the water and can therefore travel through the environment. As a result, they can be picked up by wildlife through drinking water or through interactions during rehabilitation and/or long-term captivity. Power is also researching malarial parasites and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a global health concern for humans that may or may not be making its way into wildlife. Check out https://researchers.mq.edu.au/en/persons/michelle-power to learn more. Available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/2Os0myK