Learn Japanese Pod

Sep 04 2020 25 mins 10.5k

This is a podcast and website for studying Japanese











Podcast 32: Just the dialogues
Jun 24 2020 2 mins  
These are the dialogues for podcast #32 “Making dinner plans with a friend” In this lesson you will learn the following: * How to make dinner plans with a friend * How to talk about a restaurant you regularly frequent Introduction In this podcast you will learn how to make dinner plans at a restaurant you regularly frequent. You’ll learn some natural phrases for making plans that native speakers commonly use. Check out the dialogue and grammar notes below for a detailed explanation. Main Dialog (Japanese) A: もしもし B: もしもしアレックス、明日夜ご飯食べに行かない? A: ごめん、明日はちょっと無理なんだ。土曜日なら行けるよ。 B: じゃあ土曜日の7時にいつものお寿司屋さんで! A: あみは本当にお寿司飽きないねー! Main Dialog (Pronunciation) A: Moshi moshi B: Moshi moshi, Arekkusu, ashita yoru gohan tabe ni ikanai? A: Gomen, ashita wa chotto muri nan da. Doyōbu nara ikeru yo. B: Jaa, doyōbi no shichi ji itsumo no osushi ya san de. A: Ami wa hontō osushi ni akinai ne. Main Dialog (English) A: Hello? B: Hi, Alex, do you wanna go out to eat dinner tomorrow? A: Sorry, tomorrow’s not possible. If it’s Saturday I can go. B: OK then, Saturday at 7 o’clock at the usual sushi place. A: Ami, you never get sick of sushi do you!? Grammar point and drills Here is a breakdown of the main grammar pattern featured in the dialogue: 土曜日の7時にいつものお寿司屋さんで Doyōbi no shichiji ni itsumo no osushiyasan de (Let’s meet on) Saturday at 7 o’clock the usual sushi place. Here are some more example drills: 1) 金曜日の6時半にいつものラーメン屋さんで。 Kinyōbi no roku ji ni itsumo no raamenyasan de. (Let’s meet on) Friday at 6 at the usual ramen place. 2) 日曜日の6時にいつものイタリアンで。 Nichiyōbi no rokuji ni itsumo no itarian de. (Let’s meet on) Sunday at 6 at the usual Italian place. 3) 木曜日の8時にいつもの居酒屋で。 Mokuyōbi no hachiji ni itsumo no izakaya de. (Let’s meet on) Thursday at 8 at the usual Izakaya. 4) 土曜日の7時にいつものカラオケで。 Doyōbi no shichiji ni itsumo no karaoke de. (Let’s meet on) Saturday at 7 at the usual Karaoke place.   Random Phrase of the Week The random phrase of the week is where we teach you a random Japanese phrase to make your friends laugh and ask “where did you learn that from?!” 行き当たりばったり – Ikiatari battari Meaning: unplanned and making decisions on the fly / Playing it by ear. It’s generally used in a negative way but there are some exceptions Example sentences: 1) 行き当たりばったりでなんでも決めちゃう。 Ikiatari battari de nandemo kimechau. To make decisions in a random or unplanned way 2) 行き当たりばったりな旅だった。 Ikiatari battari na tabi datta It was an unplanned trip. 3) 行き当たりばったりにレストランを選んだ。 Ikiatari battari resutoran o eranda. I randomly chose a restaurant. For more podcasts on how to learn to speak natural fluent Japanese visit Learn Japanese pod




Podcast 31: Just the dialogues
May 06 2020 1 mins  
These are the Japanese dialogues for podcast #31: Convenience Store Japanese. Introduction In this podcast you will learn useful Japanese phrases for shopping at a convenience store. Understanding the polite language used by convenience store staff can be a little confusing at first. However, if you learn common set phrases it’s not that hard to understand. Main Dialog (Japanese) A: いらっしゃいませ、お次の方どうぞ. B: ファミチキを一つとハッシュポテトを一つお願いします。 A: こちら温めますか。 B: はい、お願いします A: お箸をお付けしますか。 B: はい、お願いします。 A: 袋お分けしますか。 B: 大丈夫です。 A: ポイントカードはお持ちですか。 B: はい。 A: 1500円になります。1万円からでよろしいですか。 B: はい A: ありがとうございました Main Dialog ( Japanese pronunciation) A: Irasshaimase, otsugi no kata dōzo. B: Famichiki o hitotsu to Hasshu potato o hitotsu onegaishimasu. A: Kochira atatamemasu ka. B: Hai, onegai shimasu. A: Ohashi o otsuke shimasu ka. B: Hai, onegai shimasu. A: Fukuro owake shimasu ka. B: Daijōbu desu. A: Pointo kaado wa omochi desu ka. B: Hai. A: Sen gohyaku ni narimasu. Ichi man en kara yoroshii desu ka. B: Hai A: Arigatō gozaimasu. Main Dialog (English) A: Welcome, next customer please. B: One Famichiki (fried Family Mart chicken) and one hashed potato please. A: Would you like it heated? B: Yes, please. A: Would you like chopsticks with that? B: Yes, please/ A: Would you like to use seperate bags? B: No, that’s fine. A: Do you have a point card? B: Yes. A: That’ll be 1500 yen. Shall I give you change from this 10,000 yen bill? B: Yes. A: Thanks. Extra Phrases Saying Yes and No To recap, when talking to Konbini staff you’ll mostly say: はい、お願いします – Hai, Onegai shimasu – Yes please 大丈夫です – Daijōbu desu – No, it’s OK Ordering stuff One useful phrase is これ一つお願いします Kore o hitotsu onegai shimasu – which means I’ll have one of that. When you aren’t sure of the name for something, you can point and say that. So usually at the register or レジ reji – there’ll be a glass case with hot food such as fried chicken, potato and other foods. Sometimes the kanji can be hard to read so just point and say これ一つお願いします Kore o hitotsu onegai shimasu Bags One thing you’ll definitely be talking about is plastic bags. Here are some useful phrases: 袋にお入れしますか Fukuro oire shimasu ka. Do you need a bag? 袋お分けしますか Fukuro owake shimasu ka. Shall I put these in separate bags? このままでよろしいでしょうか Kono mama de yoroshii deshō ka Do you want it just like this. You don’t need a bag right? 袋は結構です Fukuro wa kekkō desu No, I don’t need a bag. Asking if you want chopsticks and other cutlery Another thing you will almost definitely be asked is if you want chopsticks, a spoon, a straw etc. お箸はご利用ですか Ohashi wa goriyō desu ka Will you be using chopsticks お箸をお付けしますか Ohashi o otsuke shimasu ka Do you want chopsticks? (Shall I add chopsticks?) スプーンをお付けしますか Supuun o otsuke shimasu ka Do you want a spoon? ストローをお付けしますか Sutoroo o otsuke shimasu ka Do you want a straw? Point card Another thing that might throw you off is point cards. Many konbini have customer loyalty point cards which allow you to build up points every time you make a purchase. So they’ll usually say: ポイントカードはお持ちですか Pointo kaado wa omochi desu ka Do you have a point card? Random Phrase of the Week 居留守 Irusu – To pretend to not be at home or 居留守を使う Irusu o tsukau – To pretend to not be at home You use this when someone rings on your doorbell and you pretend to not be in. You can also use it for the telephone when someone rings and you don’t answer.  




Podcast 30: Just the dialogues
Mar 25 2020 1 mins  
Talking about your plans for the year In this podcast you will learn how to talk about your New Year’s resolutions, your plans and goals for the coming year. Check out the main dialogue to learn natural phrases and vocabulary for this lesson. Vocabulary from the podcast 新年の抱負 Shinnen no hōfu New Year’s resolution 日本語 Nihongo Japanese (Language) 上達 Jōtatsu Improve 本を読む Hon o yomu To read books 後 Ato Also / As well / After that もっと Motto More 読みたい Yomitai I want to read 健康的 Kenkōteki Healthy なりたい Naritai Want to become 音楽活動 Ongaku katsudō Musical activities 頑張りたい Gambaritai I want to do my best やる気 Yaruki Motivation なんでもできる Nandemo dekiru You can do anything よし Yosh(i) Let’s do this Main Dialog (Japanese) A: ね、新年の抱負はなに? B: そうだね。やっぱり、日本語を上達させたいからもっと本を読むよ。後、もっと健康的になりたいな。あみは? A: 私も本をもっと読みたい!後、音楽活動をもっと頑張りたいな。 B: なるほどね。 A: やる気があれば、なんでもできるよ。 B: よし! Main Dialog ( Japanese pronunciation) A: Ne, shinnen no hōfu wa nani? B: Sō da ne. Yappari, nihongo o motto jōtatsu sasetai kara motto hon o yomu yo. Ato, motto kenkōteki ni naritai na. Ami wa? A: Watashi mo motto hon o yomitai! Ato, ongaku katsudō o motto gambaritai na. B: Naruhodo ne. A: Yaruki ga areba nandemo dekiru yo. B: Yosh! Main Dialog (English) A: Hey, what’s your New Year’s resolution? B: Well, let’s see. I guess I want to improve my Japanese and read more books. Also, I want to be more healthy. How about you Ami? A: I also want to read more books. Also, I want to go for it with my music. B: I see. A: If you have motivation you can do anything. B: Let’s do this! Grammar Drills Let’s drill a really useful phrase for talking about you goals for self improvement. Here’s the basic sentence structure: [The activity or goal] + [もっと頑張りたいな] I want to go for it (Lit. I want to try harder) Drill 1 音楽活動をもっと頑張りたいな。 Ongaku katsudō wo motto gambaritai na. I want to go for it with music Drill 2 仕事をもっと頑張りたいな。 Shigoto wo motto gambaritai na. I want to go for it at work Drill 3 日本語の勉強をもっと頑張りたいな。 Nihongo no benkyō wo motto gambaritai na. I want to go for it with my Japanese studies Drill 4 運動をもっと頑張りたいな。 Undō wo motto gambaritai na. I want to go for it for working out Drill 5 ダイエットをもっと頑張りたいな。 Daietto wo motto gambaritai na. I want to go for it for my diet   Random Phrase of the Week This week’s random phrase is… 奥が深い – Oku ga fukai This means something like it’s hard than you think or it’s deep or there’s more than meets the eye. Examples: * 日本語は奥が深い Nihongo wa oku ga fukai Japanese is a deep language / Japanese is a deep language   * この本は奥が深い Kono hon wa oku ga fukai This book is deep / There’s a lot more to this book than meets the eye   * 「七転び八起き」ということわざは奥が深い Nana korobi ya oki to iu kotowaza wa oku ga fukai The saying “fall seven times, stand up eight” is very deep in meaning.








Podcast 28: Just the dialogues
Sep 12 2019 3 mins  
If there is one thing Japanese love to talk about, it’s the weather. Apart from discussing the forecast, it’s quite common to mention the weather in small talk or when striking up a conversation with someone you don’t know so well. Also, as you’ll probably be checking the weather on a daily basis, it makes sense to study related vocabulary and grammar as it’s so useful. Simply listen to the podcast and read along with the dialogues below. Main Dialogue (Japanese) A: 今日暑いよね。 B: そうだね。超ジメジメしてるね。 A: 今週の天気予報は? B: 今週はずっと35度だよ。 A: うそ!マジで?!もう我慢できない。 B: だけど週末は雨が降りそう。 A: あ、良かった、こんな猛暑だと北極に引っ越ししたくなるな。 Main Dialogue (Pronunciation) A: Kyō atsui yo ne. B: Sō da ne. Chō jime jime shiteru ne. A: Konshuu no tenki yohō wa? B: Konshuu was zutto sanjuu go do da yo. A: Uso! Majide? Mō gaman dekinai. B: Dakedo, shuumatsu wa ame ga furi sō. A: A, yokatta, konna mōsho da to hokkyoku ni hikkoshi shitakunaru na. Main Dialogue (English) A: It’s hot today isn’t it? B: It sure is. It’s so hot and sticky. A: What the weather forecast for this week? B: It’s going to be 35 degrees all week. A: No way! Seriously?! I can’t take this anymore. B: But it looks like it might rain on the weekend. A: Ah good. This kind of heat makes me want to move to the Arctic!






Podcast 26: Just the dialogues
Jun 17 2019 1 mins  
In this podcast you’re going to learn useful verbs to talk about your daily routine. These verbs are very commonly used in casual conversation throughout the day so they are well worth learning. You will also study a little grammar related to plain form verbs and -TE form verbs which are the most common type of verb used in casual speech. You will also learn how they are used together when describing actions in a sequence. Also, the dialogue in this lesson will teach you particles which are sounds that usually go at the end of sentences to change the nuance of what you are saying. Learning these will help you sound a lot more natural when speaking Japanese. A: Amiの平日の過ごし方を教えて! B: 7時に起きて、顔を洗って、朝ごはんを食べるよ。 その後着替えて、メイクして、仕事に行くよ。 A: 休憩時間は? B: 休憩時間はお弁当を食べて、携帯で時間を潰すよ。 A: 仕事が終わったら? B: うちに帰って、晩御飯を食べて、お風呂に入るよ。 A: その後は何をするの? B: 寝る! A: Amiは忙しいね! B: まあね! Podcast Dialogue (Pronunciation) A: Ami no heijitsu no sugoshikata oshiete! B: Shichi ji ni okite, kao o aratte, asagohan o taberu. Sono ato kigaete, meiku shite, shigoto ni iku yo. A: Kyuukei jikan wa? B: Kyukeijikan wa obentō o tabete keitaii de jikan o tsubusu yo. A: Shigoto ga owattara? B: Uchi ni kaette, bangohan o taberu, ofuro ni hairu yo. A: Sono ato nani suru no? B: Neru! A: Ami wa isogashii ne. B: Maa ne. Podcast Dialogue (English) A: Ami, how do you spend your weekdays? B: I wake up at 7, I wash my face and eat breakfast. After that I get dressed, put on my makeup and go to work. A: What about your break time? B: During my break time I eat a bento and kill time with my mobile phone. A: And when work finishes? B: I go home, I eat dinner and have a bath. A: What do you do after that? B: Sleep! A: Ami, you’re busy! B: I guess so.




Podcast 25: Just the dialogues
May 01 2019 3 mins  
In this podcast you’re going to learn about how to use adverbs of frequency in daily speech. In other words, you’ll learn how to ask and answer questions about how often you do things in Japanese. You’ll learn how to ask questions such as “How often do you…”. You’ll also be able to reply that you do something never, occasionally, sometimes, often and always. This kind of grammar and vocabulary comes up often in daily conversation as well as the Japanese Language Proficiency Exam so it’s well worth learning. First of all, have a look at the vocabulary lists to get an idea of the main phrases used in this podcast. After that you can practice how to use that vocabulary naturally with the dialog examples. Following that are extra grammar and sentence examples. Also, while reading this PDF lesson, you can listen along to either the main audio podcast which contains all the dialogs and explanations in English. Alternatively you can listen to the Japanese only audio file. Main Lesson Vocabulary Here are the main adverbs of frequency commonly used in daily Japanese conversation. Main Dialog 1 – Adverbs of frequency – (Japanese) A: アレックスはどれくらい*運動するの? B: 全然しないよ。 時間がないからさ。 A: そうなんだ。 A: 昔はよくしてただけどね。あみは? B: 時々ジョギングするよ。たまに水泳もするよ。 A: じゃ、もうすぐオリンピックだから毎日 運動しよう。 Main Dialog 1 – Adverbs of frequency – (English) A: Arekkusu wa dore kurai undō suru no. Alex, how often do you exercise? B: Zenzen shinai yo. Jikan ga nai kara sa. Never. It’s cos I don’t have any time, you know. A: Sō nan da. Really? B: Mukashi wa yoku shiteta kedo ne. Ami wa? I used to however. How about you Ami? A: Tokidoki jogingu suru yo. Tama ni suiei mo suru yo. I sometimes go jogging. I occasionally also go swimming. B: Ja, mō sugu orinpikku dakara mainichi undō shiyō. Well, it’s almost time for the Olympics so exercise everyday! Particles used in this dialog: Wa – Sentence subject marker (As for so and so…) Ga – Similar to Wa and is often used in sentences about having or not having something No – Turns sentence into a question (Casual) Yo – Emphasizes the statement Ne – Means isn’t it or right? Sa – Means something like “You know?” or “You see what I mean” Extra example sentences Japanese only dialog audio (From 00:47) Zenzen – Not at all (00:47) 1: どれくらいお寿司食べるの? ぜんぜん食べないよ。 Dore kurai osushi taberu no? Zenzen tabenai yo. How often do you eat sushi? I never eat it. 2: どれくらい映画を見るの? ぜんぜん見ないよ。 Dore kurai eiga o miru no? Zenzen minai yo. How often do you watch movies? I never watch them. Metta ni – Hardly ever (01:11) 1: どれくらいお寿司食べるの? 滅多に食べないよ。 Dore kurai osushi taberu no? Metta ni tabenai yo. How often do you eat sushi? I hardly ever eat it. 2: どれくらい映画を見るの? 滅多に見ないよ。 Dore kurai eiga o miru no? Metta ni minai yo. How often do you watch movies? I hardly ever watch them. Tama ni – Occasionally (01:38) 1: どれくらいお寿司食べるの? たまに食べるよ。 Dore kurai osushi taberu no? Tama ni taberu yo. How often do you eat sushi? I occasionally eat it. 2: どれくらい映画を見るの? たまにに見るよ。 Dore kurai eiga o miru no? Tama ni miru yo. How often do you watch movies? I occasionally watch them. Tokidoki – Sometimes (02:03) 1: どれくらい運動するの? ときどきするよ。 Dore kurai undō suru no? Tokidoki suru yo. How often do you exercise? I sometimes exercise. 2: どれくらいカラオケに行くの? ときどき行くよ。 Dore kurai karaoke iku no? Tokidoki iku yo. How often do you go to Karaoke? I sometimes go. Yoku – Often (02:29) 1: どれくらい運動するの? よく運動するよ。 Dore kurai undō suru no? Yoku undō suru yo. How often do you exercise? I often exercise. 2: どれくらいカラオケに行くの? よく行くよ。



Podcast 24: Just the dialogues
Jan 30 2019 2 mins  
In this podcast you will learn how to book a table at a restaurant by phone in natural Japanese. These days it is easy to make bookings online and with mobiles apps. However, there are still many restaurants in Japan which don’t have online booking facilities. Also, in crowded cities like Osaka and Tokyo, it can be hard to get a seat, especially during Fridays and weekends. Therefore being able to book seats in Japanese by phone is a useful skill. Another thing you will learn is the polite language commonly used by restaurant and service staff. This is called Keigo and is a very polite way of speaking in Japanese. It’s also quite tricky to master as it uses different phrases and vocabulary compared with casual speech. However, I would recommend learning just enough to be able to understand it so you can interact with hotel, restaurant or department store staff. You don’t need to learn to speak it perfectly, just understanding a little is enough. Most Japanese people have difficulty speaking proper Keigo! Check out the podcast lessons and accompanying files which will help you learn to speak the dialogs fluently. Main Dialogue (Japanese) A: 居酒屋忍者でございます。 B: 今晩の予約をしたいんですが。 A: はい、かしこまりました。何名様でいらっしゃいますか? B: 4名でお願いしたいんですが。 A: 何時からご希望ですか? B: 7時でお願いします。 A: 少々お待ちください。お待たせいたしました。 お席ご用意できます。お名前お伺いしてもよろしでしょうか? B: アレックスです。 A: アレックス様ですね。 では本日7時から4名様でご予約させていただきます。 お待ちしております。 A: Izakaya Ninja de gozaimasu. – This is Izakaya Ninja B: Konban no yoyaku o shitain desu ga. – I’d like to make a booking for tonight. A: Hai, kashikomarimashita. Nanmei sama de irasshimasu ka? – Yes, certainly. How many people are there in your party? B: Yonmei de onegai shitain desu ga. – I’d like (to book for) 4 people. A: Nanji kara gokibō desu ka. – What time would you like (to book)? B: Shichiji de onegai shimasu. – Seven o’clock please. A: Shōshō omachi kudasi. Omatasei itashimashita. Oseki go yōi dekimasu. Onamae oukagai shitemo yoroshi deshou ka. – One moment please. Thank you for waiting I have prepared your seats. May I have your name please? B: Arekkusu desu. – It’s Alex A: Arekkusu sama desu ne. Dewa honjitsu shichiji kara yonmei sama de goyoyaku sasete itadakimasu. Omachi shite orimasu. – OK, so that is Alex. So, I have prepared your booking for 7pm for 4 people today. We shall be waiting for you.




Podcast 23: Just the dialogues
Dec 12 2018 3 mins  
In this episode, Ami and Alex teach you how to speak Osaka dialect which is called Osaka Ben in Japanese. And for this lesson Ami sensei is our secret weapon as she is a native of Osaka city. Sometimes this is referred to as Kansai Ben however, Kansai is the larger region located in central Japanese that includes Osaka city, Kyoto, Nara, Wakayama, Shiga, Mie and Hyogo. And in turn, each of those areas have their own dialects. However, Ami sensei is from Osaka, and Osaka Ben is the dominant dialect that influences all the surrounding areas. Therefore we decided to go with Osaka Ben. Of course this lesson is not a comprehensive guide to Osaka Ben as that would fill a few books. However, this lesson will teach you the most common phrases, speech patterns and intonation that you will hear on the streets of Osaka. The main dialog is recorded by natives from Osaka including Ami so you’ll learn the authentic accent. We also included a dialog in standard Japanese so you can compare. Enjoy! Main Dialog – Osaka Ben (Japanese) A: めっちゃ久しぶりやん。最近どないしてんの? B: 相変わらずやで。そっちは? A: ぼちぼちやな。ま、頑張ってるで。 B: そうなんや。うちなんか全然あかんわ。 A: なんでなん? B: 彼氏と別れてん。 A: え、そうなん?知らんかった。俺やって全然彼女できへんで。 B: 付き合おか。 A: なんでやねん! Main Dialog – Osaka Dialect (English and pronunciation) A: Meccha hisashiburi yan. Saikin donain shiten no? –It’s been ages. How have you been recently? B: Aikawarazu ya de. Socchi wa? –Same as usual. About about you? A: Bochi bochi ya na. Ma, gannbatteru de. – So so I guess. Well, doing my best. B: Sō nan ya. Uchi nanka zenzen akan wa. – Really? I’m not good at all. A: Nande nan? – Why? B: Kareshi to wakareten. –I split up with my boyfriend. A: E? Sō nan? Shirankatta. Boku yatte, zenzen kanojo dekihen de. – Eh? Really? I didn’t know. I can never get a girlfriend. B: Tsuki aoka? –Wanna date? A: Nande yanen! – What the heck! Main Dialog – Standard Dialect Version Here is the same dialog written in standard Japanese. Can you spot the differences? A: めちゃめちゃ久しぶりじゃん。最近どうしてるの? Meccha hisashiburi jan. Saikin dō shiteru no. It’s been ages. How have you been recently? B: 相変わらずだよ。そっちは? Aikawarazu da yo. Socchi wa?Same as usual. About about you? A: 普通かな。




Podcast 22: Just the dialogues
Aug 31 2018 2 mins  
Have you been scratching your head trying to work out what “Yappari” means? Well, scratch your head no more! In this podcast Ami sensei and I (Alex) attempt to explain what Yappari means. We teach you the three main meanings of Yappari and how to use it naturally and fluently in conversation with your Japanese friends. For more information keep reading, listen to the podcast and download the show notes. What does Yappari mean? 1. Yappari – I knew it! One common use of yappari expresses the fact that your assumptions or predictions were proved to be correct. It also means you were not surprised by a particular outcome. It might be translated into English as “I knew it”, “As I suspected…” or “…but of course…” Another way to think of it is as a phrase that emphasises IS or WAS, as in “It WAS you” or “He IS the culprit!” Here’s an example of how it can be used in conversation. Dialog 1 A: ねえ、最後のクッキー食べた? Ne, saigo no kukkii tabeta? Hey, did you eat the last cookie? B: え… E… Um… A: ほら!何これ?クッキーでしょう?! Hora! Nani kore? Kukki deshō?! Look! What’s this? It’s a cookie isn’t it?! B: だって、お腹減ってたから。 Datte, onaka heteta kara. But, I was hungry. A: やっぱり。 Yappari. I knew it! B: ごめんね。 Gomen ne. Sorry.   Here are some other examples that express the yappari in the same way. * 彼が犯人だとずっと思ってて、やっぱりそうだった。 Kare wa hannin da to zutto omottete, yappari sō datta. I thought he was the criminal, and I knew it, he was.   * もう一度やってみたけどやっぱり無理だった Mō ichido yatte mita kedo, yappari muri datta. I tried one more time, but as I suspected, it was impossible.   * やっぱり彼女来なかった。 Yappari kanojo konakatta. I knew it, she didn’t come. 2. Yappari – Indeed it is! Another use of yappari emphasises the strength of your opinion. For example, I really do think that something is true. やっぱり温泉が好き Yappari onsen ga suki means I really do indeed love hot springs. English translations might include “indeed” or “of course”. Dialog 2 A: 日本で何が一番好き? Nihon de nani ga ichiban suki? What do you most like about Japan? B: やっぱり温泉が好き。あみは? Yappari onsen ga suki. Ami wa? I really do love hot springs. How about you Ami? A: たこ焼きかな。 Takoyaki kana? Takoyaki I guess. B: やっぱりね。 Yappari ne. I knew it.   Note: In this conversation we have two different examples of how yappari is used. Yappari onsen ga suki is the 2nd use of yappari which emphasises the point that the speaker does indeed like hot springs. After Ami says she likes Takoyaki, the reply is yappari which in this case is means “I knew it” as we learned with dialog 1. Here are some more examples of how yappari is used to mean “indeed” or “of course”: 2.



Podcast 21: Just the dialogues
Aug 25 2018 2 mins  
This podcast episode is about various phrases you can use to start up a conversation in Japanese. It is important to remember that each conversation is unique and how you start one depends on who you are talking to and the situation. However, in this episode you will hear some of the most common phrases you are likely to hear used by Japanese people. One final thing to remember is that this episode focuses on casual conversations between friends. Here is a full vocabulary list taken from the podcast Japanese Pronunciation English 久しぶり Hisashiburi Long time no see 元気? Genki? How you doing? 相変わらず Aikawarazu …as usual バタバタしてる Batabata shiteru Really busy / hectic 夏バテ Natsubate Exhaustion from the summer つらい Tsurai Tough 最近どう? Saikin dō? How’ve you been? すごく暑い Sugoku Atsui Very hot すごく寒い Sugoku Samui Very cold 熱中症 Necchūshō Heat stroke 風邪をひいちゃった Kaze o hiichatta I caught a cold インフルエンザ Infuruenza Influenza 気をつけてね Ki o tsukete ne Take care   Podcast Dialog 1 A: 久しぶり元気? Hisashiburi genki Long time no see, you good? B: 元気だよ。あみは? Genki da yo. Ami wa? I’m good. And you Ami? A: 相変わらずバタバタしているよ。最近どう? Aikawarazu batabata shiteru yo. Saikin dō? Busy as usual. How’ve you been? B: そうだね。ちょっと夏バテがつらい。 Sō da ne. Chotto natsubate ga tsurai. Well, I’ve been suffering due to the summer heat. A: 最近はすごく暑いよね。熱中症にならないように気をつけてね。 Saikin wa sugoku atsui yo ne. Necchūshō ni naranai yō ni ki o tsukete ne. It’s been really hot recently hasn’t it? Be careful not to get heat stroke. B: はーい! Haai Sure. Dialog 2 A: 久しぶり元気? Hisashiburi genki Long time no see, you good? B: 元気だよ。あみは? Genki da yo. Ami wa? I’m good. And you Ami? A: 相変わらずバタバタしているよ。最近どう? Aikawarazu batabata shiteru yo. Saikin dō? Busy as usual. How’ve you been? B: そうだね。ちょっと風邪をひいちゃったよ。 Sō da ne. Chotto kaze o hiichatta yo. Well, I caught a cold. A: 最近はすごく寒いよね。インフルエンザにならないように気をつけてね。 Saikin wa sugoku samui yo ne. Infuruenza ni naranai yō ni ki o tsukete ne. It’s been really cold recently hasn’t it? Be careful not to get influenza. B: はーい! Haai Sure.




Podcast 20: Just the dialogues
Jul 14 2018 3 mins  
A great way to practice your Japanese speaking skills and to get to know people in Japan is to talk about free time and hobbies. In a casual setting you may be asked what you do in your free time by Japanese people. So this lesson will teach you the basics of how to ask and answer questions about hobbies. But first of all, listen to the audio podcast which goes through all the points in this lesson. You can also listen to the audio drills which include just the Japanese dialogs without English to practice your listening and speaking skills. Podcast Dialogs for talking about hobbies Here are four example dialogs from the podcast that give you various examples on how to hold a conversation in natural Japanese about hobbies and free time. Hobbies Dialog 1 A: 趣味は何? Shumi wa nani? What’s your hobby? B: そうだね、ギターかな。 Sō da ne. Gitaa kana. Well…guitar I guess. A: そっか。最初のきっかけは? Sokka. Saisho no kikkake wa? Really? How did you get in to it? B: ロックを聴くことが好きだからやってみようかなと思って。 Rokku wo kiku koto ga suki dakara yatte miyō kana to omotte. I like listening to rock so I thought I would give it a go. A: どのぐらいやってる? Dono gurai yatteru? How long have you been doing it? B: 20年。 Ni jū nen. 20 years. A: すごいね。しょっちゅうやってるの? Sugoi ne. Shocchū yatteru no? Wow, do you do it often? B: 毎日。 Mai nichi. Every day. A: へえ~。 Heh. Really? Hobbies Dialog 2 A: 趣味は何? Shumi wa nani? What’s your hobby? B: そうだね、ジョギングかな。 Sō da ne. Jogingu kana. Well…jogging I guess. A: そっか。最初のきっかけは? Sokka. Saisho no kikkake wa? Really? How did you get in to it? B: 運動することが好きだからやってみようかなと思って。 Undō suru koto ga suki da kara yatte miyō kana to omotte. I like exercising so I thought I would give it a go. A: どのぐらいやってる? Dono gurai yatteru? How long have you been doing it? B: 1年。 Ichi nen. 1 year. A: すごいね。しょっちゅうやってるの? Sugoi ne. Shocchū yatteru no? Wow, do you do it often? B: 週に2回。 Shū ni ni kai. Two times a week. A: へえ~。 Heh. Really?   Hobbies Dialog 3 A: 趣味は何? Shumi wa nani? What’s your hobby? B: そうだね、読書かな。 Sō da ne. Dokusho kana. Well…reading I guess. A: そっか。最初のきっかけは? Sokka. Saisho no kikkake wa? Really? How did you get in to it? B: 本を読むことが好きだからやってみようかなと思って。 Hon o yomu koto ga suki da kara yatte miyō kana to omotte. I like reading books so I thought I would give it a go. A: どのぐらいやってる? Dono gurai yatteru? How long have you been doing it? B: 6ヶ月。 Rokka getsu. 6 months. A: すごいね。しょっちゅうやってるの? Sugoi ne. Shocchū yatteru no? Wow, do you do it often? B: 時間がある時に。 Jikan ga aru toki ni. When I have time. A: へえ~。 Heh. Really?   Hobbies Dialog 4 A: 趣味は何? Shumi wa nani? What’s your hobby? B: そうだね、カメラかな。 Sō da ne. Kamera kana. Well…photography I guess. A: そっか。最初のきっかけは? Sokka. Saisho no kikkake wa? Really? How did you get in to it?








Podcast 18: Just the dialogues
Apr 21 2018 1 mins  
In this lesson you are going to learn how to say “must” in Japanese. Here’s the problem. There are a confusing number of ways to say it. Just look at this list of phrases which all mean the same thing: しなければなりません Shinakereba narimasen しなければいけません Shinakereba ikemasen しなくてはいけません Shinakute wa ikemasen しなくちゃいけません Shinakucha ikemasen しなきゃいけません Shinakya ikemasen しないといけません Shinai to ikemasen しなくちゃ Shinakucha しなきゃ Shinakya しないと Shinai to Not only that but each way of saying “must” in Japanese has a different level of politeness associated with it for different social situations. It’s also quite common for Japanese schools and textbooks to only teach the formal way of saying of “must”. However, in daily life in Japan, you will notice that most of the time, people tend to use the casual form. But fear not dear student of Japanese, Learn Japanese Pod will help you to navigate this linguistic confusion. We are all about teaching you the most useful and natural Japanese for daily life in Japan. Therefore, this lesson will exclusively focus on the casual form which in my experience is the most useful form to know. But before we do, let’s briefly study the grammar and a little of the culture behind this. Grammar: How to say “must” in Japanese One of the most formal and common ways you will be taught “must” in Japanese is: しなければなりません Shinakereba narimasen This is made from two parts “Shinakereba” which means “If I do not” and “Narimasen” which means “It is not allowed”. So this literally means, “it is not allowed if I do not do it” or “It will be bad if I don’t do it”. This two part form is used for most levels of politeness If I don’t do it It will not be allowed Shinakereba Narimasen Shinakereba Ikemasen Shinakya Ikemasen There is no direct way of saying must in Japanese so this indirect double negative form is used. This roundabout way of saying “must” in Japanese perhaps reflects the way Japanese shy away from direct language and confrontational statements. The most common way to say “must” in Japanese As you will discover when you come to Japan, most people in daily conversation use the common form. Instead of using the tongue twisting “Shinakereba narimasen” you can drop the -nakereba narimasen and simply add -kya to give you shinakya – I must do something. The formal way of saying I have to clean the house is: 掃除しなければなりません – Sōji shinakereba narimasen – I have to clean (the house) However, the more common and easy way to say that is 掃除しなきゃ – Sōji shinakya – I have to clean How to construct the casual form of “must” in Japanese To say you must do something using other verbs using the casual form, simply follow these steps: Step 1) Take the negative casual form of a verb, for example: しない Shinai Don’t do 行かない Ikanai Don’t go 食べない Tabenai Don’t eat 買わない Kawanai Don’t buy Step 2) Replace the -i at the end of the verb with -kya しなきゃ Shinakya I must do (something) 行かなきゃ Ikanakya I must go (somewhere) 食べなきゃ Tabenakya I must eat (something) 買わなきゃ Kawanakya I must buy (something) Finally, there are three common casual forms: 1) しなきゃ Shinakya 2) しなくちゃ Shinakucha 3) しないと Shinai to Sometimes people will add いけない to the end of these forms to make: しなきゃいけない しなくちゃいけない しないといけない You can use any of these forms in a casual setting to say you must do something. This lesson will focus on using just shinakya. Main Dialog A: ごめん、もう行かなきゃ。 Gomen mō ikanakya. Sorry, I have to go. B:



Fun Friday: Japanese TV Shows
Mar 09 2018 45 mins  
In this episode, Ami and I talk about our favorite Japanese TV shows. Watching Japanese TV shows regardless of you Japanese level is great way to improve your understanding of Japanese culture. It also gives you a common frame of reference to have more interesting conversations with Japanese people. Although Japanese TV is not so accessible outside of Japan, you can usually find extended clips on Youtube. You can also find some Japanese TV shows that have English subtitles. Here is a list of some of the shows we talked about in the podcast: Japanese TV Shows 1. 水戸黄門 Mito Kōmon This is a samurai drama set in the Edo period featuring the hero Tokugawa Mitsukuni who roams Japan fighting injustice. 2. 空耳アワーSora Mimi Awa Sora mimi awa is part of the Tamori Club TV show where listeners submit foreign songs that have sections that sound Japanese. 3. Smap x Smap Smap X Smap is the long running variety show featuring the boy band Smap. One of the most popular sections of the show was Smap Bistro where the members would compete to cook the most delicious dishes for famous visiting celebrities. 4. ダウンタウンのガキの使いやあらへんで Dauntaun no gaki no tsukai ya arahende “Dauntaun no gaki no tsukai ya arahende” A.K.A “Gaki Tsuka” is hosted by one of Japan’s most famous comedy duo “Downtown” who are Hitoshi Matsumoto and Masatoshi Hamada. 5. 紅白歌合戦 Kōhaku Uta Gassen This is the famous singing contest held by NHK as Japan celebrates the new year. This show is perhaps one of the most watched programs on Japanese TV and features famous singers from across Japan. 6. ナイトスクープ Naito Sukuupu (Knight Scoop) Knight Scoop is a famous TV show from Kansai (Osaka) which features requests from viewers who need help with various random problems. The show is hosted by comedians and actors who visit viewers and try to help them out with their request. Invariably, hilarity ensues. 7. 関ジャニ-クロニクル Kanjani Kuronikuru This variety show features the boy band Kanjani and their funny exploits. One section is the Dengon game know as Chinese whispers in English. Native English speakers whisper phrases to the band who usually mess us the message leading to some pretty funny results. 8. アメトーク Ame Tōku Ame Talk is a weekly show that invites comedians to talk on various subjects.  


Podcast 17: Just the dialogues
Feb 28 2018 2 mins  
In this lesson Ami and I teach you how to ask and give your opinions on various topics using the verb 思う Omou – To think. This is usually used to say “I think that…”. 思う is a very useful phrase you use all the time in conversation in Japanese. The main grammatical structure we will be using is this: Something or someone…どう思う?Dō omou which means what do you think about so and so… For example: 彼女どう思う? Kanojo wa dō omou What do you think of her? 彼どう思う? Kare wa dō omou What do you think of him? Then to answer you could say your opinion plus と思う which means I think so and so. So, for example you can say 可愛いと思うよ Kawaii to omou yo which means I think she’s cute or カッコイイと思うよ Kakko ii to omou which means I think he’s cool. Here are the example conversations in the podcast:   Dialog 01 A: 君のなはってどう思う? Kimi no na wa dō omou? What do you think of “Kimi no na wa”? B: 面白いと思うよ。 Omoshiroi to omou yo. I think it’s interesting. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: ストーリーがロマンチックだからね。 Sutoorii ga romanchikku da kara ne. Because the story is romantic. Dialog 02 A: ねぇ、iPhoneってどう思う? Nee, iPhone te dō omou? What do you think of the iPhone? B: まあまあだと思うよ。 Maamaa da to omou yo. It’s so so. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: 便利だけど高いからね。 Benri dakedo taki kara ne. Because it’s useful but expensive.   Dialog 03 A: ねぇ、この髪型ってどう思う? Nee, kono kamigata dō omou? What do you think of my hairstyle? B: 似合うと思うよ。 Niau to omou yo. It suits you. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: 君は顔が小さいからね。 Kimi wa kao ga chiisai kara ne. Because you have a small face.   Dialog 04 A: ねぇ、彼女ってどう思う? Nee, kanojo te dō omou? What do you think of her? B: 可愛いと思うよ。 Kawaii to omou yo. She’s cute. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: おっちょこちょいだからね。 Occhokochou dakara ne. Because she’s so clumsy. Dialog 05 A: ねぇ、彼ってどう思う? Nee, kare te dō omou? What do you think of him? B: いい人じゃないと思うよ。 Ii hito ja nai to omou yo. I don’t think he’s a good person. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: 浮気ばかりしてるからね。 Uwaki bakari dakara ne. Because he’s always cheating (on girls).   Dialog 06 A: ねぇ、このレストランってどう思う? Nee, kono restoran te dō omou? What do you think of this restaurant? B: イマイチだと思うよ。 IImaichi da to omou yo. It’s a little disappointing. A: なんでそう思うの? Nande sō omou no? Why do you think so? B: 食べ物は美味しいけどサービスが悪いからね。 Tabemono wa oishii kedo saabisu ga warui kara ne. Because although the food is good the service is bad.   Extra Grammar Notes Casual and polite ways to say “I think…” Casual Polite どう思う? Dō omou?What do you think? どう思いますか Dō omoimasu ka?What do you think? …と思う。…to omouI think… …と思います。…to omoimasu.I think …





Podcast 16: Just the dialogues
Jan 31 2018 3 mins  
In this podcast Ami and I talk about what to do if you lose your wallet or other personal items when in Japan. The good news is that Japanese people are generally very law abiding and honest. Therefore, if someone finds your lost item, there is a good chance they will hand it in to the police and you will get it back. If you do lose something, the best idea is to ring the place you think you left it and ask if it has been found. If you lose something on the train it’s best to go to the station master’s office and ask there. If you drop something in the street then you should go to a Koban or police box. This lesson focuses on how to call the last place you were at to ask the staff if they found you things. Study the vocabulary list and dialogs below to learn how to do it. Vocabulary featured in the podcast もしもし Moshi moshi Hello (On the phone) 一番寿司でございます Ichibanzushi de gozaimasu This is Ichiban Sushi すみません Sumimasen Excuse me 昨日 Kinō Yesterday そちら Sochira There (Polite) 財布 Saifu Wallet カバン Kaban Bag 携帯電話 Keitai denwa Mobile phone 忘れた Wasureta Forgot 何色 Nani iro What colour 少々お待ちください Shōshō omachi kudasai One moment please 届いてますよ Todoitemasu yo It is here (Someone found it) ありがとうございます Arigtō gozaimasu Thank you Dialog 01 A: もしもし幕張メッセでございます。 Moshi moshi, Makuhari Messe de gozaimasu. Hello, this is Makuhari Messe. B: すみません、昨日そちらで財布を忘れたのですが。 Sumimasen, Kinō sochira de saifu o wasureta no desu ga. Excuse me, I left a wallet there yesterday. A: 何色のお財布ですか。 Nani iro no osaifu desu ka What colour is the wallet? B: 黒い革の財布です。 Kuroi kawa no saifu desu It is a black leather wallet. A: 少々お待ちください。届いていますよ。 Shōshō omachi kudasai. Todoite imasu yo. One moment please. We have it. B: ありがとうございます。 Arigatō gozaimasu. Thank you very much. Dialog 02 A: もしもし一番寿司でございます。 Moshi moshi, Ichibanzushi de gozaimasu. Hello, this is Ichiban Sushi. B: すみません、昨日そちらでカバンを忘れたのですが。 Sumimasen, Kinō sochira de kaban o wasureta no desu ga. Excuse me, I left a bag there yesterday. A: 何色のおカバンですか。 Nani iro no okaban desu ka What colour is the bag? B: 赤い革のカバンです。 Akai kawa no kaban desu It is a red leather bag. A: 少々お待ちください。届いていますよ。 Shōshō omachi kudasai. Todoite imasu yo. One moment please. We have it. B: ありがとうございます。 Arigatō gozaimasu. Thank you very much. Dialog 03 A: もしもし六本木ヒルズでございます。 Moshi moshi, Roppongi Hiruzu de gozaimasu. Hello, this is Roppongi Hills. B: すみません、昨日そちらで携帯電話を忘れたのですが。 Sumimasen, Kinō sochira de keitaidenwa o wasureta no desu ga. Excuse me, I left a mobile phone there yesterday. A: 携帯電話の機種はなんですか。 Keitaidenwa no kishu wa nan desu ka. What type of phone is it? B: iPhone8です。 iPhone hachi desu. It’s an iPhone 8. A: 少々お待ちください。届いていますよ。 Shōshō omachi kudasai. Todoite imasu yo. One moment please. We have it. B: ありがとうございます。 Arigatō gozaimasu.




Podcast 15: Just the dialogues
Dec 01 2017 1 mins  
In this podcast, Ami and I (Alex) teach you how to talk about your favorite movies in Japanese. Listen to the podcasts and read the dialogs below to get an idea of what these phrases and dialogs mean. You can also download the PDFs too! Enjoy! Dialog 01 Japanese Pronunciation English A: 「君の名は」見た? “Kimi no na wa” mita? Did you see “Kimi no na wa”? B: 見たよ! Mita yo! I saw it! A: どうだった?面白かった? Dō datta. Omoshirokatta? How was it? Was it interesting? B: うん、すごく面白かったよ。 Un, omoshirokatta yo. Uh huh, it was interesting. A: 私も見ようかな? Watashi mo miyō kana I guess I should go and see it. B: うん、すごくおすすめだよ。 Un, sugoku osusume da yo. Yeah, I highly recommend it   Dialog 02 Japanese Pronunciation English A: 「ミニオンズ」見た? “Minions” mita? Did you see “Minions”? B: 見たよ! Mita yo! I saw it! A: どうだった?面白かった? Dō datta. Omoshirokatta? How was it? Was it interesting? B: 面白かったけど、声優がイマイチだった。 Omoshirokatta kedo seiyuu ga imaichi datta. It was interesting but the voice actors weren’t so good. A: 私も見ようかな? Watashi mo miyō kana I guess I should go and see it. B: そうだね、もし週末時間があったら見に行ってみればいいよ。 Sō da ne, moshi shuumatsu jikan ga attara mi ni itte mireba ii yo. Well, if you have time at the weekend, you should go and see it.   Dialog 03 Japanese Pronunciation English A: 「スターウォーズ」見た? Sutaauozu mita? Did you see Star Wars? B: 見たよ! Mita yo! I saw it! A: どうだった?面白かった? Dō datta. Omoshirokatta? How was it? Was it interesting? B: 全然面白くなかった。ストーリーがつまらなかった。 Zenzen omoshirokunakatta. Sutōrii ga tsumaranakatta. It wasn’t interesting at all. The story was boring. A: 私も見ようかな? Watashi mo miyō kana I guess I should go and see it. B: 止めた方がいいよ。 Yameta hō ga ii yo. You shouldn’t.




Podcast 14: Just the dialogues
Oct 25 2017 1 mins  
In this podcast, Ami and I, teach you some fun conversations you can have with your friends in Japanese. The first thing you need to know when speaking on the phone in Japanese is the word Moshi moshi which is hello but used exclusively for the phone. You can use this for both casual and polite conversations. Listen to the podcast and read the dialogs below to get a better idea of how to have a conversation on the phone in Japanese with your friends. Phone Dialog 01 Dialog 01 Japanese Pronunciation English A: もしもし Moshi moshi Hello B: もしもし、あみ元気? Moshi moshi, Ami genki? Hello, how are you Ami? A: 元気だよ Genki da yo I’m good. B: 最近どう? Saikin dō? How have you been recently? A: 最近は仕事漬けの毎日! Saikin wa shigotozuke no mainichi! Recently, I’ve been so busy at work. B: そうなんだ……大変だね。 Sō nan da…Taihen da ne. Oh really…that’s tough. A: 全然平気! Zenzen heiki! I’m totally fine! Phone Dialog 02 Dialog 02 Japanese Pronunciation English A: もしもし Moshi moshi Hello B: もしもし、あみ元気? Moshi moshi, Ami genki? Hello, how are you Ami? A: 元気だよ Genki da yo I’m good. B: 最近どう? Saikin dō? How have you been recently? A: 最近、彼女ができたよ Saikin kanojo ga dekita yo Recently I got a new girlfriend B: そうなんだ!良かったね! Sō nan da! Yokatta ne! Oh really? That’s great! A: 毎日楽しすぎる! Mainichi tanoshisugiru! It’s so much fun everyday!   Phone Dialog 03   Dialog 03 Japanese Pronunciation English A: もしもし Moshi moshi Hello B: もしもし、あみ元気? Moshi moshi, Ami genki? Hello, how are you Ami? A: 元気だよ Genki da yo I’m good. B: 最近どう? Saikin dō? How have you been recently? A: 最近、ジムに通い出したよ Saikin jimu ni kayoidashita yo Recently I started going to the gym. B: そうなんだ!良いね! Sō nan da! Ii ne! Oh really? That’s good! A: 毎日筋肉痛がやばいよ! Mainichi kinnikutsuu ga yabai yo! The muscle soreness is really bad everyday!   Extra Phone Phrases 携帯電話 – Keitai denwa – Mobile phone 携帯番号 – Keitai bangō – Mobile number メアド – Meado – Mail address 待受画面 – Machiukegamen – Standby screen (for phone) 写メ – Shame – Mobile phone picture スマホ – Sumaho – Smart Phone ガラケー – Garakeh – Flip phone   Polite Phone Phrases 田中さんはいらっしゃいますか – Tanaka san wa irasshaimasu ka Is Tanaka san there? / Can I speak to Mr. Tanaka?   田中は出かけております – Tanaka wa dekakete orimasu. Tanaka is out right now.   伝言をお願いします – Dengon o onegaishimasu. Can I leave a message please?   折り返しお電話いただけますか – Orikaeshi odenwa itadakemasu ka? Could you ask them to call me back please?




Podcast 13: Just the dialogues
Sep 06 2017 2 mins  
Everything You Need to Know to Speak Japanese Fluently My speaking fluent Japanese…sort of… One of the most common questions I get at Learn Japanese Pod is “How do I learn to speak Japanese fluently?”. The usual problem I hear is that although students study lots of vocabulary and grammar, they can’t seem to put it together to hold even a simple conversation. Fluency seems out of the question. Well, I hear you because I used to be in the same situation. I was really frustrated. However, after a lot of trial and error… and coffee, I eventually began to discover some effective study techniques, strategies and the mindset that actually worked. Now, fluency didn’t happen overnight but my ability to hold natural flowing conversations with my Japanese friends got noticeably better and my progress definitely sped up. So if you are feeling confused, frustrated and your motivation is crumbling, it’s time to get your Japanese back on track. So this is why I decided to make this podcast and guide to show you absolutely everything you need to know to speak Japanese fluently. You can listen to the podcast here where Ami sensei and I discuss this topic in detail. Then keep reading below for more in-depth information with links to useful resources. Podcast Dialog – How to Speak Japanese Fluently Japanese Pronunciation English A: 先生、質問しても良いですか? Sensei, shitsumon shite mo ii desu ka. Teacher, may I ask a question? B: はい、どうぞ。 Hai dōzo. Sure, go ahead. A: どうすれば日本語を流暢に話せるようになりますか? Dō sureba nihongo o ryuuchō ni hanaseru you ni narimasu ka? How can I become fluent at speaking Japanese? B: そうですね。やっぱり教材はもちろんですが、日本のテレビを観たり、日本の音楽をたくさん聴いてみてください。 Sō desu ne. Yappari kyōzai wa mochiron desu ga, nihon no terebi o mitari, nihongo no ongaku o takusan kiite kudasai. Let me see. Well of course you need study materials but you should watch Japanese TV, listen to a lot of music, stuff like that. A: なるほど。 Naruhodo. I see. B: 私の友達は、日本に住んだことはないですが、そうやって日本語を結構覚えましたよ。 Watashi no tomodachi wa nihon ni sunda koto ga nai desu ga sō yatte nihongo o kekkō oboemashita yo. I have a friend who never lived in Japan. However, he learned a lot of Japanese that way. A: 他に何かアドバイスはありますか? Hoka ni adobaisu ga arimasu ka? Do you have any other advice? B: 日本語が話せる友達を作って、積極的に日本語で会話をしましょう。 Nihongo ga hanaseru tomodachi o tsukutte, sekkyokuteki ni nihongo de kaiwa o shimashou. Make Japanese speaking friends and proactively try to have conversations in Japanese. A: 分かりました。頑張ります! Wakarimashita. Ganbarimasu. I understand. I will do my best. The Secret to Speaking Japanese Fluently Here’s the brutal truth. There is no secret to speaking fluent Japanese. And if anyone tells you there is a magical course that teaches you how to speak perfect Japanese in 3 days, buy a fire extinguisher because someone’s pants are on fire. It takes time, commitment and hard work…and coffee…I mentioned coffee right? Anyway, I can’t give you a magic pill BUT… And this is a big but… I can tell you the dumb things I did so you don’t have to. And that’s going to save you a LOT of time and frustration. Plus there are more efficient and effective ways to study that will further save time. But what do we actually mean by “fluency”? What does “fluent Japanese” mean? Fluent doesn’t necessarily mean native speaker level. To me, fluency simply means you can express what you want to say, clearly, easily and quickly without getting stuck or stumbling over your words. If you can order sushi or do a simple self introduction in Japanese,


Fun Friday 04: Our Favorite Japanese Bands
Aug 11 2017 40 mins  
Learn Japanese Pod Fun Friday: Our Favourite Japanese Bands In our latest Fun Friday Podcast, Ami and I talked about our favourite Japanese bands and other recent news that has been happening in our lives Welcome to Learn Japanese Pod and the Fun Friday episode where we temporarily put down our Japanese textbooks and talk about Japanese culture and anything else to do with Japan that floats into our heads. In this episode, Ami sensei and I talked about our favorite Japanese bands. I kinda showed my age with some of my selection with some old classic Japanese bands most older people know. But Ami Sensei also likes some of those old classics too so we have a lot of music in common that we like. So here is a break down of some of the music we talked about. 1. Utada Hikaru – Fantome If you don’t know who Utada Hikaru is, you must have been living in a cave. She is a diva megastar of Japanese pop and has a long career spanning all the way back to the late 90s. Her latest album is Fantome and features quite an eclectic range of styles on the album. It’s definitely worth a listen and for me Utada is one of those go-to classic J-Pop stars you should have in your Japanese music collection. 2. Kick The Can Crew – Super original I hadn’t heard of Kick the Can Crew until Ami introduced them to me on the podcast. And on the first listen I really liked them. Japanese are masters of importing foreign culture and recreating it with their own unique interpretation. And rap is no exception. Japanese rap has come into its own and is considered to be a unique and innovative genre. If you like Kick the Can Crew and want to check out more great Japanese rap bands then you won’t go wrong with Rip Slyme and Dragon Ash. 3. Super Fly – Ai O Komete Hanataba O Super Fly is often called the Janis Joplin of J-Pop. She sings a mix of J-pop and rock and has a wide range and present vocal stle which is a refreshing break from your typical female Japanese singer. She has some pretty solid albums and songs out there and one of my favorites is 愛をこめて花束を Ai o komete hanataba – a song that really showcases some great song writing and powerful singing. That’ll definitely get your toes tapping. 4. Wednesday Campanella – Diablo Wednesday Campanella is a Japanese pop group headed by the super talented KOM_I, a singer and rapper with an hilarious sense of humour and a very original and creative style. In terms of genre it mixes rap, hop hop, electronic music and J-pop. Their videos are also pretty funny and worth a listen. 5. Okuda Tamio – Marshmallow Okuda Tamio is a singer song writer, guitarist and producer. He was formerly in a band called Unicorn which was pretty famous in Japan. He later quit to follow his own career. If you ask most Japanese people they will have heard of him and is also known for producing the hit band Puffy. The reason I like him is simple. In a word: guitar. As a nerdy guitarist I love the way he produces rock and gets an incredibly fat guitar sounds. Worth a listen! 6. Dry and Heavy – New Creation Back in the 90s, reggae hit Japan in a big way and the Japanese reggae scene was born. Today you have some really big reggae music events in Japan including the Reggae Sun Splash festival. One really solid Japanese reggae band I love is “Dry and heavy” which has an incredibly well produced and tight sound. One thing I have found is their albums age really well so they are always a good go to band of summer parties and something to listen to on the beach. 7. Urufuruzu – Osaka Strut ウルフルズ Urufuruzu are a rock band from Osaka and “Osaka Strut” is one of their big hits. The band is headed by the charismatic Tortoise Matsumoto who has also tried his hand at acting. They enjoyed their biggest initial success with the song “Guts Da Ze”, a song you should attempt only when you have achieved your black belt in Karaoke. 8. Southern All stars



Podcast 12: Just the dialogues
Jul 26 2017 2 mins  
Talking about Personality in Japanese In this podcast, Ami Sensei and I teach you how to describe people’s personalities in natural Japanese. Listen to the full podcast and the dialog only audio underneath. So we thought we would have look at how to discuss people’s personalities in this week’s podcast. However, instead of only teaching a list of phrases, we wanted to give some conversational examples of how you might talk about people’s characters. Talking about people’s personalities in Japanese In this podcast, Ami sensei and I talk about how to describe people’s personalities in Japanese and how to talk about your favorite “type” of person for dating and romance. The first two dialogs show you how you can talk about people’s ideal boyfriend of girlfriend in terms of their personality. Podcast Dialog 1.1 A: ねえ、どんな人がタイプなの? Ne, donna hito ga taipu na no? Hey, what kind of person are you into? B: そうだね。やっぱり優しくて、気が利いて、陽気な人かな。 Sō da ne. Yappari yasashikute, ki ga kiite, yōki na hito kana. Let me see. Of course kind, thoughtful and outgoing. A: 本当?それだけ? Hontō? Sore dake? Really? That’s it? B: え?どういう意味それ? E? Dō iu imi sore? Eh? What do you mean by that? A: 今までの彼氏みんなイケメンだったし、本当は面食いなんでしょう? Ima made no kareshi ikemen datta shi, hontō wa menkui nan deshō? All your boyfriends until now have been really good looking. You’re just into looks aren’t you? B: うるさいなぁ、もう! Urusai na mō! Oh shut up!   Podcast Dialog 1.2 A: ねえ、どんな人がタイプなの? Ne, donna hito ga taipu na no? Hey, what kind of person are you into? B: そうだね。やっぱり優しくて、気が利いて、陽気な人かな。 Sō da ne. Yappari yasashikute, ki ga kiite, yōki na hito kana. Let me see. Of course kind, thoughtful and outgoing. A: 本当?それだけ? Hontō? Sore dake? Really? That’s it? B: え?どういう意味それ? E? Dō iu imi sore? Eh? What do you mean by that? A: 今までの彼女みんな美形だったじゃん、本当は見た目重視なんでしょう。 Ima made no kanojō minna bikkei datta shi, hontō wa menkui nan deshō? All your girlfriends until now have been really good looking. You’re just into looks aren’t you?



Podcast 11: Just the dialogues
May 31 2017
In this podcast, Ami sensei and I teach you about using the verb 食べる in the casual form which is used between people who know each other well in an informal situation. This is how you conjugate the verb taberu in plain form or “dictionary form”. Plain form verb – Taberu Positive Negative Present 食べる Taberu (To eat) 食べない Tabenai (Not eat) Past 食べた Tabeta (Ate) 食べなかった Tabenakatta (Didn’t eat) Japanese Verbs – Taberu Dialog A: ね、食べる? Ne taberu? You wanna eat? B: 食べない Tabenai. I don’t want to eat A: 食べないの? Tabenai no? You don’t want to eat? B: もう食べたから。食べなかったの? Mo tabeta kara. Tabenakatta no. Already ate. You didn’t eat? A: うん、食べなかった。食べようよ Un Tabenakatta. Tabeyō yo. I didn’t eat. Let’s eat! B: いらない、ひとりで食べて! Iranai, hitori de tabete. I don’t want any. You eat by yourself. Grammatical Breakdown of Dialog Rule 1 – You can drop the subject before a Japanese verb The dialog starts with ね – Ne which means “Hey” and used to get attention to start a conversation. Then the next word is 食べる? Taberu with a rising intonation. This literally means “Eat?”. One important thing to remember is that you don’t need to use the subject of the sentence as the meaning is understood from the context of the situation. If someone is looking at you and simply says “Taberu” with a rising inflection. You can be pretty sure that they mean “Do you want to eat”? which is what it means in this situation. In fact, this entire dialog is completely devoid of sentences with the words you or I in them. And this because… Rule 2 – You have to guess the meaning from the context As we continue to the next line in the dialog we have 食べない tabenai which means “not eat”. Again, from the context, you can guess this means “I don’t want to eat”. And context is everything here. This aspect of Japanese can make it easier for you to say more with less because minimalism is the key. It can also make it devilishly hard to understand what is being said because if you don’t understand the situation you won’t understand the conversation. Continuing we have 食べないの?Tabenai no which is literally “Not eat” + のno which signifies a question. This means “Not eat?” or “Don’t you want to eat?” Next we haveもう食べた Mō tabeta kara – This literally means “Already ate because” or “No because I already ate”. Then 食べなかったの Tabenakatta no – which means “didn’t eat” with the の question marker so “Didn’t you eat?”. Rule 3 – Yes means no and no means yes The answer to the question “Didn’t you eat” is うん 食べなかった Un Tabenakatta – Yes, I didn’t eat. This might be confusing as in English you would usually say: A: Didn’t you eat? B: No, I didn’t However in Japanese you have to say “Yes, I didn’t eat”. This is because in Japanese, when you say yes, you are agreeing directly with the statement that was just made so you could think of it as “Yes, it is true that I didn’t eat”. Rule 4 – Verbs ending in ō mean “Let’s do something” Next we hear 食べよう Tabeyō. This form of the verb is used to suggest or propose an idea. So it means “Let’s eat”. Theよ Yo at the end emphasizes the meaning more. Here are some more examples: 飲もうよ Nomō yo – Come on, let’s drink! 行こうよ Ikō yo – Come on, let’s go! やろうよ Yarō yo – Come on, let’s do this! Rule 5 – Verbs ending in “Te” can be an order to do something The last line of this dialog is いらいない Iranai – Not needed or more naturally “I don’t want any”. Finally we have 一人で食べて Hitori de tabete. Hitori means one person or in this case by yourself. 食べて Tabete is what’s called the “Te” form of the verb and is an order or request to do something so Tabete means “Eat!”. In this case the speaker is saying, “I don’t want any, you go ahead and eat by yourself”. What is Japanese plain verb form? In Japanese,



Podcast 10: Just the dialogues
May 03 2017 1 mins  
These are the dialogues from podcast #10 “The top 10 questions you will be asked in Japan” After living in Japan for over 20 years as a foreigner, I have noticed a clear pattern of questions I am often asked. As well as being very hospitable, the Japanese are inquisitive people who are genuinely interested in why people visit or live in their country. Therefore students of Japanese who are planning a trip to Japan will find it extremely useful to study those questions and how to answer them in Japanese. In this podcast, Ami Sensei and I go through the top 10 most common questions Japanese people ask and the cultural reasons behind them. So if you are slightly surprised or shocked by what you are asked, it’s usually due to a cultural difference which we discuss in the podcast. 1: お名前はなんですか Oname wa nan desu ka – What is your name? Although obvious, this is the first question you should learn. To reply, simply say your name + desu. アレックスです – Arekkusu desu – I am Alex. The other thing you should keep in mind is that Japanese say their surname first and first name last. So, if you want to say I am John Smith you would say スミスジョンです – Sumisu Jon Desu. Finally, saying your name using a Japanese accent or Katakana sounds might will make it a little easier for Japanese to understand you name. 2: お国はどちらですか Okuni wa dochira desu ka – Where are you from? Japanese people are always very interested in where you are from. To answer this question you could simply say アメリカです Amerika desu – America or イギリスです Igirisu desu – The UK. You can also say アメリカから来ました Amerika kara kimashita – I come from America. 3: お仕事は何をされていますか Oshigoto wa nani o sarete imasu ka – What do you do? This is a very common question that might be asked anywhere in the world. However, there is an added cultural dimension to this. When meeting people for the first time, Japanese people tend to ask questions that give them an idea of the social status of the person they are speaking to so as to communicate with an appropriate level of politeness or respect. To answer this question simply say your job + desu. For example 学生です Gakusei desu – I am a student. サラリマンです Sarariman desu – I am an office work (only for men). Women might say OLです – Oh Eru desu – I am (a female) office worker. 4: なんで日本へ来たんですか Nande nihon e kitan desu ka – Why did you come to Japan? This is the perhaps the most commonly asked question foreigners get when visiting or living in Japan. In fact there is a very popular show on TV entitled “Youは何しに日本へ” You wa nani shi ni nihon e – Why did you come to Japan? Japanese people are fascinated in why people take the trouble to travel to Japan. Perhaps this is something to do with the fact that Japanese people are interested in how their country is perceived abroad and what might be interesting or attractive to foreigners. When replying say your reason + tame which means the reason why you did something. For example: はじめて日本に来た時は日本語を勉強するためでした Hajimete nihon ni kita toki wa nihongo o benkyō suru tame deshita – I first came to Japan in order to study Japanese. 5: おいくつですか/ 何歳ですか Oikutsu desu ka – How old are you? This is one of those questions that some visitors to Japan might find a little surprising or rude. However, when Japanese ask what your age is, what they are really saying is “I want to know your age so I don’t speak to you with an inappropriate level of politeness”. At the same time, you are under no obligation to give your age if you feel it is too personal. Deflecting with humour usually works and you can say something like 秘密です Himitsu desu – It’s a secret. If you don’t mind giving your age, say your age + sai desu. For example 25歳です Nijuugo sai desu – I am 25. 6: 箸使えますか Hashi tsukaemasu ka – Can you use chopsticks? For a cosmopolitan westerner who is used to eating Chinese or Vietnamese food at home,





Podcast 09: Just the dialogues
Apr 12 2017 18 mins  
These are the dialogues for podcast #09 ““How to order Sushi at a Japanese Restaurant” In this week’s podcast Yoshiko and Alex discuss useful Japanese vocabulary and cultural points and advice for ordering sushi at a Japanese restaurant like a native. The good news is you don’t have to learn a huge amount of vocabulary to order your your favorite dishes if you learn just a few useful key phrases. Sushi Vocabulary 大将 Taishō – (Sushi) chef サーモン Saamon – Salmon マグロ Maguro – Tuna たまご Tamago – Egg 雲丹 Uni – Sea urchin いくら Ikura – Salmon roe 貫 Kan – Counter for sushi 一貫 Ikkan – 1 piece of sushi 二貫 Nikan – 2 pieces 三貫 Sankan – 3 pieces 一貫ずつ Ikkan zutsu – One piece of each お願いします Onegaishimasu – Please さび抜き Sabinuki – Without wasabi あがり一丁 Agari ichō – Tea できますか Dekimasu ka – Can you make it? お冷や Ohiya – Cold water お椀 Owan – Soup 茶碗蒸し Chawan Mushi – Egg and custard dish えんがわ Engawa – Fin of flounder (flatfish) ごちそうさまでした Gochisōsama deshita – That was delicious 回転寿し Kaitenzushi – Conveyor belt sushi お腹いっぱい Onaka ippai – I’m full 刺身 Sashimi – Slices of fish 寿司 Sushi – Slices of fish on rice つまみ Tsumami – Used when ordering just the meat of the fish rather than sushi ガリ Gari – Slices of ginger in sweet vinegar Main Dialogue A: 大将!サーモン2貫ください Taishō! Saamon Ni Kan Kudasai – Chef, 2 pieces of salmon please. B: はいよ Hai yo – Yes A: 雲丹といくら1貫ずつできますか Uni to ikura Ikkan zutsu dekimasu ka – Can you do 1 sea urchin and 1 salmon roe? B: はいよ Hai yo – Yes A: さび抜きでお願いします Sabi nuki de onegaishimasu – Without wasabi please. B: はいよ Hai yo – Yes A: お腹いっぱい。大将あがり一丁 Onaka ippai. Taishō agari ichō – I’m full. Chef, 1 tea please. B: はいよ Hai yo – Yes 10 Cultural Tips for Ordering Sushi Here are 10 useful cultural points that will really help you when ordering sushi in Japan. 1. Call the Sushi chef “Taishō” When you order from a sushi chef it is custom to refer to them as 大将 – Taishō. This means various things including general, boss, cheif etc. but in this context is used specifically to adress a sushi chef. 2. Use “Kan” counter to order sushi. When counting pieces of Sushi you usually use the counter “kan”. For example: 一貫 – Ikkan – One piece of sushi 二貫 – Nikan – Two pieces of sushi 三貫 – Sankan – Three pieces of sushi 四貫 – Yonkan – Four pieces of sushi Japanese Pronunciation English 大将サーモンを一貫下さい Taishō saamon o ikkan kudasai One piece of salmon please chef 大将マグロを二貫ください Taishō maguro o nikan kudasai Two pieces of tuna please chef 大将たまごを三貫ください Taishō tamago o sankan kudasai Three piece of egg please chef 大将雲丹を四貫ください Taishō uni o yonkan kudasai Four pieces of sea urchin please chef An important thing to remember is it is not so common to order more than 2 or 3 pieces of the same type of sushi at the same time. The most common is 2貫 Nikan – two pieces of sushi. It is possible to say something like this: たまごを二貫、サーモンを二貫、マグロを二貫ください Tamago o nikan, saamon o nikan, maguro o nikan kudasai 2 pieces of egg, 2 salmon and 2 tuna please. 5) Use the word “agari” to order green tea When you want to order tea say あがり一丁 agari ichō. This is a special way to order green tea that is particular to sushi restaurants. When you order, they usually bring it to you in a cup. However, in many conveyor belt sushi restaurants it’s common to make your own tea by putting green ...




Podcast 08: Just the dialogues
Feb 01 2017 1 mins  
These are the dialogues for podcast #08: Talking about your likes and dislikes in Japanese Dialog 1 Yoshiko: ねぇ、ところで食べ物は何が好き? – Ne, tokoro de tabemono wa nani ga suki – Hey, by the way, what food do you like? Alex: そうだな、やっぱりお寿司かな? – Sō da na, yappari osushi kana – Hmm, let me see…well for me I guess it is Sushi. Yoshiko: 何のネタが一番好き? – Nan no neta ga ichiban suki – What topping do you like? Alex: 鮪が一番好きかも – Maguro ga ichiban suki kamo – I suppose it’s tuna. Dialog 2 Yoshiko: ねぇ、ところでスポーツは何が好き? – Ne, tokoro de supōtsu wa nani – Hey, by the way, what sport do ga suki you like? Alex: そうだな、やっぱり野球かな? – Sō da na, yappari yakyuu kana – Hmm, let me see…well for me I guess it is baseball. Yoshiko: どこのチームが一番好き? – Doko no chiimu ga ichiban suki – Which team do you like? Alex: ジャイアンツが一番好きかも。 – Jaiantsu ga ichiban suki kamo – I suppose it’s The (Tokyo) Giants. How to express how much you like or dislike things * 寿司が大好きです – Sushi ga dai suki (desu) – I love sushi * 寿司が好きです – Sushi ga suki (desu) – I like sushi. * 寿司がまあまあすきです – Sushi ga mama suki (desu) – Sushi is OK. * 寿司があんまり好きじゃない – Sushi ga amari suki ja nai – I don’t like sushi very much. * 寿司が嫌いです – Sushi ga kirai (desu) – I don’t like sushi. * 寿司が大嫌い – Sushi ga daikkirai (desu) – I hate sushi.    





Podcast 07: Just the dialogues
Nov 05 2016 1 mins  
Today’s Key phrase If you only learn one thing from this podcast, learn today’s key phrase which is: て を 貸して くれる? Can you lend me a hand? TE O KASHITE KURERU This phrase literally translates as “Could you lend me a hand?” and it has the same meaning. This is a casual level phrase used between people of similar social standing. It’s fine to use this at work with your coworkers but you might not want to use this with your boss. Even if you are a beginner in Japanese and don’t understand everything in the following dialogs don’t worry. Just try to listen out for the key phrase to get a feel of how it is used in daily conversation. You can also memorize the phrase and try to use it in real life when the opportunity arises. Even if you can’t describe exactly what it is you want help with, you can just say 手を貸してくれる and depending on the context the listener should probably be able to understand what you want. If you wanted to ask someone of high social status for help you might say something like: 手伝っていただけますか Would you help me please? Tetsudatte itadakemasu ka If you want to ask someone if they need help politely you might say: なにかお手伝いしましょうか Do you need help with anything? Nani ka otetsudai shimashōka Dialog 1 Asuka: ちょっといい? Chotto ii? Can I bother you for a minute? Alex: うん。どうした? Un. Dō shita Sure, what’s up? Asuka: このパソコンを全部会議室 へ運びたいんだけど手を貸 してくれる? Kono pasokon o zenbu kaigishitsu e hakobitain dakedo te o kashite kureru? I want to take all these PCs to the meeting room. Could you lend me a hand? Alex: うん、いいよ。 Un, ii yo. Sure. Dialog 2 Asuka: アレックス、ちょっとい い? Arekkusu, chotto ii? Alex, can I bother you for a minute? Alex: どうした? Dō shita What’s up? Asuka: 週末引越しするんだけど手 を貸してくれる? Shuumatsu hikkoshi surun dakedo te o kashite kureru? I’m moving this weekend. Could you lend me a hand? Alex: あの、今週末ちょっと髪の 毛洗わなきゃいけない Ano, konshuumatsu chotto kaminoke arawanakya ikenai Well, I have to wash my hair this weekend… Asuka: まじでお前?週末しか洗っ てないのかよ Maji de omae. Shuumatsu shika arattenai no ka yo Are you kidding me? You only wash on the weekends?! Alex: 手伝うよ Tetsudau yo I’ll help you Asuka: ありがとう Arigatō Thanks Dialog 3 Asuka: アレックス、ちょっとい い? Arekkusu, chotto ii? Alex, can I bother you for a minute? Alex: うん。どうした? Un. Dō shita Sure, what’s up? Asuka: 廊下の電球とりかえたいん だけど手を貸してくれる? Rōka no denkyuu torikaetain dakedo te o kashite kureru I want to change the lightbulb in the corridor. Could you lend me a hand? Alex: あの実は暗いところは ちょっと怖いんですけど Ano jitsu wa kurai tokoro wa kowain desu kedo Well, the thing is I’m afraid of dark places. Asuka: まじかよ?! Maji ka yo Are you serious?! Dialog 4 Asuka: アレックス、ちょっとい い? Arekkusu, chotto ii? Alex, can I bother you for a minute? Alex: うん。どうした? Un. Dō shita Sure, what’s up? Asuka: 宿題でわからないところが あるんだけど手を貸してく れる? Shukudai de wakaranai tokoro ga arun dakedo te o kashite kureru There’s something I don’t understand in my home work. Could you lend me a hand? Alex: いいよ Ii yo Sure Asuka: 本当わかるのか? Hontō wakaru no ka Do you really understand? Alex: あの、とりあえずわかるふ りをする Ano, toriaezu wakaru furi o suru Well, for now I’ll pretend to understand Dialog 5 Asuka: アレックス、ちょっとい い? Arekkusu, chotto ii? Alex, can I bother you for a minute? Alex: うん。どうした? Un. Dō shita Sure, what’s up? Asuka: 部屋を片付けたいんだけど 手を貸してくれる? Heya o katazuketain dakedo te o kashite kureru? I want to clean up the room, could you lend me a hand? Alex: 絶対やだ! Zettai yada Absolutely not! Asuka: 大きソーファがあってうご かせないの! Ōkii sōfa ga atte ugokasenai no There’s a big sofa I can’t move Alex: なんでいつもいやな仕事? Nande itsumo iya na shigoto Why is it always these sucky jobs? Asuka: アレックス手を貸してくれ るかな… Arekkusu te o kashite kureru ka na… I thought you might be able to help… Asuka: ぎっくり腰なんですよ! Gikkuri koshi nan desu yo I’ve got a strained back.



Podcast 06: Just the dialogues
Sep 01 2016 1 mins  
These are just the Japanese dialogues taken from podcast #06 “Useful Classroom Japanese Phrases” In this podcast, Asuka and I teach you some useful classroom Japanese phrases so you can interact with your teacher and understand more. We teach you how to ask questions about vocabulary and sentences. In fact, I wish I had known all this when I started to study Japanese in Tokyo all those years ago. It would have helped me learn vocabulary a lot more quickly. We also teach you how to speak in a respectful way to your Sensei. And of course you can catch up with the rest of our random banter about what’s been going on with Asuka and I recently. Japanese Pronunciation English 先生 Sensei Teacher ちょっと Chotto A little 質問 Shitsumon Question どうぞ Dōzo Please go ahead …てどういう意味ですか …te dō iu imi desu ka What does … mean? …という意味です。 …to iu imi desu It means… …でどんな文章が作るんですか? …de donna bunshō ga tsukurun desu ka What kind of sentence can you make with… 食事 Shokuji Food 残す Nokosu To leave something 彼女 Kanojo Girlfriend 振る Furu To shake / to dump someone 使える Tsukaeru To be able to use something 君 Kimi You (casual) 指輪 Yubiwa Ring Main Dialog 1 (Japanese) Student: 先生、ちょっと質問があります。 Sensei, chotto shitsumon ga arimasu. Teacher: はい、どうぞ。 Hai dōzo. Student: 「もったいない」ってどういう意味ですか? Mottainai tte dō iu imi desu ka. Teacher: それはtoo good to wasteという意味です。 Sore wa too good to waste to iu imi desu. Student: 「もったいない」で、どんな文章が作れるんですか? Mottainai de donna bunshō ga tsukurun desu ka. Teacher: 食事を残すなんてもったいない。 Shokuji o nokosu nante mottainai. Student: そのように使うんですね。わかりました。ありがとうございます。 Sono yō ni tsukaun desu ne. Wakarimashita. Arigatō gozaimasu. Main Dialog (English) Student: (Teacher) Could I just ask a question? Teacher: Yes, go ahead. Student: What does “Mottainai” mean? Teacher: “Mottainai” means too good to waste. Student: How do you use “Mottainai” in a sentence? Teacher: Leaving food is a waste (mottainai). Student: That’s how you use it! I understand. Thank you. Random Phrase – Mottainai – It’s a waste Here are some extra examples of this week’s random phrase which is “Mottainai” which means it’s such a waste. 1) 彼女を振ったなんてもったいない! Kanojo futta nante mottainai It was such a shame (waste) that you dumped your girlfriend! 2) もう新しいパソコン買うの?もったいないな、まだ使えるのに。 mō atarashii pasokon kau no. mottainai na, mada tsukaeru noni. You’re buying a new PC already? That’s a waste, you can still use the old one. 3) 君にその指輪はもったいないよ。 Kimi ni sono yubiwa mottainai yo That ring is wasted on you. For more Japanese language learning podcasts go to http://learnjapanesepod.com




Podcast 05: Just the dialogues
Mar 01 2016
These are just the Japanese dialogues taken from podcast #05 “Top 10 tips for studying Japanese” Top 10 Tips for Studying Japanese One of the most common questions I get is “I want to study Japanese but where should I start?”. The next most common question is “I’ve hit a wall with my Japanese and don’t seem to be improving, what should I do?”. So, if you are a beginner, or have already started studying Japanese but got stuck, this podcast is for YOU! Asuka and I put our heads together and came up with our top 10 tips for studying Japanese more quickly and effectively. I also wanted to make this podcast to point out that, there aren’t any magical shortcuts or secret techniques for learning to speak perfect Japanese in only a few months. A lot of websites out there would have you believe otherwise! Rather, it is more about discovering your “why” or motivation for studying Japanese. Then, you want to focus on a specific goal. In that way, you won’t waste your time studying non-essential topics and save a lot of time. Podcast Dialog Japanese Pronunciation English Asuka: おはようございます ohayō gozaimasu Good morning Alex: おはようございます ohayō gozaimasu Good morning Asuka: 昨日のパーティー楽しかったですね kinō no paatii tanoshikatta desu ne Yesterday’s party was fun Alex: 楽しかったですね tanoshikatta desu ne It was fun wasn’t it? Asuka: またやりましょう mata yarimashō Let’s do it again Alex: ぜひ! zehi Absolutely! Top 10 Tips for Studying Japanese Tip # 1 – Set a clear goal This one is pretty obvious. Before you start anything, you should set a clear goal, preferably with a deadline. This will help to really focus your studies. If you’re not sure what your goal is, simply ask yourself “why do I want to study Japanese?” Do you want to visit Japan on holiday? Do you want to be able to read your favorite manga? Or perhaps you want to become a ninja. Depending on that answer, you can focus more effectively on a study plan. That might be obvious to you but it is worth saying. And there is one more reason to have a clear goal that people sometimes forget about. And that is, setting a goal avoids wasting time studying stuff you don’t need to know. If your goal is to visit Japan for a week on holiday, then you should just be studying simple phrases for booking tickets, asking directions and perhaps shopping. You don’t need waste your time studying 2500 kanji from a dusty textbook for that. So, why do you want to study Japanese? Think about it and leave a comment below. On to the next tip. Tip # 2 – Know your everyday expressions For those of you who want to visit Japan, work here and be able to hold a conversation in Japanese, learning high frequency everyday expressions is a great place to start. You should know greetings for different times of day, asking how people are and how to say please and thank you. For example: おはようございます – ohayō gozaimasu – Good morning こんにちは – Konnichi wa – Hello (Used around midday) こんばんは– Konban wa – Good evening お元気ですか – ogenki desu ka – How are you? 元気です – I’m fine お願いします – onegai shimasu – Please (Could you do something for me?) ありがとうございます – arigatō gozaimasu – Thank you どういたしまして – dō itashi mashite – You’re welcome Tip # 3 – Learn expressions that don’t translate easily into English After learning some basic daily expressions you should learn phrases that don’t easily translate into English. In other words, learn phrases that give you a deeper insight into Japanese culture. This also helps you to stop translating words from your own language into Japanese which wastes time and makes you sound unnatural.



Podcast 04: Just the dialogues
Nov 11 2015 16 mins  
These are just the Japanese dialogues taken from podcast #04 “How to talk about your home town in Japanese” How to talk about your home town in Japanese I can guarantee you, if you are visiting or living in Japan as a foreigner, you will undoubtedly be asked 出身はどこですか – shusshin wa doko desu ka – where you are from? So Asuka and I (Alex) thought we would make this podcast to teach you how to talk about your home town with someone you have just met in Japan. This is a great way to get a conversation going and with the simple vocabulary and phrases in the podcast, you’ll learn how to do this without too much trouble. You’ll learn how to say where you are from, describe what it’s like and recommend cool places to visit. Japanese are very interested and inquisitive when it comes to finding out why a foreigner would take the time to travel all the way to Japan. Main podcast dialog A: ご出身はどこですか? shusshin wa doko desu ka Where are you from? B: ロンドンです rondon desu (It is) London A: そうですか。どんなところですか sou desu ka. donna tokoro desu ka Really? What is it like? B: 賑やかですね nigiyaka desu ne It’s lively A: おすすめな観光スポットはありますか? osusume na kankou suppoto wa arimasu ka What’s your recommendation for sightseeing? B: バキングハム宮殿がいいですね。ぜひ遊びに来てください。案内しますよ。bakinguhamu kyuuden ga ii desu ne. zehi asobi ni kite kudasai. annai shimasu yo. Buckingham Palace is good. You should visit. I’ll show you around.   For more Japanese language learning podcasts go to http://learnjapanesepod.com


Podcast 03: How to apologize in Japanese
Sep 09 2015 21 mins  
As discussed in Top 10 Etiquette Mistakes in Japan, there are two golden rules for apologising in Japanese: 1) If it’s your fault apologize. 2) If it’s not your fault, apologize. I’m half joking but Japanese people tend to apologize more frequently than westerners. As they say in Japan: とりあえず謝る – toriaezu ayamaru (Whatever happens) just apologize In this podcast, Asuka and Alex go through the basics of apologizing in Japanese in different situations and contexts. This is perhaps one of the most important skills you will learn when studying Japanese. Lesson goal In this lesson you’re going to learn some various ways to apologize in Japanese and what situations to use them in naturally. Being humble, sincere and ready to admit you are wrong are traits held in high regard in Japan. Making excuses is avoided as that can be interpreted as being selfish or childish. Japanese are also sometimes quick to apologize for the actions of others especially if they are in the same group. Some westerners might sometimes find this hard to understand however Japanese people are highly sensitive to the group dynamic and how their actions might affect others. So, let’s have a look at the most useful vocabulary and phrases for apologizing in Japanese. すみません Sumimasen This is most common way to say sorry for something. It is common for people in conversation to pronounce it “seimasen”. However, it is also useful in a variety of other situations, for example: 1) “Excuse me” if you bump into someone on the street or just a simple apology すみません – sumimasen Sorry, that was bad of me 2) Getting someone’s attention such as a waiter or when you want to ask someone directions. すみません、メニューお願いします – sumimasen, menyuu onegaishimasu Excuse me, can I have the menu please? すみません、駅はどこですか – sumimasen, eki wa doko desu ka Excuse me, where is the station? 3) Receiving something from someone A: メニューをどうぞ – menyuu o dozo B: すみません – sumimasen A: Here’s the menu B: Thanks ごめんなさい Gomen nasai “Gomen nasai” is a little less formal than “sumimasen” and can sometimes sound a little childish so it’s better to only use this with friends and not your boss or other superiors. It can also be shortened to ごめんね – gomen ne which is much more casual. When in doubt, use “sumimasen”. 申し訳ありません Mōshi wake arimasen This is a very formal phrase and is stronger than “sumimasen” and “gomen nasai”. This should be used when apologizing to superiors. As a tourist or customer, you’ll often hear this when staff apologize to you. Here are some typical uses of this phrase: 大変申し訳ありません -taihen mōushiwake arimasen I’m very sorry 遅れて申し訳ありません – okurete mōshiwake arimasen I’m sorry for being late 申し訳ありません満席です – mōshiwake arimasen manseki desu I’m sorry, the flight is full. (no seats left) 申し訳ありません満室です – mōshiwake arimasen manshitsu desu I’m sorry we don’t have any available rooms left. 失礼します Shitsurei shimasu Shitsurei literally means “rude” so when you say Shitsurei shimasu is a semi-causal way to say you are sorry. It has various uses including the following; 失礼な!– shitsurei na How rude! – Used when complaining about a rude person. 失礼します – shitsurei shimasu I’m sorry / Excuse me 失礼しました – shitsurei shimashita I’m sorry (This is usually used for something bad you did or a mistake you made) 失礼 – Shitsurei Sorry (Very casual and usually used more by men) お先に失礼します – osaki ni shitsurei shimasu May I be excused? – This is used when you are the first person to leave a social gathering or the office at the end of the day. ご迷惑 Gomeiwaku This means trouble or troublesome and although is not an apology in itself, it is used a lot with “sumimasen” and “mōushiwake arimasen” and is qu...





Podcast 02: Just the dialogues
Sep 01 2015 2 mins  
These are just the Japanese dialogues for podcast #02 “How to do a self introduction in Japanese. How to do a basic self introduction in Japanese Today’s podcast will teach you how to do a self introduction in Japanese. This is extremely useful for students who are about to start a new Japanese course at university, college or even high school. Don’t worry, although there are many ways you could do this, we’ve made you an easy template with 5 simple steps for you to use to make your own. Just change the words in blue to fit your own information. Step 1: Say your name はじめまして、ジェニファーと申します。 Hajimemashite, Jennifer to moushimasu Nice to meet you. I’m Jennifer. Step 2: Say where you’re from アメリカのカリフォルニア州から来ました。 Amerika no kariforunia shuu kara kimashita I come from California in the US Step 3: Say what your hobbies and interests are 趣味はタンゴダンスです。そして、食いしん坊です。 Shumi wa tangodansu desu. soshite kuishinbou desu My hobby is dancing tango. Also I love food. Step 4: Say you’ll do your best to study Japanese これから日本語を一所懸命勉強したいと思います。 Korekara nihongo wo isshokenmei benkyou shitai to omoimasu I want to do my best to study Japanese. Step 5: Use a natural Japanese phrase express good will and end the introduction 宜しくお願い致します。* yoroshiku onegai itashimasu I look forward to (studying) with you *This literally means “I count on your good favour in the future” but it can mean anything from “nice to meet you” to “I look forward to working/studying with you” If you listen to the podcast you can hear more examples of self introductions.



Podcast 01: Just the dialogues
Aug 25 2015 1 mins  
These are just the Japanese audio dialogues featured in podcast #01: How to ask your friends to hang out in Japanese. Us this to practice your listening and speaking skills. Here are the main dialogues used in today’s lesson: Dialogue 01 A: ね,アレックスお寿司好き B: 好き、好き A: じゃあ、明日一緒にお寿司食べに行かない B: いいね、楽しみ A: Ne, arekkusu, osushi suki B: Suki suki A: Jaa, ashita issho ni osushi tabe ni ikanai ii ne. tanoshimi A: Hey Alex, do you like sushi? B: Yeah, I love it. A: OK, so do you want to get some sushi with me tomorrow? B: Sounds great, I’m looking forward to it! Dialogue 02 A: ね,アレックスしゃぶしゃぶ好き B: 好き、好き A: じゃあ、明日一緒にしゃぶしゃぶ食べに行かない B: いいね、楽しみ A: Ne, arekkusu, shabu shabu suki B: Suki suki A: Jaa, ashita issho ni osushi tabe ni ikanai ii ne. tanoshimi A: Hey Alex, do you like shabushabu? B: Yeah, I love it. A: OK, so do you want to get some shabushabu with me tomorrow? B: Sounds great. I’m looking forward to it! Dialogue 03 A: ね,アレックスビール好き B: 好き、好き A: じゃあ、明日一緒にビール飲みに行かない B: いいね、楽しみ A: Ne, arekkusu, shabu shabu suki B: Suki suki A: Jaa, ashita issho ni biiru nomi ni ikanai ii ne. tanoshimi A: Hey Alex, do you like beer? B: Yeah, I love it. A: OK, so do you want to get some beer with me tomorrow? B: Sounds great. I’m looking forward to it! Dialogue 4 A: ね,アレックス日本酒好き B: 好き、好き A: じゃあ、明日一緒に日本酒飲みに行かない B: いいね、楽しみ A: Ne, arekkusu, nihonshu suki B: Suki suki A: Jaa, ashita issho ni nihonshu nomi ni ikanai ii ne. tanoshimi A: Hey Alex, do you like nihonshu? B: Yeah, I love it. A: OK, so do you want to get some nihonshu with me tomorrow? B: Sounds great. I’m looking forward to it! Dialogue 5 A: ね,明日香,お寿司好き B: 好き、好き A: じゃあ、明日一緒にお寿司食べに行かない B: ああ、明日はちょっと忙しいかも A: じゃあ、また今度ね B: ありがとう、またね A: Ne, asuka, osushi suki B: Suki suki A: Jaa, ashita issho ni osushi tabe ni ikanai aa, ashita wa chotto isogashii kamo jaa, mata kondo ne B: Arigatou, mata ne A: Hey Asuka, do you like sushi? B: Yeah, I love it. A: OK, so do you want to get some sushi with me tomorrow? B: Ah, actually, tomorrow’s a little difficult for me A: OK, next time B: Thanks, next time


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