Nationalism Course podcast

Nov 19 2020 56 mins 125

Professor of Politics, Birkbeck College, University of London. This podcast focuses on nationalism, ethnicity and religion, and their interaction with immigration and population change. Also issues of academic freedom and left-modernism.







































































Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities
Nov 26 2018 96 mins  
This event hosted by Birkbeck on 15 November 2018 focused on and around topics from Eric Kaufmann's new book Whiteshift. The book argues that we need to talk about white identity if we hope to address the root causes of populism and polarisation. The West is in the midst of two epochal demographic transformations. First, the white share of the population is projected to drop to less than half the total by 2050 in North America and 2100 in Western Europe. Second, the mixed-race population is projected to rise exponentially late this century to form the majority in western countries by the early 2100s. The first phase of Whiteshift, which we are currently in, increases the existential insecurity of conservative whites and emboldens the cosmopolitan left, with its dream of radical cultural transformation. Left-liberal hegemony in the high culture and its attempt to stanch the expression of conservative anxieties in established institutions has delegitmated the cultural elite in the eyes of conservatives, opening space for right-wing populism and 'culture wars' polarisation. The advent of mass racial melting offers a way out of this impasse, if we are able to grasp it. Panellists discussed aspects of the theme of 'Right-Wing Populism and the Left' alongside Kaufmann's new book. PANELLISTS Eric Kaufmann is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck and author of the forthcoming Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration and the Future of White Majorities (Penguin Allen Lane, 25 October, 2018) Munira Mirza was Deputy Mayor for Education and Culture of London. She is author of The Politics of Culture: The Case for Universalism (2012). Trevor Phillips, writer and broadcaster, was formerly head of the Commission for Racial Equality and the Equality and Human Rights Commission. John Judis, author of a new book The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization (2018) and The Populist Explosion (2016), an editor-at-large at Talking Points Memo, a former senior writer at The National Journal and a former senior editor at The New Republic. David Goodhart, author of The Road to Somewhere: the Populist Revolt and the Future of Politics (2017), and The British Dream. He was founding editor of Prospect magazine, was director of the think tank Demos and is currently Head of the Demography, Immigration and Integration Unit at the think tank Policy Exchange. CHAIR Robert Singh, Professor of Politics at Birkbeck will chair the event. Robert is is a specialist in contemporary US politics and the politics of American foreign policy. He is the author of eleven books - including, most recently, In Defense of the United States Constitution (Routledge, 2018)













The New Nationalism (LSE Inst Public Affairs/ASEN)30 Jan 2017
Feb 10 2017 99 mins  
Shortly after Trump’s victory, the Economist ran a cover story on ‘the New Nationalism.’ Professor Tony Travers of LSE chairs this event featuring an Economist editor and two experts on the populist right to ask, ‘Why the upsurge in nationalism?’ Richard Cockett (@CockettRichard) is an editor at The Economist who has written extensively on nationalism and immigration around the world for the newspaper Daphne Halikiopoulou is Associate Professor of Politics at the University of Reading and co-author of Golden Dawn’s ‘Nationalist Solution’: explaining the rise of the far right in Greece and numerous articles on radical right and left populism in Europe. She is an editor of the journal Nations and Nationalism. Eric Kaufmann (@epkaufm) is Professor of Politics at Birkbeck, University of London, author of The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America , Changing Places: the white British response to ethnic change and several LSE data blogs on the Brexit and Trump votes. He is an editor of the LSE based journal Nations and Nationalism. Tony Travers is the Director of LSE London and LSE’s Institute of Public Affairs. He is also a professor in the LSE’s Government Department. The Institute of Public Affairs (@LSEPubAffairs) is one of the world's leading centres of public policy. We aim to debate and address some of the major issues of our time, whether international or national, through our established teaching programmes, our research and our highly innovative public-engagement initiatives. This event will be co-sponsored by the LSE based Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism (ASEN).


The Challenge of Climate Change: What Can and Can't Be Fixed
Jan 21 2017 79 mins  
The Challenge of Climate Change: What Can and Can’t Be Fixed? A Roundtable discussion and reception launching the MSc in Global Environmental Politics and Policy, organised by the Birkbeck Population, Environment and Resources Group. Free event open to all: Book your place As we approach the 25th anniversary of the Rio Earth Summit in 2017, climate change continues to pose a formidable global socio-economic, political and environmental challenge. The latest Conference of Participants in Paris culminated with a multilateral commitment to keep global temperature rise this century below 2 degrees Celsius, promising an agreement with a ‘long-term vision’ that was also to act as an ‘engine of safe growth’. In this panel, we consider whether these aspirations to reconcile economic growth with control over global warming are realistic, feasible or even desirable. What are the prospects of enforcing these objectives? What kind of policies and political mobilisations might help to secure them? Can and does technology help in addressing climate change? And what are the implications of all this for an increasingly ‘crowded, complex and coastal’ planet? Four specialists on these subjects will discuss these and other related questions in an accessible and conversational format. Panelists: Aideen Foley, Lecturer in Physical and Environmental Geography Birkbeck College. Diane Horn, Reader in Coastal Geomorphology Birkbeck College. Eric Kaufmann, Professor of Politics, Birkbeck College. Nick Srnicek, co-author of Inventing the Future. Chair: Alex Colás, Reader in International Relations, Birkbeck College




Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict: questions
Jan 21 2017 24 mins  
Dr Paul Morland (Birkbeck) Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict with a response from Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange) Morland“All history is the history of ethnic conflict and in ethnic conflict numbers count.” With this bold statement, Paul Morland opens his new book which argues that ethnic conflict is pervasive across time and space and those with the weight of numbers on their side, either of soldiers or voters, have at the very least an important advantage and often a decisive one. It is therefore surprising that little thought has been given to demography in the context of ethnic conflict. Whilst some consideration has been paid to whether demography causes conflict – when and how particular demographic circumstances may trigger and shape wars and strife – little thinking has been given to how, once conflicts get going, groups use demography as part of their strategy or indeed pursue demography as a strategic goal. Morland offers a framework for thinking about political demography then uses it to illuminate four cases, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and the USA. The framework revolves around what he calls ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ demographic engineering. Hard demographic engineering involves creating, moving or destroying people, as with genocide, pronatalism and ethnically selective policies of immigration and emigration. By contrast, soft demographic engineering encompasses the movement of political or identity boundaries in order to incorporate or exclude. Examples of the hard form include the expatriation of ‘Indian’ Tamils in Sri Lanka, encouragement of Catholic emigration from Northern Ireland, the high birth rate of both Jews and Arabs in Israel / Palestine and the Back to Africa Movement in the United States. Examples of soft demographic engineering include the partition of Ireland, the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza and the selective annexation of conquered Mexican territory by the United States. Teasing out sources and supplementing the secondary record with interviews and archival work, Morland has thrown new light on the workings of ethnic conflict and offers an intriguing and fresh perspective on an important part of the way the world works, relevant for historians, geographers, social scientists and policy-makers alike.


Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict
Jan 21 2017 38 mins  
Dr Paul Morland (Birkbeck) Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict with a response from Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange) Morland“All history is the history of ethnic conflict and in ethnic conflict numbers count.” With this bold statement, Paul Morland opens his new book which argues that ethnic conflict is pervasive across time and space and those with the weight of numbers on their side, either of soldiers or voters, have at the very least an important advantage and often a decisive one. It is therefore surprising that little thought has been given to demography in the context of ethnic conflict. Whilst some consideration has been paid to whether demography causes conflict – when and how particular demographic circumstances may trigger and shape wars and strife – little thinking has been given to how, once conflicts get going, groups use demography as part of their strategy or indeed pursue demography as a strategic goal. Morland offers a framework for thinking about political demography then uses it to illuminate four cases, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and the USA. The framework revolves around what he calls ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ demographic engineering. Hard demographic engineering involves creating, moving or destroying people, as with genocide, pronatalism and ethnically selective policies of immigration and emigration. By contrast, soft demographic engineering encompasses the movement of political or identity boundaries in order to incorporate or exclude. Examples of the hard form include the expatriation of ‘Indian’ Tamils in Sri Lanka, encouragement of Catholic emigration from Northern Ireland, the high birth rate of both Jews and Arabs in Israel / Palestine and the Back to Africa Movement in the United States. Examples of soft demographic engineering include the partition of Ireland, the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza and the selective annexation of conquered Mexican territory by the United States. Teasing out sources and supplementing the secondary record with interviews and archival work, Morland has thrown new light on the workings of ethnic conflict and offers an intriguing and fresh perspective on an important part of the way the world works, relevant for historians, geographers, social scientists and policy-makers alike.



Introduction to Paul Morland Book talk on Demographic Engineering
Jan 21 2017 6 mins  
Dr Paul Morland (Birkbeck) Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict with a response from Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange) Morland“All history is the history of ethnic conflict and in ethnic conflict numbers count.” With this bold statement, Paul Morland opens his new book which argues that ethnic conflict is pervasive across time and space and those with the weight of numbers on their side, either of soldiers or voters, have at the very least an important advantage and often a decisive one. It is therefore surprising that little thought has been given to demography in the context of ethnic conflict. Whilst some consideration has been paid to whether demography causes conflict – when and how particular demographic circumstances may trigger and shape wars and strife – little thinking has been given to how, once conflicts get going, groups use demography as part of their strategy or indeed pursue demography as a strategic goal. Morland offers a framework for thinking about political demography then uses it to illuminate four cases, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and the USA. The framework revolves around what he calls ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ demographic engineering. Hard demographic engineering involves creating, moving or destroying people, as with genocide, pronatalism and ethnically selective policies of immigration and emigration. By contrast, soft demographic engineering encompasses the movement of political or identity boundaries in order to incorporate or exclude. Examples of the hard form include the expatriation of ‘Indian’ Tamils in Sri Lanka, encouragement of Catholic emigration from Northern Ireland, the high birth rate of both Jews and Arabs in Israel / Palestine and the Back to Africa Movement in the United States. Examples of soft demographic engineering include the partition of Ireland, the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza and the selective annexation of conquered Mexican territory by the United States. Teasing out sources and supplementing the secondary record with interviews and archival work, Morland has thrown new light on the workings of ethnic conflict and offers an intriguing and fresh perspective on an important part of the way the world works, relevant for historians, geographers, social scientists and policy-makers alike.








































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