Family Tree Magazine Podcast

Nov 17 2020 40 mins 223

Hear about the best genealogy tools and tips directly from Family Tree Magazine‘s editors and experts! Tune in to the Family Tree Magazine Podcast for a dose of genealogy education and fun.





Researching Mayflower Connections – An Interview with Chris Child: Episode 143
Nov 17 2020 49 mins  
Chris Child, editor of the Mayflower Descendant journal, joins Lisa to discuss strategies genealogists can use to discover their connection to the Mayflower passengers. Plus, our DNA expert is back to talk about how to understand missing or unexpected matches in your DNA test results, and much more! Ep. 143: November 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (01:20) Lisa shares Family Tree Podcast listener Charlene Jassim’s story of how she learned more about her ancestors by talking to their neighbors. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview: Chris Child (03:36) According to the General Society of Mayflower Descendants an estimated 35 million people worldwide are believed to be descended from the passengers of the Mayflower which arrived in New England in November of 1620. Chris Child of the New England Historic Genealogical Society is the author of the article “Pilgrim’s Pride” (November/December 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine). He joins Lisa Louise Cooke in this episode to help us celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s landing and discover how our family lines might connect to the famous voyage. Chris Child has worked for New England Historic Genealogical Society (American Ancestors) since 1997. He has edited the genetics and genealogy column of American Ancestors magazine, and has edited the Mayflower Descendant journal since 2016. He has lectured on these topics and others, and is the author, editor, or co-author of six books. He also frequently writes for the blog Vita Brevis. Find the Family Tree Magazine November/December 2020 digital issue here. How to Research Mayflower Ancestors DNA Deconstructed: How to Understand Missing or Unexpected Matches (13:00) Sometimes your DNA matches don’t quite match what you expected. Maybe you and your mom don’t have all the DNA matches you expected, or you can’t find a particular surname among your matches. In this month’s episode Your DNA Guide, Diahan Southard, is here to break down why this might be the case—and what to do if a relative isn’t actually related to you like you thought they were. DNA Q&A: How to Understand Missing or Unexpected Matches Best Genealogy Websites: Ohio Memory (20:17) In the November 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine, we crisscross the country to bring you the 75 Best State Genealogy Websites. From the great state of Ohio comes

Decoding Grave Symbols – An Interview with Joy Neighbors: Episode 142
Oct 19 2020 39 mins  
Author Joy Neighbors joins Lisa to talk about cemetery research and how you can use gravestone symbols to discover more about your ancestors. Plus, our DNA experts discusses testing deceased relatives and we explore strategies for success on Find a Grave. Ep. 142: October 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (01:15) Lisa shares Family Tree Podcast listener Devin Meireles’s story of his grandfather Manuel De Lima Meireles and the family’s Portuguese-Canadian roots. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview: Joy Neighbors (05:27) A walk through a cemetery when researching ancestors can be a little haunting, and yet a beautiful and reflective experience. Aside from the names, birthdates, and death dates, there are sometimes clues and even secrets embedded in tombstones. Joy Neighbors, author of the book The Family Tree Cemetery Field Guide: How to Find, Record, and Preserve Your Ancestors’ Graves helps us decode the mystery of grave stone symbols. Joy neighbors and Lisa Louise Cooke. A bit of history about symbols: * Puritans started adding skulls and cross bones to tombstones.* In the 18th century the grim reaper became popular and was perhaps meant to instill the fear of God in those left behind.* In the 19th century Victorians loved including secret messages on tombstones. The Hidden Meanings of Common Gravestone Symbols DNA Deconstructed: Testing Someone Who Has Passed Away (16:10) We don’t always get a chance get a parent’s DNA tested before they pass. Your DNA Guide Diahan Southard is here to explain your testing options. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/dna-test-parent-passed-away/ Best Genealogy Websites: Find a Grave (22:52) Find a Grave is home to the world’s largest collection of gravestone records — and it’s all free. Author Sunny Morton provides tips for using Find a Grave to build a bigger, better family tree. * See what a name search reveals.* Look for other relatives buried nearby.* Harvest historical evidence.* Learn more about the cemetery.* Thank volunteers and collaborate with relatives.* Add what you know.* Leave a personal memento. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/find-a-grave/ Editor’s Desk (34:19) Family Tree Magazine editor Andrew Koch gives us a sneak peek at the November / December 2020 issue of the magazine which includes an article on the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower landing and the new 75 Best State Websites list. Upcoming Family Tree University courses: * Master Ancestry.com in 4 Weeks* Get Started with DNA* Exploring German Geneal...


What Will Genealogy Look Like Post COVID-19?: Episode 141
Sep 15 2020 37 mins  
In this month’s episode, Lisa talks with genealogist and librarian Daniel Klein about how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected genealogy research and what genealogy will look like in the future. Plus, our DNA expert is back with tips on ethnicity estimates, and Lisa shares some of her favorite genealogy apps. Ep. 141: September 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (01:14) Listener Jason Burt’s grandfather was a Julliard trained trumpet player and a music teacher much of his life, playing in the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra. Jason explains how his grandfather brought his music with him while he served in the military. “During WWII, he was the lead trumpet player of an Army Air Force HQ band stationed in the Philippines. Before the war ended, this 20-piece orchestra recorded themselves playing 10 chart topping big band songs of the time period. My grandpa was permitted to have these recordings by his Commanding Officer and he brought them home. My grandparents have both passed away and I recently inherited all my grandpa’s military belongings. He thought he lost these recordings in the 80s; however, I discovered them while going through his attic.” Jason shares a fascinating project that he’s working on in hopes of bringing the sounds of the past to the present. You can learn more by following Jason on Twitter @746thFEAFband. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview: Daniel Klein (03:13) Daniel Klein is a librarian at the Jersey City Free Public Library’s New Jersey Room and is a founding member and past president of the Hudson County Genealogical and Historical Society.He writes Tracing Your Roots, a monthly genealogy column for The Jersey Journal, where he was a reporter and editor prior to becoming a librarian. Read his article, “What will genealogy look like post COVID-19?” at the Jersey Journal. DNA Deconstructed: All About Ethnicity Estimates (18:06) In today’s episode, Your DNA Guide Diahan Southard tackles a common question that people have when deciding where to test:  Which DNA testing company has the best ethnicity estimates? DNA Q&A: All About Ethnicity Estimates Best Genealogy Apps (22:42) Lisa Louise Cooke, host of the Family Tree Magazine podcast and author of the book Mobile Genealogy discusses the following three free apps available in your app store.

Becoming a Professional Genealogist – An Interview with Diana Elder (AG) and Nicole Dyer: Episode 140
Aug 18 2020 40 mins  
Mother-and-daughter genealogy team Diana Elder (AG) and Nicole Dyer join Lisa to discuss the process of becoming a professional genealogist. Our DNA expert Diahan provides organizational strategies for DNA matches, and author Rick Crume gives us a closer look at the digitized newspapers available on GenealogyBank. Ep. 140: August 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:33) Lisa shares Family Tree Magazine fan Frances Sheldrick’s story of surprising genealogical discovery that led to new-found cousins. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview: Diana Elder and Nicole Dyer of Family Locket (4:35) If you are passionate about genealogy, it may have crossed your mind to go professional. One of the first things to consider is getting credentialed. Professional genealogists Diana Elder and Nicole Dyer discuss certification options and what you can expect from the process. For more, see the article “Hanging Your Shingle” in the July / August 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine, or view it below. Genealogical certifications * Accredited Genealogist credential (AG®) is offered by ICAPGen (testing-based). Approximately $300* Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG): Certified Genealogist (CG) (portfolio-based). Approximately $375* Council for the Advanced of Forensic Genealogy (FCG)   How to Earn Professional Genealogy Credentials DNA Deconstructed: Organizing DNA Results and Matches (20:15) When you take a DNA test you are hoping for answers, but often the results generate more questions. In this episode genetic genealogist and author Diahan Southard provides an answer to one of the most common questions: how do I organize test results from multiple companies? Websites mentioned in this interview * GEDmatch* Genome Mate Organizational tips from Diane * Use your testing companies note feature.* Formulate a good question first: “The best organization tool is a question.”* Find your best matches that fit the question you want to answer.* Start with a known match. DNA Q&A: Organizing Your DNA Matches in 3 Steps Best Genealogy Websites: GenealogyBank (25:27) Author Rick Crume gives us the scoop on getting the most from the digitized newspaper website Genea...

A Closer Look at NBC’s “Roots Less Traveled” – An Interview with Host Faruq Tauheed: Episode 139
Jul 15 2020 42 mins  
Lisa interviews Faruq Tauheed, host of the NBC TV series “Roots Less Traveled” about the show and his own genealogy journey. Plus, highlights from the 101 Best Websites for Genealogy and a look at the burgeoning market of health-focused DNA tests. Ep. 139: July 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:23) Lisa shares Family Tree Podcast listener Margaret Cline Harmon’s story of how she used her genealogy skills to help her mother piece her history together. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview: Faruq Tauheed from NBC’s “Roots Less Traveled” (4:47) Faruq Tauheed is the host of the NBC TV series “Roots Less Traveled.” He joins Lisa to talk about the show and his personal introduction to genealogy. Want to add your voice to the call for a second season? You can find “Roots Less Traveled” on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Farug Tauheed, host of the genealogy show “Roots Less Traveled” from NBC. Best Genealogy Websites (18:10) Author David Fryxell is back at the microphone to share some of the highlights from the new 101 Best Websites for Genealogy list. You can find the 101 Best Websites for Genealogy online, or in the July/August 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Websites mentioned in this interview: * The Life Writer* Genealogy Gems* One-Step Webpages* Behind the Name* The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries* Mapire 101 Best Genealogy Websites of 2020 DNA Deconstructed: Genetic Communities (26:17) Diahan Southard provides insight into the types of DNA health tests available, the potential implications for insurance, and the importance of reading the terms of service and privacy. Learn more about The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) of 2008.

Simple Steps to Practical Genealogy – An Interview with Brian Sheffey: Episode 138
Jun 17 2020 42 mins  
Lisa interviews Brian Sheffey, author of the book Practical Genealogy: 50 Simple Steps to Research Your Diverse Family History. Listen for practical tips you can apply to your genealogy research, plus the latest edition of our 101 Best Websites for Genealogy and much more. Ep. 138: June 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:23) Family Tree Magazine podcast listener Pat R. shares a bit of her genealogical journey. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Featured Interview: Simple Steps to Practical Genealogy (2:54) Author Brian Sheffey shares tips from his new book Practical Genealogy: 50 Simple Steps to Research Your Diverse Family History. For more information about Brian and his book, be sure to check out his website. Practical Genealogy: 50 Simple Steps to Research Your Diverse Family History, by Brian Sheffey. DNA Deconstructed (15:22) Our DNA expert Diahan Southard joins Lisa to talk about your DNA matches and how to decide which ones to focus on. Diahan’s got a new book out perfect for those looking to get started researching DNA. Check out Your DNA Guide – the Book. 3 Steps for Prioritizing Which DNA Matches to Research First Best Genealogy Websites (25:20) James Beidler, author of the book Trace Your German Roots Online returns to the podcast to provide you with a wealth of German genealogy resources from his article Sturn und Drang featured in the May / June 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine. German Websites Mentioned in this Interview * Archion.de* Matricula.eu*

How to Capture Family Stories Before They’re Lost – An Interview with Rachael Rifkin: Episode 137
May 20 2020 42 mins  
This episode, Lisa talks with author Rachael Rifkin about preserving our family history before it’s lost to time. Plus: some great online writing tools and pointers from our DNA expert on opting in (or out) of DNA research studies. Ep. 137: May 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (01:35) Listener Jennifer Reyes shares what she discovered about her ancestors known as the Potato Germans of Denmark. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] with “Tree Talk” in the subject line. Rachel Rifkin on Capturing Family Stories (05:05) Lisa talks with author Rachel Rifkin about her Good Housekeeping article called We’re Losing Generations of Family History Because We Don’t Share Our Stories. Rachel share her ideas on how to get your kids, siblings, and parents talking. Need some inspiration for your family history interview? Check out the article below for some questions to get you started. 20 Family History Interview Questions DNA Deconstructed: Opting into DNA Research Studies (15:55) In today’s DNA Deconstructed segment, Your DNA Guide, Diahan Southard joins Lisa to explain what DNA research studies are and your options for opting in or opting out. Should You Opt In to DNA Research Studies? Best Genealogy Websites: Writing Your Family’s Story (24:55) Getting started writing family stories is arguably one of the most-popular genealogy goals, and yet one that can so easily fall prey to procrastination. Thankfully, it’s easier than ever to save and preserve our precious family memories online. Whether you want to document the important moments in your own life or remember the lives of your ancestors, author Lisa Alzo has some of the latest websites and apps to make writing and sharing family stories a snap. Websites mentioned in this interview: * Scrivener* Day One* Hemingway Editor* Write or Die 2 Online Family History Writing Tools and Storytelling Websites Editor’s Desk (37:14) Amanda Epperson, the eLearning Producer at Family Tree University shares some terrific new opportunities f...

How DNA Tests Shape Our Idea of Family – An Interview with Libby Copeland: Episode 136
Apr 17 2020 38 mins  
This month Lisa interviews author Libby Copeland on her new book The Lost Family and discusses how consumer DNA tests are changing the way we think of family relationships. Plus: a look at the reliability of DNA, free DNA websites and more. Ep. 136: April 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:35) Listener and author Barb Baltrinic shares her DNA story. You can find her book Maternal Failure on Amazon. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Feature Interview with Author Libby Copeland (3:09) Lisa talks with award-winning journalist Libby Copeland about her new book, The Lost Family (Abrams Press). This book focuses on the impact of consumer DNA tests on our families and explores the question: How much our genes should get to tell us about who we are? The Lost Family (Abrams Press; March 3, 2020; U.S. $27.00; Hardcover) about DNA and its impact on genealogy and society. Sponsor Spotlight: Tag That Photo (14:07) This episode was brought to you by Tag That Photo, an AI facial recognition technology that enhances identifying family members when archiving photo catalogs. It’s a great resource to speed along your photo organizing as you tell your Family Tree story. Lisa’s guest is April Ganong of Tag That Photo. You can learn more by visiting their website at TagThatPhoto.com. New Identification Technology for Digital Photos DNA Deconstructed: The Reliability of DNA (22:00) In this month’s DNA Deconstructed segment, Your DNA Guide, Diahan Southard joins Lisa to answer one of the most fundamental and commonly asked questions about DNA: How reliable is it? For more information, check out Diahan’s article below! How Reliable is the Information from DNA Tests? Best Genealogy Websites: Top Free Websites for Research (29:46) We’re all familiar with the websites and companies that offer DNA testing, but there are many other related sites you can turn to after you get your results. Genetic genealogists Blaine Bettinger shares some of the best websites for maximizing your testing dollars and getting the most useful genealogical information out of your results! Websites mentioned in this interview:

Unusual and Underused Records for Researching Female Ancestors: Episode 135
Mar 18 2020 41 mins  
Join Lisa and her guests as she discusses unusual and underused records for researching your female ancestors. Plus: Dutch genealogy websites, genetic communities, and a few great genealogy accounts to follow on social media. Ep. 135: March 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:35) Lisa shares Family Tree Podcast listener Holly Simpson Corley’s story about an unexpected discovery made in her own hometown. Thanks for sharing, Holly! Want to share your story on the podcast? Connect with us on Facebook or email [email protected] with “Tree Talk” in the subject line. Letter telling the story of Holly’s ancestor, Miss Elisabeth Simpson. Feature Interview: Unusual Records for Finding Female Ancestors (7:10) Courtney Henderson, Digital Editor at Family Tree Magazine, has some unusual places for us to search for our female ancestors from her Premium article, “14 Unusual Records for Finding Female Ancestors.” Record Collections Mentioned Eugenics Record Office Records Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Archives: A list of collections and which institutions hold them. Notices Repudiating Wives’ Debts “For more than 300 years,” notes Hilary Sargent in an article for the Boston Globe, “newspapers ran advertisements from men publicly announcing their wives had left them, and that they would no longer ‘be responsible for her debts.’” As early as 1656, newspapers printed these notices, and the practice continued well into the 1980s.  Look for these notices in the classified ads section of newspapers, sometimes under the heading “Special Notices.” Female Clubs, Organizations and Sisterhoods Beginning in 2003, the YWCA donated over one million photographs, publication pages, and rolls of microfilm to the Sophia Smith Collection of Women’s History at Smith College in Northhampton, Mass. Thanks to a grant from the Council on Library Information and Resources these records have been digitized and are available for researchers. For more information, you can visit the library’s website. 14 Unusual Records for Finding Female Ancestors...

How to Research Enslaved Ancestors: Episode 134
Feb 19 2020 34 mins  
This month, Lisa is joined by contributing editor Sunny Morton to discuss key strategies for researching enslaved African American ancestors. Plus, a quick tutorial on RootsTech apps from FamilySearch’s Jen Allen, tips for deciphering shared matches in your DNA and much more. Ep. 134: February 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: How I Did It, With Kenyatta D. Berry (1:15) Kenyatta D. Berry shares how she used newspapers to build a family history story. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] How I Did It: Used Newspapers to Build the Story of my Ancestor’s Life How to Research African American Slave Ancestors (4:00) Contributing editor Sunny Morton shares a few tips from her article in Family Tree Magazine, “Trace Your African-American Slave Ancestors,” co-written with Deborah A. Abbott, Ph.D. Sunny also discusses several exciting new African American resources coming online: * Smithsonian Magazine has announced the arrival of a new website. Enslaved: People of the Historic Slave Trade is set to launch in Spring 2020.* The free genealogy website FamilySearch has recently added or updated over 30 historical record collections with relevance to African American genealogy. Trace Your African-American Slave Ancestors DNA Deconstructed (14:25) Your DNA Guide Diahan Southard is back to explore three problems with shared DNA matches, including when your matches aren’t actually related. Is It Possible My DNA Matches Aren’t Related? Best Genealogy Websites (21:23) Lisa chats with Jen Allen, Director of Events at FamilySearch, to talk about how you can use the RootsTech website and app for a great experience at the conference. RootsTech Apps: * The RootsTech app (Android)* The RootsTech app (iOS) RootsTech 2020...


Timeless Strategies for Genealogy Research Success: Episode 133
Jan 17 2020 49 mins  
In this episode, founding Family Tree Magazine editor David A. Fryxell reflects on the past 20 years in the genealogy world and shares his favorite timeless genealogy problem-solving strategies. Ep. 133: January 2020 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:03) For this month’s episode of Tree Talk, David Fryxell, author of the new book, The Family Tree Scandinavian Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Ancestors in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway shares how he tracked down his ancestor in Swedish Household Examination books. Share your story of discovery and you may just hear it here on the Family Tree Magazine Podcast! Email your story to: [email protected] Read David’s Article: How I Did It: Tracked Down my Ancestor in Swedish Household Examination Books Timeless Strategies for Genealogy Research (5:18) David Fryxell joins Lisa to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Family Tree Magazine and cover some timeless family history tips for good research. Back in the year 2000, Google was just a start-up, 16-year-old Mark Zuckerberg hadn’t even invented Facebook yet, and genealogy websites like MyHeritage and Findmypast were years away from launching. But genealogy was gaining in popularity and David Fryxell, who was also the founding editorial director of Family Tree Magazine was convinced there were no signs of it slowing down. And it certainly hasn’t. But with all the advances and technological changes, the core of good genealogy research remains the same. Read David Fryxell’s article “The Roaring Twenties” in the Jan / Feb 2020 issue of Family Tree Magazine.  DNA Deconstructed (21:23) Your DNA Guide Diahan Southard returns to the show to talk about the history of GEDmatch and the acquisition by the forensic DNA company, Verogen. Best Genealogy Websites (36:40) It’s a new year and if you’re going to hold a family reunion this summer, it’s probably time to start planning now! Contributing Editor Sunny Morton returns to the show to talk about the top tech tools for family reunions from her new article, Coming Together. Sunny recommends the following websites for managing invitations to your family reunion: * Facebook* Evite*

The Best State Websites for Genealogy: Episode 132
Dec 16 2019 38 mins  
Join Lisa and her guests for an update on Family Tree Magazine’s new edition of the best state websites for genealogy! Plus, a 2019 year in review and a look forward at what’s to come in 2020. Ep. 132: December 2019 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:20) Lisa shares a research success story from the genealogy community in Tree Talk. This month, professional genealogist Rich Venezia shares how he used Civil War pension index cards to solve a family mystery. Online Article: How I Did It: Found Answers in Civil War Pension Index Cards by Rich Venezia. Professional genealogist, Rich Venezia. 2019 Genealogy Year in Review, Plus a Look at 2020 (5:55) Family Tree Magazine editor Andrew Koch joins Lisa for a recap of what’s happened in the world of genealogy in 2019. He also shares what he sees on the horizon for 2020 including: * Family Tree Magazine’s 20th anniversary. The Jan/Feb issue includes our 20 best tips from the last two decades, plus tips for whipping your genealogy into shape and 14 underused records for finding female ancestors. * Companies and conferences heavily focus on telling your ancestors’ stories. Conference themes: RootsTech 2020: “The Story of You” (keynote speaker David Kennerly, Pulitzer-winning photographer); NGS 2020 “Echoes of Our Ancestors” * More international conferences: MyHeritage LIVE in Israel (where Lisa Louise Cooke will be speaking), and the possibility of a second international RootsTech. Andrew Koch, Editor of Family Tree Magazine. DNA Deconstructed (13:53) DNA expert Diahan Southard brings some clarity to the topic of DNA triangulation. Online Article: Tips for Triangulating Your DNA Matches. Our DNA expert, Diahan Southard. The 75 Best State Genealogy Websites (19:46) We take a look at some of the best genealogy websites that you’re going to want to focus on in the new year ahead with Rick Crume, author of our “75 Best Websites” article entitled All-Americans. Here are the websites mentioned by Rick in this episode: East Coast Best Websites NEW YORK: German and Italian Genealogy Groups

Picture-Perfect Photo Books: Episode 131
Nov 25 2019 38 mins  
The podcast is back and better than ever with new tips, tricks and interviews with the experts. Join Lisa as she tackles perfect photo books and much more. Ep. 131: November 2019 Back to the episode list In this episode: Tree Talk (1:35) This month’s question: Do you have an interesting story that was uncovered during genealogy research? Helen responded to our prompt by sharing the surprising discoveries she made while visiting the Warren County PA historical society. “It was a surprise when I found it took us back to the Revolutionary War and the 7th Great grandfather was the only one arrested for the Boston Tea Party. I had to verify this, and it is on the web page for the Tea Party museum.”Reader Helen via email Thanks to Helen for sharing, and keep an eye out for upcoming Tree Talk questions on the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page! Picture Perfect Photo Books (4:38) In this episode we are featuring an article from the December 2019 issue of Family Tree Magazine that is guaranteed to help you put a smile on your family’s face. It’s called Picture Perfect Photo Books, and the article’s author, Sunny Morton, explains how to save and share your memories with a family photo book. Online Article: Creating a Family Photo Book: The 5 Elements to Include DNA Deconstructed: Handling Sensitive Information (14:01) Some of the most personal, sensitive or unique information that exists about us is our DNA. And with the popularity of DNA testing for genealogical purposes, more and more people are facing delicate and sensitive interpersonal situations. DNA expert Diahan Southard shares tips on handling sensitive genetic information. Online Article: DNA Q&A: Handling Sensitive Information Best Genealogy Websites & Stories from the Stacks (22:16) Featuring: The New England Historic Genealogical Society Library and American Ancestors website. Claire Vail is the Director of Creative and Digital Strategy for the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and the leader and visionary behind the website’s new content, growth, and development for the past five years. She’s the individual behind the recent new website developments of the Historic Catholic Records Online Project, which was created in collaboration with the Catholic Archdiocese of Bo...

Online Records Roundup: Episode 130
Mar 01 2019 49 mins  
Discover valuable resources for online records with this month’s genealogy podcast. Ep. 130: March 2019 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History with Andrew Koch FDR delivers his first “fireside chat” on the radio, Mar. 12, 1933 This month in 1933: Just eight days after his inauguration (in which he famously said “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”), President Franklin Delano Roosevelt took to the airwaves in the first of his fireside chats. In the 13-minute-and-42-second address, Roosevelt explained the basics of the banking crisis two weeks prior, and outlined what his administration was doing to prevent the crisis from getting worse. Sources: * FDR Library* White House Historical Association* FDR Library* Wikipedia Naturalization Records Online Rich Venezia, founder of Rich Roots Genealogy joins Lisa to discuss finding naturalization records online. Rich is the founder of Rich Roots Genealogy. He specializes in 20th-century immigrant ancestry, and he assists clients with dual citizenship applications for Ireland and Italy. He’s a proud Italian dual citizen and spoke about “How to Grow Empathy From Uncovering Your Roots” at TEDx Pittsburgh 2017. He was a member of the research team of the PBS TV show Genealogy Roadshow for two seasons and consulted on The Travel Channel’s Follow Your Past. DNA Deconstructed: GEDMatch and Genesis Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett guides you through the GEDmatch migration to Genesis. To learn more about the new site, check out these tutorials: * Time to move to Genesis!* GEDmatch Genesis Tutorials for Beginners* Tips for using GEDmatch Best Genealogy Websites Family Tree University instructor Donna Moughty tells us about one of her favorite website’s for Irish records online, John Grenham’s website Irish Ancestors. Stories from the Stacks In this episode, we virtually roam the aisles of the Houston TX Public Library’s Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research. Susan Kaufman is the Senior Manager there and she has more than 30 years of experience as a genealogy librarian. Susan is a genealogy conference speaker and currently serves as the Texas State Genealogical Society’s Director of Education. * Visit Houston Library.* Click Locations and Hours* Scroll down and click Clayton Library Center for Genealogical Research* Click the red button Clayton Library’s Collections and Services* Scroll down and cli...

Gain Major Genealogy Problem-solving Skills: Episode 129
Feb 19 2019 42 mins  
Add these genealogy problem-solving tricks and strategies to your research arsenal with this February 2019 podcast. Ep. 129: February 2019 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History with Andrew Koch After six months of fighting, the Japanese finally surrendered the island of Guadalcanal, one of the Solomon Islands, on Feb. 9. The Allied victory marked a turning point in the Pacific campaign of World War II. Along with the Battle of Midway in June 1942, the Battle of Guadalcanal set the Japanese on their back heels and hindered their further expansion. For the rest of the war, Japan was on the defensive. Life on the island during the battle had been bleak. Allied soldiers struggled in the hot and humid climate, and tropical diseases such as malaria sidelined as many as two-thirds of Allied divisions at a time. Regular Japanese bombardment kept Allied troops from feeling truly secure in the drawn-out campaign. How to find the records You can request World War Two service records (called Official Military Personnel Files) from the National Archives. A 1973 fire at a records center in St. Louis destroyed 75 to 80 percent of Army and Air Force personnel records. However, you can still find World War II army enlistment records online at the National Archives’ Access to Archival Databases. Sources: * Brittanica.com* National WW2 Museum* Archives.gov* Wikipedia.org Genealogy Problem-solving with Cluster Genealogy Deborah A. Abbott, Ph.D. joins Lisa to discuss a powerful problem-solving reearch technique called Cluster Research. Cluster research is the practice of searching beyond your ancestor. By researching the friends, neighbors, and associates of your ancestor, you may uncover new leads and new connections that can solve brick walls. Deborah Abbott, PhD is a professional genealogist, specializing in genealogical methodology, manuscript collections and African American family research. A Trustee on the Board of the Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS), she is also a member of the Cuyahoga County Ohio Archives Advisory Commission, and of the Board of Directors for the Federation of Genealogy Societies (FGS). Moreover, Dr. Abbott is an affiliate with the Kentucky-Tennessee Associates, past president of the African American Genealogical Society, Cleveland, Ohio and a retired professor of Counseling from Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland. She holds both the BS and M.Ed. degrees from Tuskegee University in Alabama and the PhD degree from Kent State University in Ohio. Want to see Dr. Abbott put cluster research in action? Join the 2019 Spring Virtual Conference, where you’ll get access to a brand-new presentation from Dr. Abbott, along with 15 other videos, live Q&As, and activities galore to help you with your problem-solving.

Make 2019 Your Most Organized Year Yet: Episode 128
Jan 18 2019 43 mins  
Get the key genealogy organization tricks to make 2019 your best year yet. Ep. 128: January 2019 Back to the episode list In this episode: You’ll love all of the genealogy organization tricks and techniques contained in this podcast episode, designed to help you make 2019 your best year yet. This Month in Family History Editor Andrew Kock shares a brief history of Ellis Island This month in 1892: Ellis Island opened its gates for the first time. Irish teenager Annie Moore became the first immigrant to pass through the port. Over the next 62 years, Ellis Island processed more than 12 million immigrants, making it the largest port of immigration in the country. Ellis Island served as a replacement to Castle Garden, which had been used by the New York State government to process immigrants since 1855. The federal government recognized Castle Garden’s facilities were inadequate, and so set out to build a larger station to meet the demand. Ellis Island closed in 1954. Now, the immigration center is a museum operated by the Liberty Ellis Foundation. Visitors to the museum can view the island’s facilities and learn about the immigration process, plus find records of their ancestors who stepped off ships in the island’s port. You can also search a database of Ellis Island passengers at LibertyEllisFoundation.org Sources: Ellis Island HistoryHuffington Post articleCastle Gardens Get more tips for searching New York passenger lists. Feature Author, Family Tree University instructor, and genealogical researcher Gena Philibert-Ortega discusses why research logs matter, how they can keep you organized and why they aren’t as boring as you think! Tools mentioned for research logs: * Excel* Evernote* Trello DNA Deconstructed Randy Majors walks us through his website U.S. County Boundary Maps. Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett guides you on how to simplify and organize your DNA test results. Organizing your DNA results really is not complicated. Just like all other forms of organization for genealogy research, it simply takes time, patience, and the commitment to keep it up. It helps to understand that being organized will help you with your analysis and keep you on track for your DNA research goals. Most of you will want to organize and track the same types of items. For example: * Testing information* Matches* Contact information Your project — or what you want to do with the DNA results you are collecting — will determine how you...

The 2018 Genealogy Year in Review: Episode 127
Dec 19 2018 28 mins  
2018 has been a busy year in the genealogy world! We’re wrapping it up with a recap, and chatting about what we look forward to in 2019. Join us! Ep. 127: December 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History Andrew covers the history of the Monroe Doctrine. This month in 1823: US President James Monroe declared that any attempt by a European power to create new colonies in the Western Hemisphere would be considered a hostile act against the United States. The proclamation, given before Congress on Dec. 2, 1823, became known as the Monroe Doctrine. As part of this new foreign policy, the United States vowed to respect existing European colonies in the region and not to interfere in wars between European powers. The declaration reinforced the separation between the New and Old Worlds, and also left the door open for the United States to continue expanding west without fear of competition from other world powers. The policy change came shortly after most countries in Central and South America gained their independence from Spain. Monroe and his secretary of state, John Quincy Adams, were concerned that Spain (along with France) would attempt to recolonize the region. And so, they decided to firmly assert the United States’ role as protectorate of the Western Hemisphere. Feature The Biggest DNA Development / Trends for 2018 The biggest development in the field was the use of DNA and genealogy to solve cold case crimes across the US. Leaving your personal feelings and the ethical debate behind, bringing the use of genealogy coupled with genetics to the attention of the public had an amazing effect. I answered many questions from people who had never thought about genealogy before who were now intrigued by what their DNA, and their genealogy, held. When I was recently in Glasgow, Scotland I talked to a group of people at a local café about DNA testing for a good hour. Regular people are picking up DNA testing kits out of curiosity, and many I found out are eager to learn about cousins over here. With ancestry DNA tests available in 36 countries the trend in making contacts with distant cousins can only increase. Last spring DNA Painter made a splash with its incredible website. For those who have not heard of it before, this website allows you to “paint” your chromosome with segments as you identify them. The process gives you a colorful chart of ancestral DNA segments which can be helpful as you identify other descendants of common ancestors. Plus, you can figure out exactly which bits of you came from whom. The most recent development in 2018 came in November from Genetic Affairs. This program takes your results from AncestryDNA, FamilyTreeDNA, and 23andMe, collates your matches, and then emails them to you. Then there is the AutoClustering function that many people have lost their minds over. While this portion of the site is not free, it shows the user a graphic of all three-way matches in your list. This is not verified triangulation, but you can figure that out easily enough. Just be warned, some people have lost whole weekends playing with the software! Finally, MyHeritage held an all genetic genealogy conference...

Exploring Your UK Ancestry: Episode 126
Nov 27 2018 39 mins  
This episode is all about UK ancestry. Lisa and her guests discuss the best UK websites, the genes that make up the British Isles, and much more! Ep. 126: November 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History Andrew provides a quick look at a major event that impacted your family history: the end of World War I. Feature Author Rick Crume explains how researching your family history in England and Wales has never been easier. Rick shares some of the reasons why from his new upcoming article in Family Tree Magazine. Rick’s website recommendations: FreeRegThis terrific site provides free access to transcribed baptism, marriage and burial records from parish registers, nonconformist records and other sources. Operated by volunteers and regularly updated, FreeReg has more than 40 million records from across the United Kingdom. FamilySearch Research WikiMade up of articles contributed by the public, the Research Wiki has especially useful guides to family history research in England and Wales. GENUKIProvides extensive information on genealogy resources for the United Kingdom and Ireland. The church database can pinpoint a parish on a map or produce a list of nearby parishes. Once you find your ancestors in one parish, you might work outward in the surrounding parishes to find other references to the family. The homepage also has links to family history societies. DNA Deconstructed Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett discusses genes that make up the British Isles. In July 2016 a study reported that there were 26 ethnicities going back 500 years for Great Britain. Considering the global impact, the British people had on the world, is that any surprise? Besides British and Irish traits, for test takers in the UK the other top percentages were Europe West, Scandinavian, and Iberian Peninsula. If we broke the study into smaller areas those numbers did change (reflecting the immigrations in and out of that area) and other ethnicities were counted such as Finland, Italy, Jewish, and Russia. Living DNA analyzes your segments looking for clues into your past allowing their computer algorithm to determine which of the 21 regions of the UK your family came from. Their program looks at linked DNA, which they refer to as “constellations” to help determine the areas your family most likely descended from. They really take into account migration history of the peoples who came to the islands into account too. That is important if you are trying to figure out why you have such a high Scandinavian percentage. Resources: DNA of the nation revealed…and we’re not as “British” as we think – Ancestry.com The first DNA test to give you a breakdown of your ancestry across the UK – LivingDNA


Genealogy Problem Solving: Episode 125
Oct 30 2018 39 mins  
Learn strategies for your biggest genealogy problems, discussing the difference between DNA types and looking at FamilySearch’s Communities. Ep. 125: October 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History Andrew brings us back in time to the Chicago Fire of 1871. If you have ancestors who lived in or around the city in the early 1870s, look for property records before and after the Fire to see how this disaster may have affected your relatives. Sources: * https://www.britannica.com/event/Chicago-fire-of-1871* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chicago_Fire* https://www.history.com/topics/19th-century/great-chicago-fire* https://www.greatchicagofire.org/great-conflagration/* https://www.thoughtco.com/the-great-chicago-fire-of-1871-1774058 Feature Do you have some problem ancestors? Family Tree Magazine Editor Diane Haddad provides strategies for finding problem ancestors: * Building out your tree by adding collateral family members* Creating a timeline* Educating yourself on locations Resource: Six Ancestors in Six Days bootcamp DNA Deconstructed Family Tree University instructor Shannon Combs-Bennett helps us understand a common problem in understanding our DNA results: Confusing mitochondrial DNA and the X-Chromosome. The X-Chromosome is one of the two sex chromosomes in our body (the other being the Y-Chromosome). A person who has an X and a Y is genetically male, and a person who has two X chromosomes is genetically female. Now, there are nuances to this due to some genetic diseases in humans, but we are going to keep this simple. During reproduction a man will pass down an X or a Y chromosome to his child where as a woman can only pass on an X. Everyone has at least one X-Chromosome. Similarly, everyone has mitochondrial DNA. A woman passes her mitochondrial DNA to all of her children. But unlike an X-Chromosome, men will not pass this information on. Mitochondrial DNA is found in the mitochondria, an organelle floating in the cytoplasm of our cells and not in the nucleus like the X-Chromosome. This is important to remember! Why is it important? Because it will help you understand how they are inherited and why they are different. You see, an egg is a cell, and as such contains all the organelles a cell needs to survive. This includes mitochondria. Inside the cell is the nucleus which contains the autosomal chromosomes and the X-chromosome a woman will pass on. Sperm, on the other hand, is a specialized cell which contains the genetic material found in a nucleus, and this does not pass on mitochondria. So, while the X-Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA can be associated with the women in your family they are inherited very differently and can tell you different information. The X-chromosome information is found with autosomal DNA data from a...

Immigration and Our Ancestors: Episode 124
Oct 02 2018 43 mins  
This month we’re discussing unusual immigration records, plus find out which websites are best for saving and sharing your research. Ep. 124: September 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History Family Tree editor Andrew Koch shares a genealogically important event that took place this month in years past – the Naturalization Act of 1906. National Archives website Feature Our guest Rich Venezia is the founder of Rich Roots Genealogy. He specializes in 20th-century immigrant ancestry, and he assists clients with dual citizenship applications for Ireland and Italy. He’s a proud Italian dual citizen, and spoke about “How to Grow Empathy From Uncovering Your Roots” at TEDx Pittsburgh 2017. He was a member of the research team of the PBS TV show Genealogy Roadshow for two seasons, and consulted on The Travel Channel’s “Follow Your Past”. Alien Registration Records Passport Applications City Marriage Returns DNA Deconstructed Shannon Combs-Bennett answers the question: “Why don’t I show DNA for a region that I know I have ancestors from?” Keep in mind that these results show you only the information you inherited from your ancestors. Due to a process called recombination, the DNA passed down to each generation is a new combination of genes and only a portion of the parent’s DNA. This means your genetic family tree and genealogical family tree will not match 100%. It all depends on what you inherited from your parents, they inherited from their parents, and so on back. Ethnicity analysis is constantly begin refined. We are lucky if you think about. As we study genealogy and genetics we are also watching science develop. As the companies learn more about ethnicity traits and control groups they put out new information on their websites. For example, AncestryDNA released new ethnicity results to their customers the beginning of September. If you test there you can compare your old results with the new ones. It is obvious by looking at them side by side how they are refining and developing the science. The take away is this: ethnicity results will only show what you inherited. Since the science is being developed and refined as we speak expect your results to change over time. Best Genealogy Websites Author Dave Fryxell shares the Best Websites for Saving and Sharing from the 101 Best Websites list. Sharing and Social Media Facebook: Recent controversies aside, the world’s biggest social-networking site can connect you with cousins as well as with your favorite genealogy institutions. GEDMatch: Sort of a matchmaking site for genetic genealogy,

Best Genealogy Websites of 2018 (Live from FGS): Episode 123
Aug 31 2018 25 mins  
Recorded live at the FGS conference in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, it’s our annual Best Genealogy Websites episode. We’re discussing our 101 best sites list, interviewing Daniel Horowitz from MyHeritage, chatting with Rick Voight from Vivid-Pix and much more. Don’t miss this episode! Ep. 123: August 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History Online content direct Ashlee Peck joins us to discuss the building of the Berlin Wall and its impact on genealogy research. Two possible impacts to your research: Many families were separated by the wall, some of them for the full 28 years that the wall was in place. There are cases of expectant mothers and fathers being divided by the wall, leading to children not meeting their father until the wall fell. In some cases, it was too late and difficult for the children to develop relationships with their fathers at this point. In addition to children not being with their parents, many couples relationships did not survive the division, with many eventually moving on and finding a new partner or starting another family. The wall is that many people began to lie about what part of Berlin they were initially from, out of fear of being separated from family and friends. This can lead to misleading information in your research of records from the time period. Social Media Minute Why you should follow your DNA testing company on social media: Blog updates Most DNA testing companies post social updates sharing their newest blog articles. This is an excellent way to get thorough explanations of updates to DNA results as well as new additions to the websites. Along with their own blogs, they also often share great stories and case studies. Take advantage of groups and communities Many DNA testing companies take advantage of the community and group features of their social sites, offering followers a place to interact with each other and ask questions. Discover sales and genealogy record offers Companies will use their social media pages to promote their services and products, but this can give genealogists a way to stay on top of new record releases, special sales and discounts. Fold3, the military records site Ancestry runs, is particularly good about blogging when they are offer “Like” the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page Feature: Catching Up With Daniel Horowitz Daniel Horowitz, Head Genealogist at MyHeritage.com provides a run-down of the latest advances at the popular genealogy website: Updated records New Filtering System for DNA Matches New family reunions Daniel Horowitz is the genealogy expert at 

DNA and Adoption: Podcast Episode 122
Jul 24 2018 20 mins  
In this month’s podcast, we’re not only discussing DNA and adoption, but also premiering several new segments. Ep. 122: July 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: This Month in Family History This month we’re turning the clock back 45 years to a disastrous event that lit up the hot July skies in 1973: the fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis Missouri. Theresa Fitzgerald, Chief, Archival Operations at the National Archives at St. Louis tells us all about it. Resources: Read more about it in this recent article from our magazine Visit the National Archives website Social Media Minute “Like” the Family Tree Magazine Facebook page Website: Gedmatch Best Websites Randy Majors walks us through his website U.S. County Boundary Maps. Feature: 3 Tips from Sunny With the rise of DNA testing we’re seeing more and more articles published about adoptees locating and meeting their biological parents. Sunny Morton has written an article for the July / August issue of the magazine called One Man’s Successful Search for His Sperm Donor Father and she’s here to tell us about it. Sunny’s top 3 tips: * You’ll need advanced DNA strategies. You have to be willing to wait and to work the results* Remember that traditional genealogical research still plays a large role and you research the trees of matches.* Keep the human element in mind. Think about what you are looking for and your motivations for finding it. Keep expectations in check. Be sensitive to the perspective and lives of those you contact. DNA Deconstructed Many advances have made it possible for adoptees to search for answers using DNA more easily than they could even a few years ago. For instance * Types of at-home DNA tests have increased and dropped in price* Genealogical data and documents are accessible online in larger frequencies for adoptees to do preliminary research* Thank to social media. many people are easier to track down now* And, adoptees are sharing their DNA stories publicly, through TV shows and other media giving many people hope for their own search. Best Genealogy Websites: ISOGG Guest: Katherine Borges is the Co-Founder and Director of the International Society of Genetic Genealogy (ISOGG), which promotes and educates about genetic genealogy to over 20,000 members in over 70 countries. She works to increase professional standards in the practice, research, and discussion of relevant issues in DNA testing, interpretation, and ethics. Katherine gives many presentations on genetic genealogy to groups across the United States, the United Kingdom and in Ireland.

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Podcast: Episode 121
Jun 28 2018 45 mins  
The Family Tree Podcast is celebrating its 10 year anniversary! Join us as we discuss some of our favorite stories and interviews from the last decade. Ep. 121: June 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane discussed some of her favorite blog posts that she has shared over the last 10 years on the show. Top Tips Host Lisa Louise Cooke digs into the archive and shares two of her favorite interviews from the past. The first comes from Episode 83 which was published in April of 2015. The theme for the episode was source citation, and in the Family Tree University Crash Course segment Shannon Comb-Bennett, instructor of the Family Tree University: Source Citations for Regular People course made an eloquent case for citing your sources. The other favorite interview was first published in March of 2014. In the 101 Best Websites Lisa got to cover one of her favorite websites, Digital Public Library of America. Lisa interviewed Dan Cohen, Executive Director of the DPLA, and he took us on a tour of this terrific website. Social Media Minute with Rachel Fountain In this episode we introduce a brand new segment devoted to genealogy on social media. Rachel shares some of her favorite podcast that you may want to start listening to as well: * Family Ghosts* Hardcore History* Genealogy Gems* Genealogy Guys* More Perfect Follow Family Tree Magazine on social media: * Facebook* Twitter Family Tree University Crash Course Lisa wraps things up on this episode with instructor Lisa Alzo, instructor of the course Organize Your Genealogy Research. It’s always a good time to get organized, and the two Lisas have got some great ideas for you. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

The New Family Tree Magazine: Episode 120
May 24 2018 48 mins  
Need help deciding which DNA test is right for you? In this month’s podcast we’ll share tips for selecting your test. We’re also discussing Family Tree Magazine‘s new look. Join us! Ep. 120: May 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Introducing Family Tree Magazine‘s new look! Top Tips Top tips for selecting the right DNA kit with Shannon Combs-Bennett Shannon suggests: * Start with asking yourself “What do you want to find out?”* Think of DNA as another genealogical records* Go beyond Autosomal DNA. Consider Mitochondrial (your mother’s direct line) and YDNA (your father’s direct line) testing offered only by Family Tree DNA.* If you’re tight on money, keep an eye out for sales which are run regularly Look for Shannon’s 5 part series which will offer practical tips about each genetic genealogy testing service on the Family Tree Magazine website in the coming months. 101 Best Websites Lisa chats with David Fryxell, author of the 101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Family History, about Elephind.com, the historical newspaper archive search engine. Family Tree University Crash Course Gena Philibert-Ortega, instructor at Family Tree University, shares tips from her Become an Ancestry.com Power User class. Tips: 1. One important thing to remember about Ancestry is that it’s not just about searching on an ancestor’s name. Yes, we do that for the census, vital records, and other databases but there are collections that do not include names. Let me explain…Ancestry has collections like the Sears Catalog, postcards, and photos. The Sears Catalog is one of my favorites. This is a great database for understanding your ancestor’s life, identifying fraternal order jewelry in photos, or even learning more about the dishes and kitchen tools you inherited. 2. Use a Private Tree to work out problems. Ancestry.com family trees needn’t be public proclamations of your research. They can be a private tree where you work out if that Samuel Johnson is really your Samuel Johnson. Once you feel comfortable with your results you can make the tree public, download it to your genealogy software program, or you can delete it altogether. Class topics include: * The Online Family Tree* Searching Ancestry’s Online Records* Ancestry.com DNA* Using Ancestry.com to solve research problems This class is more than just searching Ancestry.com, it’s about taking your ancestry subscription and making the most of the tools that are offered. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison share background on Family Tree Magazine’s history, it’s mission, what’s changed, and where to find it! If you’d like to sign up for one of the memberships discussed in this segment, visit our subscription page. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke

All About Ancestry.com: Episode 119
Apr 26 2018 32 mins  
Ready to dive into Ancestry.com? Grab your headphones and join Lisa and her guests as they discuss top tips for maximizing the site. Ep. 119: April 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane introduces Family Tree Magazine’s new look! Top Tips Top tips for selecting the right DNA kit with Shannon Combs-Bennett: * Start with asking yourself “What do you want to find out?”* Think of DNA as another genealogical records* Go beyond Autosomal DNA. Consider Mitochondrial (your mother’s direct line) and YDNA (your father’s direct line) testing offered only by Family Tree DNA.* If you’re tight on money, keep an eye out for sales which are run regularly Look for Shannon’s 5 part series which will offer practical tips about each genetic genealogy testing service on the Family Tree Magazine website in the coming months. Best Websites Lisa chats with David Fryxell, author of the 101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Family History, about Elephind.com, the historical newspaper archive search engine. Family Tree University Crash Course Gena Philibert-Ortega, instructor at Family Tree University, shares tips from her Become an Ancestry.com Power User class. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison shares background on Family Tree Magazine’s history, it’s mission, what’s changed, and where to find it! Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!




Famous Family Trees: Episode 116
Jan 25 2018 39 mins  
Our January Podcast is all about famous family trees. Join Lisa as she discusses heraldry and the upcoming royal wedding. Ep. 116: January 2018 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad With the impending marriage of Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle, Diane looks at heraldry related to royal weddings. Top Tips Should you hang up your family coat of arms – or zip it up and show it off? We’ll untangle the myths of family heraldry and help you start discovering your armigerous ancestry. Best Websites In our 101 Best Websites for tracing your roots segment author David Fryxell is back to talk about a website where you can find many famous folks, and that’s Find A Grave. Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University Crash Course It’s January and chances are you are thinking about getting organized for the new year. Why not follow the strategies of the pros? Janine Adams visits the show to share some of the tips she’s gathered from well-known genealogy experts that she’ll be sharing in an upcoming workshop called What the Pros Know: Genealogy Organization Tips. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison shares her genealogy research resolutions for 2018. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!









Researching Your Heritage: Episode 108
May 18 2017 44 mins  
In this May 2017 podcast episode, host Lisa Louise Cooke brings in genealogy research experts Claire Santry and James Beidler to talk about researching ethnic heritage. Ep. 108: May 2017 Back to the episode list This month’s podcast is sponsored by DNA Bargains! In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad In this episode, Diane takes on a tour of heritage museums. Top Tips Claire Santry provides Irish genealogy tips from her book, The Family Tree Irish Genealogy Guide: How to Trace Your Ancestors in Ireland. Claire answers the question “Where’s the best place to start with Irish research?” and explains that there are two key factors to look for: * Religion* Place – townland 101 Best Websites Author and German genealogy expert James Beidler is back to talk about the German genealogy website called GEDBas. It features user-submitted family trees, but offers so much more. Family Tree University Crash Course Scotland’s colorful history and efforts to preserve their heritage is a boon to any family historian with Scottish ancestry. If you’re one of the many descendants of the 1.5 million Scots who immigrated to the Americas, you can learn how to find your ancestors before they ever left Scotland with the 4-week course, Scottish Genealogy Research Strategies. We will kick start your Scottish research with some search strategies from the Family Tree University Dean, Vanessa Weiland. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison shares about her family’s heritage and how it ties to her family today. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Genealogy Websites: Episode 106
Mar 15 2017 41 mins  
In this genealogy podcast episode, discover fabulous online resources for finding your family history and working with the ones you frequent. Ep. 106: March 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane talks about 9 Timesaving Hacks for Ancestry, FamilySearch and Other Top Genealogy Websites. Top Tips Are your genealogy finds too few and far between? Author David Fryxell covers tech tricks for freer, faster, more effective family history research from his new article called “Heritage Hacks.” 101 Best Websites One of the most popular websites with genealogists these days is Evernote.com, and Kerry Scott, author of the book How to Use Evernote for Genealogy, joins Lisa on the podcast to talk about some of her favorite genealogical uses for this versatile program. Favorite uses: * Indexing and OCR* DNA and sharing* Presentations* Store publications and make them searchable Family Tree University Spotlight FamilySearch.org is a genealogy website from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day is among the top online resources for family historians, with more than 3.5 billion names in searchable databases and 1.2 billion names in family trees. And the best part? It’s free! Family Tree University instructor, Lisa Alzo, shares tips from the family tree university independent study course called Become a FamilySearch Power User. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison shares some of her favorite lesser known genealogy websites: * Archaic Medical Terms* GenDisasters* Epodunk Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Plan for Genealogy Success in 2017: Episode 104
Jan 18 2017 34 mins  
Kick off the year with these tips to formulate your plan for successful genealogy research. Ep. 104: January 2017 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad talks about how to revive lost memories in your own histories. Top Tips: Ancestry.com Ancestry is one of the mainstays of online genealogy research, and that means that one of the keys to success in 2017 will be to say up to date on the best way to use the site. Nancy Hendrickson, the author of the brand new Unofficial Ancestry.com Workbook: A How-to Manual for Tracing Your Family Tree on the #1 Genealogy Website joins Lisa to talk about one of the features you should master this year: hinting. Nancy’s Tips: * Don’t use the website, use the mobile app – filter “show me hints on all the Jones”, and “stories”.* Work on one surname or person at a time.* Ancestry casts a wide net – Quickly skim down and look for stuff that doesn’t apply, clear them out. Best Websites: HeritageQuest David Fryxell, author of the 101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Roots, helps set you up for success with HeritageQuest, a long-time favorite genealogy website that may be available through your local library. Family Tree University Crash Course Blaine Bettinger is the instructor of our Genetic Genealogy 101 course and author of the book The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy. In this episode, he shares tips for choosing the right DNA test. TIP: Test oldest generation first * Y-DNA Test: paternal line (males only) Available through Family Tree DNA* mtDNA Test: mother’s line (less informative for genealogy) Available through Family Tree DNA* Autsomal Test: males and females can take this test. Available through AncestryDNA, 23andMe Family Tree DNA, and MyHeritage.   The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Lisa and Allison discuss the new and improved State Research Guides. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

State-Based Ancestry: Episode 103
Dec 15 2016 33 mins  
In this December podcast, we explore state-based genealogy research and the available tools and techniques for discovering our U.S. ancestors. Ep. 103: December 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gets us up to speed on the latest news from the blogosphere. Read her blog post here: Are You Missing the Best Genealogy Websites for Finding U.S. Ancestors? 101 Best Websites Topic: Cool geography websites for US research, with Dave Fryxell * Atlas of Historical County Boundaries* Atlas of the Historical Geography of the U.S.* Bureau of Land Management: General Land Office Records* US Geological Survey Family Tree University Crash Course Tips for US research from recent webinars, with Vanessa Wieland. Know Your State History: Fun fact: A lot of us tend to think that American settlements start in the East, with Jamestown and the 13 Colonies, but before that, in 1598, the Spanish were lead into New Mexico. While there might not be a lot of genealogy-based documentation for that particular event, it does impact the heritage of people in the Southwest. It’s always good to learn the history of each state to get a sense of what events could have an impact, especially when those events might generate records and attract immigration. Study the State’s Geography: Think about the geographical layout of your state and why that would attract people.  * Big cities tend to bring a large population, but if your ancestors were farmers or coal miners, or worked on the railroad, that would impact which states – and where in that state – they would have settled. * Think about how geography affects – or encourages travel and migration – River routes, railroads, etc. – opportunities arising out of that * Think about how your ancestor’s ethnicity might affect where they chose to settle.  * Check the records of surrounding/nearby states as well Learn About the Records: Because each state has its own unique history and and laws, there are going to be unique challenges and collections of records generated.  * When you’re tracing your ancestors in a specific state, it pays to do some research beforehand into the collections available – learn the start dates for specific types of records* Did they conduct a state census?

Stepping Into Your Ancestor’s Shoes: Episode 102
Nov 16 2016 37 mins  
Gain invaluable insight into the lives of your ancestors by learning how to use social history to reconstruct their neighborhoods, find new records, and more. Ep. 102: November 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad In this episode, Diane talks about how you can step into your ancestor’s shoes to learn how they really lived, as well as how that can offer clues to finding additional records. Top Tips One of the best ways to step into your ancestor’s shoes is to stroll through their neighborhood. In her new article, Here Comes the Neighborhood, contributing editor Sunny Morton shows us how we can use old records, maps, and photos to recreate the place our family called home and open a window into their lives. Check out the article in the Oct/Nov 2016 Family Tree Magazine issue. Family Tree University Crash Course In her half-hour video class called Using the American Memory Collection, Shannon Combs-Bennett shows you how to sift through the Library of Congress’ American Memory Collection website, and discover a vast array of digitized photographs, filmstrips, newspapers, music, and more to augment your US genealogy research. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest news from the publisher’s desk. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Cemeteries and Genealogy: Episode 101
Oct 19 2016 39 mins  
Learn all about what cemetery records you can find and how they can benefit your genealogy research in this month’s podcast. Ep. 101: October 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane talks about going to the cemetery and the things you can learn about your ancestors from their cemetery records. Top Tips: Key Clues in Cemetery Research In this segment, we talk key clues in cemetery records from the Cemetery Records Workbook in the Oct/Nov 2016 Family Tree Magazine issue by Sharon DeBartolo Carmack. Sharon talks about: * What we should be looking for when it comes to cemeteries and their records* Which sites to turn to first* Strategies to try if you don’t have luck finding your ancestor’s burial place Best Websites: FamilySearch Jennifer Davis from the Records Division at Family Search gives us the scoop on cemetery and death records at Family Search. She provides an overview of the types of death and burial records we can find in their online database and advice on how to effectively run a search to find them. Finally, she explains Family Search’s partnership with memorial websites such as Find A Grave and Billion Graves, and how to work with their content on the Family Search site. Family Tree University Crash Course Vanessa Wieland shares tips from Family Tree University’s 2-week self-paced course: Doing Cemetery Research. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison’s Cemetery Research Dos and Don’ts: * Do check for online databases of cemetery records. See if the cemetery has posted burial records online.* Don’t assume that the tombstone is all there is. The cemetery might have additional burial records it will allow you to access, and those records could contain information and clues that complement the tombstones.* Do find out the cemetery’s hours, rules, etc. before visiting in person. It would be a shame to show up and not be able to do what you came for.* Don’t apply any substances other than water to a tombstone to make it more readable. When I got started, I heard a lot people recommend using shaving cream to bring out the words, but preservationists do not recommend this. Instead take a digital photo and then use the photo editing software to adjust the contrast so you can make out the transcription. If the lighting isn’t good for the photograph, try using a mirror to reflect sunlight onto the stone.* Do take photos of the entire plot and any surrounding stones you think could have a connection to your family, to create a permanent record. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos.

Our 100th Podcast Episode!
Sep 15 2016 54 mins  
Family Tree Magazine is celebrating our 100th episode with this special, hour-long podcast. From unusual surnames to special censuses, get the great genealogy search tips and tools, we revisit five highlights from the past few years. Ep. 100: September 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: Celebrating a Milestone We celebrate a milestone: Our 100th episode! In this hour long podcast, our host, Lisa Louise Cooke, looks back at some of her most memorable highlights of the last 99 episodes: * Special Census with Curt Witcher* Local Flavor with Sunny Morton* The Library of Congress with James Sweany* Finding Your Roots with CeCe Moore* Unusual Surnames with David Fryxell Top Tips: Special Census with Curt Witcher The US census is more than those every-10-years head counts; several types of “special censuses” may also hold ancestor answers. In our Top Tips segment, Curt Witcher, department manager for the Historical Genealogy Department of the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, IN talks about the content of these records and where to use them. Read our complete guide to nine types of special censuses in the July 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Local Flavor with Sunny Morton One of the best ways to spice up your family history is by adding a dash of local flavor. Background details of your ancestors’ everyday lives like the fashion of the day, the foods they ate and local scandals rocking their neighborhood can all help you understand where they were coming from, and can also sweeten up your storytelling. In this episode, Sunny Jane Morton, author of the article “Local Flavor” from the Sept. 2013 issue of the magazine, shares some of the homegrown ingredients that will help you cook up fresh genealogical discoveries. The Library of Congress with James Sweany James Sweany, Head of Local History and Genealogy Reference Services at the Library of Congress takes you on a tour of the website. Finding Your Roots with CeCe Moore Special guest CeCe Moore discusses what it’s like to research for the PBS show Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr.CeCe is the co-founder of the Institute for Genetic Genealogy, an instructor for a number of courses and confer...


Organizing Your Research: Episode 98
Jul 15 2016 38 mins  
The secret to great genealogy: Learn how to organize your family history research! This episode is all about organization tips, tools and techniques. Ep. 98: July 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Read Diane’s blog posts on the Genealogy Insider blog: Working on My Last-Name Problem: When Genealogy Records Disagree and Organized Genealogy Research: Matching Up Two Theresas. Top Tips: Organized Genealogy Andrew Koch, the editor of the book How to Use Evernote for Genealogy shares five things you can do with Evernote: * Keep a research log—p. 134* Keep track of previous searches and where you looked—prevents doing duplicate research* Especially helpful for when doing research over long periods of time* Can provide more detail than a family tree can* Can serve as the basis for a research/ancestor report* Save important links—p. 106–107* Provides easy web access to online record collections or research resources. Could also have note for shopping list or for schedule of webinars or online courses* Evernote Web Clipper browser add-on allows you to easily save important screenshots, records, and web links* Plan future projects/create to-do lists—p. 13, 48* Take notes about future goals, then circle back* Can create to-do lists with check boxes to help keep you on task* Evernote has Reminder system that will keep you on-task* Also allows for collaboration on projects—you can send individual notes or notebooks to others either by URL or by sharing the actual note and making it collaborative* Share your research—pp. 112–122* Allows you to share notes and notebooks via e-mail and social media (Facebook, Twitter)* Allows for collaboration opportunities—you can send notes and notebooks to others either by URL or by sharing the actual note and making it collaborative* For Premium subscribers, you can also do presentation mode, which converts your selected notes into a slideshow-like presentation similar to Microsoft Powerpoint* Create research templates for recording data (e.g. census abstract forms) pp. 136–137* Create table to input data and have it accessible across multiple devices* Copy and paste templates for different kinds of notes* Book has template for each federal census Family Tree University Crash Course Excel spreadsheets have been keeping folks in organized in all types of work. Why not genealogy? We certainly deal with our fair share of data. Shannon Combs-Bennett is back to share tips from her webinar video called Spreadsheet Secrets to Organize Your Genealogy. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison talks about the power of using genealogy forms to stay organized and achieve your research goals.  Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s

Maximizing Military Records: Episode 97
Jun 16 2016 42 mins  
Follow along with Family Tree University and host Lisa Louise Cooke as we cover the essentials of researching your ancestors’ military service. Ep. 97: June 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane’s talks about 12 free websites to search for your fallen military ancestors. Top Tips: Preserve Military Memorabilia In our Top Tips segment the Family Curator, Denise Levenick, returns to the show to talk about how to preserve military memorabilia such as flags, medals and uniforms. 101 Best Websites David Fryxell shares a sneak peek at the military sites included in the upcoming 2016 list: * American Battle Monuments Commission – www.abmc.gov* Civil War Soliders & Sailors System – www.itd.nps.gov/cwss* Daughters of the American Revolution – www.dar.org* Fold3 – www.fold3.com* National Archives and Records Administration – www.archives.gov* Nationwide Gravesite Locator – gravelocator.cem.va.gov* Family Relatives.com – www.familyrelatives.com Family Tree University Crash Course Nancy Hendrickson returns to give us a crash course on military records based on her on-demand video webinar How to Find Ancestor Military Records. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Lisa and Allison talk about the latest resources to trace your military ancestors from Family Tree Magazine. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Tracing Hard-to-Find Ancestors: Episode 96
May 16 2016 37 mins  
Get genealogy tips for researching those hard-to-find ancestors: using newspaper archives, finding missing people in the census and more. Ep. 96: May 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane discusses the “in person” factor that occurs at conferences and can boost your research. Top Tips: Hiding in the Census In the Top Tips segment Lisa invites David Fryxell back to the show to provide tips on how to find ancestors that seem to be hiding in the census, from his article “Hiding in the Census” which appears in the May / June 2016 issue. Best Websites: Newspapers.com Newspapers can offer genealogical information sometimes found nowhere else. Author and genealogist James Beidler discusses searching digitized newspapers at Newspapers.com. Family Tree University Crash Course Genealogy research isn’t just about finding records of your ancestor’s existence or building a pretty family tree. Family Tree University Dean Vanessa Wieland discusses what we can learn from the records we find, and how can we use that information to understand our past. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison’s top three tips for outwitting elusive ancestors: * Researching the elusive ancestors sideways – siblings, cousins, coworkers, neighbors, etc.* Making a timeline. Allison likes using Excel to create timelines that can expose gaps in her research.* Putting the problem aside and taking a break! Come back with fresh eyes. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Tracing Immigrant Ancestors: Episode 95
Apr 14 2016 44 mins  
In this episode, get the scoop on tracing your immigrant ancestors, from tips on finding German and Eastern European ancestors, to tracing your Irish roots. Ep. 95: April 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad In this month’s episode, Diane Haddad follows up on her blog post on “The Four Ways I’ve Found German Ancestors’ Birthplaces.” Top Tips: Eastern European Research Let’s trace our Eastern European immigrants, and we’ll do that with Lisa Alzo, author of the new Family Tree Polish, Czech, and Slovak Genealogy Guide. Lisa discusses how to get started in Eastern European research, heritage travel, and resources for facing challenges with names, geography and language.  Best Websites: German Resources This month’s featured websites are all about the German resources on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org with Jim Beidler, author of the new book, Trace Your German Ancestors Online. * Meyers gazetteer – geographic dictionary or village names: Link on Ancestry* Germany Gazetteers on the FamilySearch Wiki  Family Tree University Crash Course Lisa discusses researching Irish Immigrant ancestors with Donna Moughty, presenter of the on-demand video webinar, Tracing Your Irish Immigrant Ancestors. Visit Donna at her website to learn more about her heritage trips! The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest news from the publisher’s desk. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Online Genealogy Tools and Apps: Episode 94
Mar 15 2016 45 mins  
Learn about some great online tools, apps and resources you can use in your genealogy research. Ep. 94: March 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane covers the demise and return of Family Tree Maker, plus Ancestry.com’s partnership with RootsMagic. Top Tips: Triple Threat There are three big players in online genealogy records: Ancestry, FindMyPast, and MyHeritage. Just how do they measure up to each other – and to your research needs? In today’s Top Tips segment, Lisa Louise Cooke invites Family Tree Magazine Contributing Editor Sunny Morton back to the show to share what she learned when she dug into all three of them for her article that appears in the March/April 2016 issue of the magazine. 101 Best Websites In our 101 best websites segment we’re going to take another look at Ancestry, and you might be surprised to hear that Ancestry features many database collections that don’t require a paid membership. Lisa chats with author Dana McCullough about exactly where to look. he has divided these free collections into about 4 main categories: * US Genealogy: 1940 census* Regional City and State: PA: Philadelphia Bank Immigrant Passage Records, 1890-1949* Military: Index of Revolutionary War Pensioners at americanancestor.org, and full records available at Fold3.com* Ethnic records: Brandenburg, Prussia Emigration Records Family Tree University Crash Course So you’ve been assembling some great stuff on your family history and you want to share it with relatives near and far. One of the best ways to do that is with a website. In today’s FTU Crash Course, Lisa Alzo shares tips on How to Make a Family Website. In addition to being a great vehicle for sharing family history with our relatives, a website also gives us our own online bulletin board of sorts, that can help us connect with cousins who are Googling the same ancestors. So just about anyone can benefit from having a website. Thinking about creating your own family history website? Here’s where Lisa recommends you start: * Importance of having an idea of what you want in a family website before you choose a platform, including evaluating a free site or a top level domain.* Run a small trial site before investing a lot of time and effort, to get to know the features, etc.* A few tips on what to include on your family website (photos, stories, family trees, history, etc.) The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison shares 3 must-see sessions from the Winter Virtual Conference. These sessions teach you how to maximize technology in your genealogy work. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


The Best Methods for Searching Your Family Last Names: Episode 93
Feb 17 2016 43 mins  
Get the best genealogy research tips and tools for searching your family’s last names – from how to handle common surnames to using of geographical data. Ep. 93: February 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane talks about her latest blog post on the Genealogy Insider blog: Surname Genealogy Strategies: My Favorite (And Least Favorite) Last Names to Research. Top Tips with David Fryxell David Fryxell is back to explain how an unusual surname can be an asset when researching your family history. And he’s got 6 strategies for using those oddball names to your advantage from his article, “The Unusual Suspects,” available in the Jan/Feb issue of Family Tree Magazine. 101 Best Websites Anna Fechter of Ancestry.com takes us on a tour of the Rootsweb Surname List website. Family Tree University Spotlight A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but for the family historian, names are vital to our research – and often just as thorny! Nancy Hendrickson returns to the Family Tree University Crash Course segment to share some tips on the best methods to research your family’s trickiest last names. Nancy’s tips for distinguishing between people with a common name: * Go to Google first* Use search operators such as quotation marks to denote exact phrase that must be in all search results* Add the word Genealogy to increase the chances that the website containing other keywords will be genealogy/family history focused* Search for your surname* Things named with that name Favorite Tools: * Surname distribution maps – Learn more about them from the FamilySearch Wiki* US Board of Geographic Names (click Search Domestic Names) Resources: * Surname Genealogy Research Strategies OnDemand webinar, with Nancy Hendrickson* Google Earth for Genealogy (Video Tutorial CDs)* The Genealogist’s Google Toolbox (book)* Download Google Earth Pro for free The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison talks about how she uses spreadsheets to keep her genealogical research on course. Allison’s favorite resources for surname origins: * Dictionary of American Family Names from Oxford University Press, searchable on Ancestry.

Set Yourself up for Genealogy Success in 2016: Episode 92
Jan 19 2016 39 mins  
Set yourself up to make your genealogy research efforts successful in 2016, with ideas for organizing, researching and more! Ep. 92: January 2016 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us the scoop on the “Finding Your Roots” season premiere. Top Tips: Make No Mistake Making sure that you are researching the correct person as your ancestor is certainly a key to success, so in an extended Top Tips segment professional genealogist Shelley Bishop will join me and she’ll cover seven time-tested strategies to confirm that you have indeed added the right people to your family tree. Top Tips:  * Resist the urge to merge* Venture beyond the index* Create a chart or timeline* Map it out* Follow the network* Beware making assumptions* Play Devils’ Advocate Family Tree University Spotlight: Source Citations for Genealogists One area that is absolutely critical to the success of every genealogist is source citation. Shannon Combs-Bennett returns to the show to share some pointers for easier, more effective documentation from her Family Tree University class, Source Citations for Genealogists. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan If the thought of a spreadsheet makes you cringe, you’ll be in for a pleasant surprise, because when it comes to genealogy, a spreadsheet can be the best record you’ll ever keep – and even lead you to making new connections you’ve never seen before! Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Brick Wall Busting Strategies: Episode 90
Nov 16 2015 45 mins  
In this month’s episode, learn how to break down those brick walls in your family tree with fantastic tips and tools from Lisa Louise Cooke and her guests. Ep. 90: November 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Editor Diane Haddad provides a buffet of brick wall strategies from some of her recent Genealogy Insider blog articles. * The 1939 register from FindMyPast can help you with brick walls caused by modern record gaps due to privacy restrictions, or in this case, the absence of a census in England.* Newspapers can be helpful in opening up new research avenues and filling in details.* Under-recorded populations such as American Indians can be difficult to research. This post explains six clues to prompt your research into American Indian ancestry. Top Tips: 10 Ways to Tell if You’ve Really Hit a Brick Wall If you feel like you’ve hit a brick wall in your genealogy research, it may actually just be a detour—not the end of your research road. In his article Long Way Around (Dec. 2015 issue) author David Fryxell discusses 10 ways to tell if we are really at the end of the records road, or just at a detour. 101 Best Websites for Genealogy Lisa’s guest Taneya Koonce shares her favorite websites: * Afro-Louisiana History and Genealogy 1719-1820* Digital Library on American Slavery* Taneya’s Genealogy Blog Family Tree University: Cluster and Collateral Research Contributing Editor Sunny Morton joins Lisa to share tips from Family Tree University’s course, Cluster and Collateral Research 101. Cluster and Collateral Research 101 covers: * How to get started with cluster and collateral research: who to look for, what constitutes a cluster or collateral relation* When to use cluster and collateral approaches* Which records are best for cluster and collateral research, including census, vital, church, newspapers, land transfers, wills. etc.* How to determine the names and relationships between relatives* How to organize and employ the information you extract from cluster and collateral research* How to find clusters beyond neighbors and coworkers that hold info about your ancestor * Research problems needed to extend the tree* Explain a mystery or apparent contradiction in the record* Identify how someone fits into the family* Separate people of the same name* Find a family that disappears* Research before 1850 and immig...


Organizing Your Genealogy: Episode 88
Sep 18 2015 54 mins  
This episode is all about getting organized so you can quickly store and secure your genealogical findings and build your genealogy portfolio. Ep. 88: September 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares her top organization tips from one of her latest Genealogy Insider blog posts. 101 Best Websites for Genealogy: Evernote Lisa discusses Evernote and how you can use it for your genealogy research. Evernote is a free website, a software application, and mobile app. You can use it on all platforms: PC, Mac, iOS, Android, Windows. It synchronizes your research notes via the Internet so that you always have the most current updates of your notes on all your computing devices. Lisa recommends using notebooks sparingly, and focusing on tags. Here are some ideas for tags: * Record types (census, birth, death, marriage, etc.)* Locations (city, state, country)* Surnames (Smith, Jones, etc.)* Tasks (Analyze, Correspondence, Questions, etc) Family Tree University Spotlight Instructor Lisa Alzo helps you get organized with tips from her Family Tree University course Organize Your Genealogy. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison dishes up some of her personal organizational strategies. Here are Allison’s favorite organizational tools:  * Google Drive: https://www.google.com/drive/* Microsoft Outlook: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-com/* Set up bookmarks on your browser* Evernote: http://www.evernote.com  Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!




Rooting Out Research Mistakes: Episode 85
Jun 16 2015 45 mins  
This month’s theme is Rooting Out Research Mistakes. Lisa interviews contributing editors for tips on how to keep your genealogy clean of errors. Ep. 85: June 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Editor-in-Chief Diane Haddad shares her recent blog post called “Confessing a Genealogy Mistake.” Top Tips: Myth-Takes Would it surprise you to know that many of those often-repeated assumptions about the past are simply not true? The problem is that “myth-takes” like these about days gone by can affect the way you pursue your family history, ultimately becoming roadblocks to finding your ancestors and understanding their lives. To help us prevent this from happening, Diane Haddad sheds some light on common genealogy myths found in the new article by Nick D’Alto called “Genealogy Mythbusters,” which appears in the July/August 2015 issue of Family Tree Magazine. 101 Best Websites: Correcting Misinformation on Ancestry.com When inaccurate information is posted on an Ancestry Family Tree or a transcription of a genealogical record, it has the potential of tainting the research of future genealogists. In this episode, Nancy Hendrickson, author of The Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com walks you through how to submit corrections to Ancestry.com to help prevent this from happening. Family Tree University: Treat Errors in Your Research Contributing Editor Sunny Morton walks us through her process for not-quite starting over, as excerpted from her video class 12 Ways to Diagnose (and Treat) Errors in Your Research: “First, review and rethink what you’ve already learned—go back to those original sources to see what you’ve missed.” Sunny shares four strategies for tracking down original records and searching deeper for additional records about a single event. She then describes how to organize and regroup what you’ve found with tools like timelines and maps, and renew your search with fresh eyes, energy and questions. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan In this episode, Publisher Allison Dolan shares ideas for resolving conflicting data and analyzing evidence from the book The Family Tree Problem Solver. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Archiving Family Photos: Episode 84
May 18 2015 42 mins  
This month we have tips on photo organizing secrets, 25 keepsake family photo projects and Lisa provides strategies for navigating the Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog. Ep. 84: May 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane discusses 25 keepsake family photo projects.  Top Tips: Digital Photo Organizing Secrets Digital photo organizing secrets from Denise May Levenick, author of the book How to Archive Family Photos. 101 Best Websites: Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online Catalog Lisa recommends reviewing the Help page to familiarize yourself with best practices for using the site and images. Click the orange Subscribe button above the search box to subscribe for free to the Picture This Blog featuring Highlights from the collections, research tips, upcoming public programs, as well as peeks “behind the scenes” in the Prints & Photographs Division. Family Tree University: Photo Editing & Retouching for Genealogists Digital photography tools are essential for genealogists–not only for capturing family memories now, but also for preserving, retouching and editing historical photos. From scanning and uploading these pictures to your computer, to fixing damaged areas and reprinting, there is an hour-long webinar video from expert Nancy Hendrickson at Family Tree Shop that will revive and reinvigorate your family photo collection. Family Tree University Dean Tyler Moss shares tips from the video. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Publisher Allison Dolan shares a few fun ideas for ways to celebrate National Photo Month. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Mapping Mania: Episode 82
Mar 16 2015 38 mins  
Lisa interviews guests about mapping strategies and websites to find and use old maps like HistoryGeo, David Rumsey and Google Earth, and more. Ep. 82: March 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Read Diane’s tips for using the David Rumsey Historical Maps website. Top Tips: Mapping Strategies Publisher Allison Dolan joins Lisa to discuss the curation process of the new book Family Tree Historical Maps Book: Europe, and some of the mapping strategies she learned from that experience. 101 Best Websites: HistoryGeo.com Greg Boyd, the found of HistoryGeo takes us on a tour of the website. HistoryGeo.com is a family history software service for linking old maps and land records to your genealogy research. They are best known for providing online versions of the Family Maps and Texas Land Survey Maps book series, and now have released the First Landowners Project. Family Tree University: Google Earth for Genealogists Tyler turns the tables and interviews Lisa about using the free Google Earth program for family history. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison’s five favorite online map resources * Google Maps* Maplandia* Sanborn maps (look for subscription databases like ProQuest available through your public library.) Also: Sanborn Fire Maps at the Library of Congress.* Library of Congress* David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


The Past & Future of Genealogy: Episode 80
Jan 16 2015 43 mins  
In the 15th Anniversary episode of the podcast, host Lisa Louise Cooke asks the editors and writers of Family Tree Magazine to reminisce about the past decade and a half in genealogy, and to speculate on the future of family history. Ep. 80: January 2015 Back to the episode list In this episode: Family Tree Magazine Flashback Publisher Allison Dolan and Managing Editor Diane Haddad look back over the last 15 years of the magazine. Top Tips: Fab 15 Diane shares some must-use tools for your genealogy research, from the article Power Tools: Technological Changes to Genealogy Research by Rick Crume, which appears in the Jan/Feb 2015 anniversary issue of the magazine. The resources they cover include: online census records, crowdsourced databases, online mapping and more. 15 Fabulous Family Tree Tools Join us to celebrate Family Tree Magazine’s 15th Anniversary by entering our sweepstakes for 15 Fabulous Family Tree Tools—a $500 value! Family History Flash Forward Lisa asks five of the top Family Tree Magazine contributors to peer into the future 15 years from now to predict what resources or advancements they think will have changed genealogy. Featuring David Fryxell, Maureen Taylor, Denise Levenick, Lisa Alzo, and Sunny Morton. And throughout this episode we will be hearing from you, our loyal Family Tree Magazine readers! Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

2014 Genealogy Year in Review: Episode 79
Dec 16 2014 32 mins  
We’ll discuss major genealogy news to happen in 2014, the best family history websites of 2014, and tips from the best webinars to take place this year. Ep. 79: December 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane and Lisa review the top genealogy stories of 2014. 101 Best Websites: Genealogy News Allison gives her favorite sites for keeping up on genealogy news: * Ancestry Insider* DearMYRTLE* Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems Blog* Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter* Rootsweb* Get the entire list here! Family Tree University: Best Webinars of 2014 Tyler’s Top 4 Webinars and Tips Using DNA to Solve Family Mysteries by Blaine Bettinger Sometimes it’s just as important to consider what DNA can’t do for your genealogy, as it is to know what it can do. What DNA can do: * Examine deep ancestry (1,000’s of years ago)* Examine recent ancestry (within past 500-700 years)* Identify unknown genetic relatives* Test genealogical hypotheses & answer family mysteries* Reveal family secrets! What DNA can’t do: * Tests will NOT return a family tree* Testing alone cannot always determine relatedness* DNA alone rarely solves mysteries – combine DNA and traditional research Making Evernote Effortless by Lisa Louise Cooke Evernote is an excellent tool for source citations. For instance, you can take a screenshot of citation details on Ancestry.com, and then include a URL back to the webpage. Photo Editing and Retouching for Genealogists by Nancy Hendrickson Scan your old photos in color, even if the image is black and white. Even a black and white image can have subtle variations in shades of gray. By scanning in color, you are able to better draw out that contrast. Cloud Genealogy Crash Course with Randy Whited There is so much more to the cloud than just online storage. Of course, backup is a major component, but the uses far surpass the obvious. Randy talks about Google Drive and Evernote, of course, which allow you to access your genealogy notes from any computer with an internet connection. He also discusses apps to pull information off of the internet and save it to review later, such as Pocket, Feedly and the Evernote Web-Clipper. He even goes into photo sharing—saving your old photos to the cloud—and collaborative online family trees. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan We want to hear how Family Tree Magazine has helped you in the past decade and a half—and feature some of you on the show.

DNA & Your Genealogy: Episode 78
Nov 14 2014 45 mins  
Special guest CeCe Moore discusses what it’s like to research for the PBS show “Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr.” Ep. 78: November 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares some tips and resources for incorporating DNA testing into your genealogy research. Top Tips: Finding Your Roots Special guest CeCe Moore discusses what it’s like to research for the PBS show “Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates Jr.” CeCe is the co-founder of the Institute for Genetic Genealogy, an instructor for a number of courses and conferences around the U.S. and the author of the blog Your Genetic Genealogist and Adoption and DNA. 101 Best Websites: Family Tree DNA We will take a closer look at one of the leading DNA websites, Family Tree DNA, with its founder, Bennett Greenspan. Bennett is the president and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and also the managing partner of Family Tree DNA’s parent company, Gene by Gene. He’s also the project administrator of several surname DNA projects, and a genetic genealogy lecturer. Family Tree University: Genetic Genealogy 101 Blaine Bettinger, author of The Genetic Genealogist blog and instructor of the Family Tree University course Genetic Genealogy 101, discusses common misconceptions about using DNA for genealogy and how DNA can help you bust through your brick walls. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison discusses the evolution of DNA testing for genealogists. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Haunting Ancestral Cemeteries: Episode 77
Oct 20 2014 43 mins  
This month we’re haunting ancestral cemeteries! Analyze ancestral tombstones, find obituaries online and learn how to make a cemetery research trip. Ep. 77: October 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane discusses FamilySearch/GenealogyBank obituaries partnership. Top Tips: Cemetery Research Dos and Don’ts Lisa chats with Allison cemetery research dos and don’ts. Allison’s Recommendations: •    Go online to see what’s already available and then plan your visit•    Pack for your outdoor activity! Camera, Sunscreen, Umbrella, Layered clothes, Map of the Cemetery, note taking tools, mirror, water, bug spray•    Ask in the Cemetery office for a map•    Be respectful and observe cemetery rules Download the Cemetery Transcription Form. Don’t: •    Go alone. Bring a helper with you.•    Be careless around unstable and fragile stones•    Put shaving cream on a tombstone. Water is OK. 101 Best Websites: BillionGraves About our guest Hudson Gunn, President of BillionGraves: Hudson graduated from Utah Valley University with a BS in Business Management and Entrepreneurship. Over the last several years, he has created several technology geared toward connecting families and making genealogy easier to a larger audience through mobile technology. He has been awarded Student Entrepreneur of the Year and Best Small Business. As President of BillionGraves, he utilizes this leading technology to preserve the world’s headstones one picture at a time. Family Tree University: Analyzing Ancestral Tombstones Genealogy author and instructor Diana Crisman Smith explains how to find clues in the tombstones of your ancestors in the video class Analyzing Ancestral Tombstones. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Publisher Allison Dolan tells you how to get the perfect tombstone rubbing. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Your Genealogy Preparedness Plan: Episode 76
Sep 16 2014 44 mins  
This month is all about Genealogy Preparedness. Learn how to backup your research, archive physical files and ensure long-term preservation of your genealogy. Ep. 76: September 2014 Back to the episode list This episode is sponsored by BackBlaze. In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane discusses four pointers to preserve your family heirlooms in a disaster. Top Tips: Your Genealogy Disaster Plan Denise May Levenick’s disaster preparation and salvage tips, from the September 2014 issue of Family Tree Magazine, can be found in her article “Your Genealogy Disaster Plan.” 1: Before Disaster Strikes, Learn Your Risks * Gather important numbers* Practice prevention* Prioritize keepsakes* Digitize to safeguard* Get an insurance checkup* Back up computer files* Save passwords* Practice smart storage* Make a genealogy grab and go list* Create a genealogy disaster kit 2: After a Disaster * Assess the damage* Collect scattered items* Contact your insurance agent* Box on salvaging wet photos Visit Denise’s Website: http://www.thefamilycurator.com/ 101 Best Websites: Develop Your Digital Archive Allison Dolan, publisher of Family Tree Magazine shares some of the sites and tools from the 101 Best Websites list that factor into your genealogy “preparedness plan.” • Flickr: Share/store digital copies of photos. You can set up an account that other members of your family can access/add to so that there are multiple copies of everyone’s favorite pictures.• Evernote: Create and keep copies of your notes in the cloud.• BackupMyTree: Automatically backup your genealogy software files.• Ancestry.com, FamilySearch, MyHeritage, TribalPages: Hosting an online tree is a way to ensure your data isn’t entirely lost in a computer failure or natural disaster. Choose a service that allows the level of privacy you’re comfortable with. Family Tree University: Genealogy Estate Planning When you pass on to the great beyond, who will inherit your hordes of hard-found genealogy research? In this segment, Online Editor Tyler Moss discusses how you can plan the prolonged preservation of your genealogy research, long after you’re gone. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan

Best Genealogy Websites of 2014: Episode 75
Aug 13 2014 41 mins  
Listen for highlights from our 15th annual listing of the 101 Best Genealogy Websites. Ep. 75: August 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Lisa and Diane break down some favorite selections from this year’s 101 best websites, including: * Pension records on Ancestry.com* Historic Newspapers on Newspapers.com* Free historic newspapers at Chronicling America  Top Tips & 101 Best Websites: Ancestry.com This September, Family Tree Magazine released our 15th annual listing of the 101 Best Genealogy Websites list. The collection is curated by Family Tree Magazine founding editor David A. Fryxell. This list can guide your research and give you new reasons to visit your old favorites. Family Tree University: Fall 2014 Virtual Conference Coming in September is the Fall 2014 Virtual Genealogy Conference. You will learn strategies and resources to boost your research—and because it’s web-based, you can participate from anywhere! This conference features 15 half-hour videos about genealogy technology, research strategies, and ethnic research. You can also participate in live chats and message board discussions. In this month’s section, Online Editor Tyler Moss discusses one of his favorite live chats from the last virtual conference on Female Ancestors and the Law. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Family Tree Magazine Publisher Allison Dolan gives her best research strategies. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Tracing Your Military Ancestors: Episode 73
Jun 12 2014 36 mins  
This month’s theme is Tracing Military Ancestors. Learn how to find info on your female veteran ancestors, what military records you can find and much more. Ep. 73: June 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares some interesting news on where to find military records. Top Tips: Tracing Female Veterans Even though our theme for this episode is Tracing Your Military Ancestors, that doesn’t limit our conversation to men. Women have historically played vital roles both on the home front and on the field. This was certainly true during World War I. Lisa Alzo joins Lisa to discuss our female ancestors who served. 101 Best Websites: Fold3.com Learn more about how to get the most out of the leading military records website Fold3 with Anne Gillespie Mitchell, Senior Product Manager at Ancestry.com. Family Tree University: US Military Records With so many military conflicts throughout America’s history, it’s likely your ancestors were involved. Finding records of their service will help you round out the portraits of their lives and honor their memory. Military files also can reveal information about widows and children—and even ancestors who didn’t serve might have left behind draft records. Online Editor Tyler Moss shares tips from the upcoming Family Tree University course “US Military Records: Trace Your Ancestors’ Service” which runs 7/7/2014 – 8/1/2014. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan •    Interview a veteran through StoryCorps•    Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project•    Nominate a WWII veteran for an Honor Flight Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Genealogy Road Trips and Tours: Episode 72
May 15 2014 45 mins  
Prepare for your summer genealogy road trips and tours with this episode, including what to pack and the best apps for researching on the road. Ep. 72: May 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: Sponsor Spotlight: Family Tree Tours This episode is sponsored by Family Tree Tours. Family Tree Tours provides a unique travel experience for those who are eager to know more about their family history. Envision meeting family you never knew existed, walking the cobblestoned streets through your ancestors’ village to the church where your great-great-grandfather was married,or visiting with local townsfolk in a beer garden. Whether you choose a privately escorted, group, or independent tour, Family Tree Tours provide you the opportunity to experience the culture of your heritage and create memories for future generations. Visit familytreetours.com. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad A well-weathered genealogy traveler, Diane shares what key supplies and tools you should be packing for your family history trip. Top Tips: Genealogy Destinations In this Top Tips segment we help you cross one or more of America’s top genealogy research and history destinations off your bucket list this summer. Dana McCullough is here to give us guiding tips from her article Genealogy Adventure Awaits which appears in the July/August issue of Family Tree Magazine. 101 Best Websites: Evernote In this segment, Lisa shares Evernote tips and tricks for on-the-go research! Family Tree Tours: President Kathy Wurth Lisa and Kathy discuss tips for successfully planning a wonderful family history tour.  Learn more at familytreetours.com. Family Tree University: Using Your iPad for Genealogy Lisa recommends these tablet apps for research away from home: •    Google Earth•    Evernote•    Dropbox•    SplashTop From the Publisher’s Desk: Genealogy Tool Bag Allison shares here “must-bring” items for hitting the road: 1.   Smartphone for using camera and apps2.   Flash drive3.

Record and Preserve Your Family’s Story: Episode 71
Apr 15 2014 51 mins  
For many genealogists, the goal of their research is to share it with future generations. This month, learn about some helpful tools for doing just that. Ep. 71: April 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad In this episode, Diane discusses the importance of preserving family history through our own written works. In the blog post below, she breaks down eight signals you can find in your own research that indicate you should start writing your family’s story. Top Tips: Preserving Memories Your grandchild is the cherished next chapter of your family’s story, so what’s the best way to capture and share your own memories so that you can pass them on? Stories from My Grandparent – An Heirloom Journal for your Grandchild is a book that prompts you tell your life story in your own words, from childhood to the present day. Author Susan Adcox joins us to discuss recording those defining moments. 101 Best Websites: Library of Congress James Sweany, Head of Local History and Genealogy Reference Services at the Library of Congress takes you on a tour of the website. Family Tree University: Create a Family History Book You’ve worked hard to uncover your family’s history, and you want to preserve your research in a form that will stand the test of time—a keepsake book that can be shared today as well as archived for future generations. If you’ve ever thought such a project was too overwhelming or that you had to fully complete your research before you could create your story, this simply isn’t true. Family history books come in all flavors, from collections of family recipes to compilations of oral history interviews. Lisa Alzo returns to the show to give us some pointers from her Family Tree University course: Creating a Family History Book. From the Publisher’s Desk: Preservation Resources Allison shares some of her favorite books for preserving memories, including My Life and Times and Family Tree Memory Keeper. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Combating Brick Walls: Episode 70
Mar 14 2014 50 mins  
Because brick walls are such a consistent nuisance for genealogists, learn how to combat them with the latest tips and tricks from the experts. Ep. 70, March 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: Sponsor Spotlight: Epigenealogy Your family health history might be one of the strongest influences on your own health risks, for many types of disease. With knowledge, you have the most to gain from lifestyle changes and health screenings.  Visit our website at www.epigenealogy.com to get started on your journey of identifying your family’s  health risks. Epigenealogy, Providing Research Services to Trace Your Family’s Health History.  News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad After being inspired by our recent webinar on Genealogy Problem Solving, Diane started thinking about strategies that have helped her solve problems in her family history research. She looked back on some old blog posts and camp up with these six tips. Top Tips: German Genealogy Would you like to follow your family tree back to its roots in Bavaria, Baden, Prussia, Hesse, Saxony and beyond? German research has its unique set of challenges, and here to give us some tips for overcoming them is Jim Beidler, author of the new Family Tree German Genealogy Guide. 101 Best Websites: Digital Public Library of America Dan Cohen, Executive Director of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) takes on a tour of this exciting website. * DPLA: Introduction to the Digital Public Library of America? by Lisa Louise Cooke* National Archives and Digital Public Library of America Family Tree University: Unpuzzling County Boundaries As the population proliferated in places your ancestors settled, counties were often cut into a collection of confusing and chaotic pieces: subdivided, renamed and rearranged—potentially wreaking havoc on your knowledge of where to look for records. Early-settler ancestors may have lived in several different counties without ever having moved an inch. David Fryxell shares tips that will help you figure out those shifting county boundaries and how to tell which county has the genealogy records you are searching for in this on-demand video presentation: Unpuzzling County Boundary Changes. From the Publisher’s Desk: Genealogy Solutions Allison shares some of her favorite genealogy solutions from Marsh Hoffman Rising’s book  Family Tree Problem Solver.


The Latest High-Tech Genealogy Research Tools: Episode 69
Feb 13 2014 44 mins  
On the heels of the annual RootsTech conference, learn about the latest high-tech research tools, including the massive databases on Ancestry.com. Ep. 69: February 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: From the Publisher’s Desk: Genealogy at RootsTech Allison and Lisa catch up on the genealogy conference scene live from the RootsTech exhibit hall. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Ancestry.com offers a wealth of genealogical data: 31,000 databases with more than 9 billion historical records, to be exact. Diane discusses ideas to make the most of this popular online resource from her blog post: 6 Simple Ways (3 Are Free) to Use Ancestry.com. Top Tips: Online Genealogy Family Tree Magazine Editor Diane Haddad provides a sneak peek at the March/April 2014 issue, with a special focus on online genealogy. This issue features guides to 20 popular genealogy websites, including Ancestry.com, MyHeritage, FindMyPast and others honored on Family Tree Magazine‘s annual 101 Best Websites list. 101 Best Websites: FamilySearch.org Lisa chats with FamilySearch’s Brian Edwards about the latest developments on FamilySearch.org, the free genealogy website of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sponsor Spotlight: Backblaze Founder and CEO Gleb Budman explains how to back up all varieties of genealogy files using the Backblaze online backup service. Family Tree University Crash Course: Winter 2014 Virtual Conference Online Editor Tyler Moss joins Lisa to discuss how to participate in the upcoming Family Tree University Winter 2014 Virtual Conference. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

The 175th Anniversary of Photography: Episode 68
Jan 16 2014 45 mins  
In honor of the 175th Anniversary of Photography, learn about the history of photography as well as photo editing and retouching for genealogists. Ep. 68: January 2014 Back to the episode list In this episode: 175th Anniversary of Photography Photography has a long and fascinating history. The photographic negative process was discovered by William Henry Fox Talbot, the owner of Lacock Abbey in 1835, and he later discovered the actual process of reproducing images through negatives when he reproduced a grainy image of a window of the Abbey. In an article published on February 25 of 1839 Johann von Maedler, an astronomer from Berlin used the word photography in a German newspaper.But it was just a few months later that same year, 175 years ago, that Sir John Herschel in a lecture before the Royal Society of London, made the word “photography” known to the world. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Editor Diane Haddad explains how some of the biggest websites in genealogy are incorporating old photographs. Top Tips: From the Photo Detective Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective joins Lisa for a discussion of the history of photography. 101 Best Websites: What Was There In this episode we dig into the What Was There website that helps you incorporate past photos with the present. Lisa’s special guest is Laurel Erickson, Founder of WhatWasThere.com. Family Tree University: Photo Editing and Retouching Instructor Nancy Hendrickson joins Lisa to provide tips for retouching and restoring old family photos from the Photo Editing and Retouching for Genealogists webinar. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison gives us her picks for this month from the Family Tree Shop. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Discovering Your Ethnic Heritage: Episode 66
Nov 15 2013 43 mins  
Learn about your immigrant ancestors with tips and tricks for researching Germany, Norway, the Czech Republic and more. Ep. 66: November 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad brings us up to speed on the latest news from the blogosphere. Top Tips: Religious Records Religious records are key to tracing your German roots in Germany. Rick Crume stops by to guide us to our German ancestor’s church records using the six steps he outlines in his article “Going to Church” from the November 2013 issue of Family Tree Magazine: #1 Acquaint yourself with German church records#2 Identify your immigrant ancestor’s parish#3 Check online church records#4 Rent FamilySearch microfilm#5 Write to German churches#6 Contact German Archives 101 Best Websites: National Archives of Norway One of the shining stars on the Internet that offer rays of research hope for those with Norwegian heritage is the National Archives of Norway’s Digital Archive. Lisa’s special guest: Yngve Nedrebø, Chief archivist at Riksarkivet. Family Tree University: Discovering Your Czech and Slovak Roots Researchers with Czech or Slovak roots often battle certain brick walls—do surname issues, border changes and language troubles sound all too familiar to you? Lisa A. Alzo, a specialist in Eastern European genealogy, and she discusses some of the tools and tricks for tracking down those hard-to-find ancestors from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Czechoslovakia, which she covers in her Family Tree University class, “Discovering Your Czech and Slovak Roots: Strategies for Searching Over Here and Over There.” The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison gives us her picks for this month from the Family Tree Shop. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Digitize Your Home Movies: Episode 65
Oct 15 2013 43 mins  
It’s Family History Month! This episode, learn how to convert old home videos, organize your genealogy and how to use the site Tribal Pages. Ep. 65: October 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad brings us up to speed on the latest news from the blogosphere. Top Tips: Converting Home Movies Now is the time to convert your old home movies to digital before they deteriorate. But how? In the October/November 2013 issue of Family Tree Magazine author Rick Crume provides five options and loads of information to help you get the job done in his article “5 Ways to Digitize Home Movies.” 101 Best Websites: Tribal Pages Ravi Rao, the Founder of the Tribal Pages website joins Lisa to talk about how genealogists can use the site’s tools to document and share their family history. Family Tree University: Organize Your Genealogy Author and instructor Lisa Alzo provides tips for getting your genealogy organized from her Family Tree University course called Organize Your Genealogy: Get Your Research in Order (and Keep It That Way.) The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison announced a brand new feature that is launching in the October/November issue of Family Tree Magazine: Workbook Pullouts! Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Geography and Genealogy: Episode 64
Sep 17 2013 44 mins  
This month’s theme is Genealogy and Geography. Learn how to trace your ancestral village, how to add “local flavor” to your genealogy and more. Ep. 64: September 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Listen as Diane shares some of her favorite money-saving genealogy resources. Top Tips: Local Flavor One of the best ways to spice up your family history is by adding a dash of local flavor. Background details of your ancestors’ everyday lives like the fashion of the day, the foods they ate and local scandals rocking their neighborhood can all help you understand where they were coming from, and can also sweeten up your storytelling. In this episode, Sunny Jane Morton, author of the article “Local Flavor” from the Sept. 2013 issue of the magazine, shares some of the homegrown ingredients that will help you cook up fresh genealogical discoveries. 101 Best Websites: HistoryGeo.com Come explore our featured website, HistoryGeo.com, with Greg Boyd, Creator and President of HistoryGeo. Greg also introduces us to his new First Landowners Project. Family Tree University: Finding Your Ancestral Village Most genealogists hope to “cross the pond” as quickly as possible—but to do that you need to know the name of the town or village where your ancestor lived. In this episode you’ll get tips on how to identify your ancestor’s place of origin from Lisa Alzo, the instructor of the Family Tree University course called Finding Your Ancestral Village.  The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan 
In recognition of National Disaster Preparedness Month, join us for the live webinar:Disaster Preparedness for GenealogistsSeptember 25, 2013 at 7pm EST.Presented by Denise May Levenick Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

101 Best Genealogy Websites: Episode 63
Aug 13 2013 35 mins  
Learn about some of this year’s best websites, including the Newberry Library, FamilySearch.org, Ancestry.com and My Genealogy Hound. Ep. 63: August 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane and Lisa discuss the new season of the TV series “Who Do You Think You Are?” on the TLC channel. Listen to Lisa’s interview with Allie Orton, Producer of “Who Do You Think You Are?” on Genealogy Gems Podcast Episode 158. Top Tips & 101 Best Websites We combine the Top Tips segment together with the 101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Roots Segment to devote more time to the brand new 101 Best Websites list for 2013. Author David Fryxell shares some of his favorites from the list that debuts in the Sept 2013 issue. Websites Dave Mentions: * Alabama Mosaic* Portal to Texas History* My Genealogy Hound* Newberry Library – New Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey* FamilySearch – New databases, images, family tree, photos* Ancestry* Norwegian National Archives Apps: * Ancestry* WorldCat* Find A Grave* MyHeritage* What Was There Family Tree University: Become an Ancestry.com Power User Online Editor Tyler Moss joins Lisa to provide tips for getting the most from Ancestry.com from the “Become an Ancestry.com Power User” course at FTU. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan This month, Allison recommends: Family Tree University’s Fall 2013 Virtual Genealogy Conference. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Civil War Roots: Episode 62
Jul 16 2013 39 mins  
Learn how to find your Gettysburg ancestors, honor the battlefield with a virtual visit and learn to navigate the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System website. Ep. 62: July 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Listen as Diane shares some news about virtual tours of Gettysburg. Top Tips: 150th Anniversary of Gettysburg July 2013 is the Gettysburg 150th anniversary. Lisa talks with David Fryxell about his “7 Steps to Discovering Your Gettysburg Ancestors” article from the July/August 2013 issue of the magazine. 101 Best Websites: Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database Genealogy instructor Diana Crisman Smith takes us on a tour of the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System website by the National Parks Service. Family Tree University: Civil War Research The “Civil War Research: Find Your Ancestors in the War Between the States” course at Family Tree University will guide you in determining your ancestor’s service, finding the records to document it and fleshing out your knowledge of their lives. Course instructor Diana Crisman Smith provides tips from the class. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan This month, Allison recommends: The book Life in Civil War America by Michael Varhola. Family Tree Magazine Podcast: Episode 35, April 2011, Interview with Michael Varhola. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!





Heritage in Historical Photography: Episode 57
Feb 13 2013 37 mins  
In this episode, learn tips on historic photo identification and preservation from the Family Photo Detective Ep. 57: February 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: Top Tips: Family Photo Detective Family photos capture some of the most meaningful moments in life—wedding, babies, graduations, military service and holidays. Your old family photos are full of important family history clues. Maureen Taylor’s book, Family Photo Detective, helps you identify and research these clues that can further your genealogy research. Maureen is a photo identification expert and the author of the Family Tree Magazine’s Photo Detective blog and magazine column. She joins us for this episode devoted to Historical Photography to give us some tips on identification and preservation. 101 Best Websites: DeadFred.com When genealogists think about historical photography, one of the first websites that should come to mind is Dead Fred. It’s a catchy name for a site that catches the hopes of those who want to identify unknown photos, or to be reunited with old photos from their families that went astray. Joe Bott, the founder of Dead Fred, joins us in this episode to discuss using the site. Family Tree University: Picture Your Family History Family Tree University’s Power Courses are designed to give you an intense dose of learning on one specific topic. In the time it takes to watch a movie, you’ll give your research skills a huge boost and come away with new tools and techniques that you can use immediately to find your ancestors. In this segment Tyler Moss, Online Editor at Family Tree Magazine, joins Lisa to discuss the Picture Your Family History Power Course, and provides some tips you can use right away. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan In this episode Allison’s recommends the following resources: * Black History Month Special Offer: 50% off Finding African-American Ancestors in Newspapers* Family Tree University Winter 2013 Virtual Conference Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Explore Online Resources: Episode 56
Jan 14 2013 35 mins  
This month, explore genealogy online by learning about Google Books, WikiTree.com, Ancestry.com and the Ultimate Google for Genealogists Collection. Ep. 56, January 2013 Back to the episode list In this episode: Top Tips: Inside Google Books Has someone already written a local or family history book relevant to your genealogy? Use Google Books to find out. In this episode, Family Tree Magazine Contributing Editor Rick Crume, author of the article “Hitting the Books (Jan./Feb. 2013 issue), explains how. 101 Best Websites: WikiTree.com Lisa talks with Chris Whitten, Founder of WikiTree.com. Family Tree University: Mastering Ancestry.com With 5 billion historical records, Ancestry.com can unlock valuable information about your family—if you know how to make the most of its search and other tools. Tyler Moss, Family Tree Magazine’s Online Editor, provides search tips from the recorded webinar: “Your Unofficial Guide to Ancestry.com.” The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Lisa and Allison discuss ways that listeners and readers can get involved with Family Tree Magazine. In this episode Allison’s recommends the following resources: * Ultimate Google for Genealogists Collection* Organize Your Family History Value Pack Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Digitize Your Documents and Photos: Episode 54
Nov 15 2012 32 mins  
This month, give thanks for your family by digitizing your documents and photos. Learn tricks for scanning old pictures, and get the details on digital photography essentials. Ep. 54: November 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares what’s new in the world of genealogy, including Ancestry.com’s big time buyer. Top Tips: Scanning Secrets and Preserving Photos When it comes to digitizing your family history, scanning old family photos is one of the first things that comes to mind. In this episode, the Family Curator Denise May Levenick is here to give us some scanning advice from her new book How to Archive Family Keepsakes: Learn How to Preserve Family Photos, Memorabilia, & Genealogy Records. Best Websites: Family History on Facebook These days, like it or not, Facebook is one of the most common digital homes for our family history and photos. In the 101 Best Websites segment, Tyler Moss, online editor of for Family Tree Magazine, is here to talk about this new phenomenon. Family Tree University: Digital Photography Essentials Photography is an essential tool for genealogists—not only for capturing current family memories, but also for preserving old documents and heirlooms. Family Tree University’s Digital Photography Essentials course will help you master the basics of using digital cameras, photo editing software and scanners in your genealogy work. Tyler Moss provides tips from the class. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan n this episode Allison recommends the following resources: * Ultimate Organize Your Genealogy Collection* Flip-Pal Portable Scanner Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

A Grave Podcast: Episode 53
Oct 19 2012 42 mins  
This month, celebrate Halloween by learning how to navigate a cemetery, tips and tricks for tombstones and the benefits of Find a Grave. Ep. 53: October 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares what’s new in the world of genealogy, including some big-time acquisitions. Top Tips: Crack the Tombstone Code Lisa dips into the Family Tree Magazine Podcast archive. In a 2009 interview with Sharon Debartolo Carmack, Sharon explains how to crack the tombstone code and glean more than just names and dates. Best Websites: Preserving Genealogy in Historic Cemeteries FTU instructor and active Find a Grave volunteer Diana Crisman Smith explains how you can help preserve the genealogy in historic cemeteries and make it accessible to fellow genealogists. Family Tree University: Cemetery Research 101 Family Tree University Instructor Midge Frazel shares a few tips from her Cemetery 101 class: Cemetery Research 101: Dig Up Your Family History. The course is designed for the beginner cemetery researcher with some knowledge of genealogy, and uses cemeteries in the student’s home area to prepare them for finding their own ancestors. Tip #1: The Dead Live At Find-a-Grave. Look here first before leaving home. Use maps to find the location (street/GPS). Tip #2: The Dead Can Move. Cemetery names change over time, people can be disinterred and move to a new cemetery (the death record/book, family notes lists the wrong location). Tip #3: The Dead Can Talk. * Find the cemetery office/superintendent by phone, email or before setting out to the cemetery get from them the cemetery map, plot # card, date of burial, burials without stones* Ask for help* Remember your manners* Bring them treats or a check* Find out where the Town/City Hall is located* Use the bathroom* Take as many photos as you can of the stone (front, back, all sides/angles), and a photo of you with your ancestor as a separate shot* Take photos of the surrounding stones (or write down the surnames) Tip #4: Visit the Dead with a Boneyard Buddy. When you get to the cemetery or burial location, pretend you are going to have to direct another person to the location. Take photos or videos of the entrance, the sign, the parking or a surrounding landmark and write down how to get to the section you located. I can guarantee that if you don’t do this, you will have to go back. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan In this episode, Allison shares Tombstone Rubbings Dos and Don’ts. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Preventative Medicine for Your Research: Episode 52
Sep 13 2012 47 mins  
This month, practice some preventative medicine with your family tree by guarding it from sick sources and learn what DNA tests can reveal about your genealogy. Ep. 52, September 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares what’s new in the world of genealogy, including some apps that can help you go mobile with your family research. Top Tips: Recognizing Sick Sources Every family tree is vulnerable to fall victim to diseased records. Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, the family tree doctor, is in the house and she’s going to give you tips for recognizing sick sources and preventing them from infecting your research. Her article “Preventative Medicine” appears in the October/November 2012 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Using a DNA Test Lisa talks with Bennett Greenspan, founder and president of FamilyTreeDNA, about using DNA as a tool to validate or disprove your research.. Family Tree University: Source Documentation 101 Family Tree University Instructor Charlotte Bocage shares a few tricks for citing your sources. Learn more about Charlotte’s class: Source Documentation 101. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan In this episode Allison recommends the following books: * Evidence! by Elizabeth Shown Mills* Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills* Family Tree Problem Solver by Marsha Hoffman Rising* Step-by-Step Guide: Improve Your Research Skills by Sunny Morton Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Mobile Genealogy: Episode 51
Aug 20 2012 42 mins  
Take your genealogy on the road with some great new mobile apps, learn tips and tricks for family history travel and tour the top mobile websites of 2012. Ep. 51: August 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares what’s new in the world of genealogy, including new genealogy apps that can help your research go mobile: * Flip-Pal Mobile Scanner and Accessories* Saving Memories Forever* Ancestry App Top Tips: Family History Travel Denise Levenick, creator of The Family Curator blog, provides travel tips from her article “No Place Like Home” from the July/August 2012 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Mobile Genealogy Lisa talks with David A. Fryxell about the best mobile websites for genealogists. The brand new “101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Roots” list for 2012 was just announced in the September 2012 issue. Family Tree University: Discovering Your Czech and Slovak Roots Family Tree University Instructor Lisa Alzo shares her recent international family history travel experience. Learn more about Lisa’s class, Discovering Your Czech and Slovak Roots. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan In this episode Allison recommends: The Family Tree University Fall Virtual Conference, Sept. 14–16, 2012. Enter into a sweepstakes for the chance to win a free registration! Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Finding Historical Context: Episode 49
Jun 27 2012 41 mins  
Find out the best websites for putting your ancestors in historical context and get a taste of your family’s food history. Ep. 49: June 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane explains how to locate archived genealogy blog posts on any subject. Top Tips: Discover Your Food Heritage Gena Philibert Ortega, shares ideas from her new book From the Family Kitchen, Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes for capturing our culinary family history. 101 Best Websites: Putting Lives in Context Lisa talks with author David Fryxell about some of the best websites for adding context to your ancestors’ lives: * Arkansas History Commission*  Digital Library of Georgia* Encyclopedia of Alabama* Florida Memory Project* Kentucky Historical Society* American Memory Project Family Tree University Crash Course: Find Your Ancestors in American News Sources Family Tree University instructor James Beidler provides ideas on how to get the scoop on events and attitudes of your ancestor’s era through newspapers from his course Newspaper Research 101: Find Your Ancestors in American News Sources. Recommended Website: Chronicling America The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Discover the story behind common items that filled your ancestors’ lives in the History Matters column in every issue of Family Tree Magazine.  Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Understanding the 1862 Homestead Act: Episode 48
May 17 2012 43 mins  
Understanding the 1862 Homestead Act, using the Newberry Atlas of Historical Boundaries, and demystifying confusing land record terms. Ep. 48: May 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including the recent acquisition of Archives.com by Ancestry.com. Top Tips: The 1862 Homestead Act Dive into land records with a discussion of the 1862 Homestead Act with Thomas MacEntee. Learn more from his video class from the Family Tree University Spring 2012 Virtual Conference. 101 Best Websites: Newberry Atlas of Historical County Boundaries Lisa talks with author Nancy Hendrickson about the Newberry Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. Family Tree University Crash Course: Top 5 Confusing Land Terms Family Tree University instructor Diana Crisman Smith sheds light on confusing terms you might find as you review your ancestors’ land records. Diana teaches FTU’s Land Records 101 course. Social Media Minute Kerry Scott returns to talk about why Facebook’s new timeline has a silver lining for genealogists. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us more about the Land Records Research Value Pack, the Ultimate Photo Preservation Collection, and the Jewish Genealogy Value Pack. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Finding Living Relatives: Episode 46
Mar 30 2012 43 mins  
Finding living relatives, verifying data from online family trees, and an interview with Daniel Horowitz, Chief Genealogist at MyHeritage.com. Ep. 46: March 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including the latest on NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” Top Tips: Verifying Information From Online Family Trees You can find a lot of information in online family trees, but it’s critical to verify the data you uncover. Nancy Hendrickson joins us to discuss some strategies from her article, “One in a Million,” which appears in the March/April issue of Family Tree Magazine, and her upcoming book Discover Your Family History Online. Best Websites: MyHeritage.com Lisa talks with Daniel Horowitz, Chief Genealogist at MyHeritage.com. Family Tree University Crash Course: Finding Living Relatives Family Tree University instructor Thomas MacEntee gives tips on how to use online family trees to locate living relatives from his on-demand webinar, They’re Alive! Finding Living Relatives. Don’t miss Thomas’ Toolkit article, “Tools to Locate Living Relatives,” which features five great tools you’re going to want to use. You can find it in the March/April 2012 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Social Media Minute Kerry Scott returns to talk about how you can use Facebook to learn more about your ancestors’ hometowns. Check out the Facebook page for Glenbeulah, Wis. to see a sample of what you might find. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us more about the Woman’s History Month Value Pack and the Farmer’s Wife Sampler Quilt. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Social Security Death Index: Episode 45
Feb 24 2012 39 mins  
The campaign to save the Social Security Death Index, an interview with Mocavo’s Chief Genealogist, a sneak peek at the Spring 2012 Virtual Conference! Ep. 45: February 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including RPAC’s “Stop ID Theft NOW!” campaign to save the SSDI and brightsolid’s new pay-as-you-go census records site. Top Tips: From the Special Discover Your Roots Issue Author and instructor Lisa Alzo covers some genealogy fundamentals from her new article, “Matters of Principle” from the special Spring 2012 Discover Your Roots issue of Family Tree Magazine. 101 Best Websites: Mocavo Lisa talks with Michael J. Leclerc, Chief Genealogist at Mocavo. Family Tree University Crash Course: A Variety of Online Genealogy Education Options Kerry Scott from Family Tree University explains the online genealogy courses available to suit all experience levels, budgets and time constraints. Social Media Minute Kerry Scott returns to talk about how hashtags can enhance your genealogy conference experience—even if you’re stuck at home. You can search for hashtags even if you’re not a Twitter user. Be sure to follow the #FTUVC hashtag during the Spring 2012 Virtual Conference. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us more about Family Tree University’s Spring 2012 Virtual Conference. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Catch Up with MyHeritage’s Daniel Horowitz: Episode 44
Jan 24 2012 42 mins  
Finding living relatives, verifying data from online family trees and an interview with Daniel Horowitz, Chief Genealogist at MyHeritage.com. Ep. 44: January 2012 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including Ancestry.com’s plans for 2012 and the celebrities scheduled to appear on Season 3 of NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” Top Tips: From the February Issue Managing Editor Diane Haddad returns to share tips from the February 2012 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Evernote Lisa and Online Community Editor Kerry Scott discuss why Evernote is an ideal tool for genealogists. You can learn more about Evernote and a variety of other genealogy topics by attending Family Tree University’s Spring 2012 Virtual Conference. Family Tree University Crash Course: Organize Your Family Archive Denise Levenick from The Family Curator shares tips from the her recent Organize Your Family Archive webinar. Social Media Minute Kerry Scott returns to talk about the one thing you can do to make it much easier to connect with fellow genealogists online. Facebook, Twitter and Google+ are among the most popular social media sites for genealogists to connect. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us about the January’s Ultimate Get Organized Collection. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Navigating Naming Conventions: Episode 43
Dec 22 2011 40 mins  
This month’s podcast features tips on naming conventions, as well as a discussion of the Western States Historical Marriage Index. Ep. 43: December 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: Sponsor Spotlight: Visit Salt Lake Visit Salt Lake is the go-to website for any family historian planning a visit to Salt Lake City, Utah. Read Lisa Louise Cooke’s genealogy blog posts at the Visit Salt Lake blog.  News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including a new mapping tool called Historypin and MyHeritage’s acquisition of FamilyLink and BackUpMyTree.com. Top Tips: Name Dropping David Fryxell, author of the article “Name Dropping” in the January 2012 issue, shares insight into naming conventions. Best Websites: Western States Historical Marriage Index Lisa Louise Cooke talks about what you can find in the Western States Historical Marriage Index, a BYU Idaho Special Collections & Family History website. You can find a list of counties by state here. If you’d like to help, you can volunteer by emailing [email protected] Family Tree University Crash Course: First Steps Kerry Scott talks about Family Tree University’s new “First Steps” courses for new genealogists. Social Media Minute In this new segment, Online Community Editor Kerry Scott talks about Google+, the new networking tool from Google that has taken the online genealogy community by storm. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Dolan Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us about the four vital things every genealogist should do this month. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Preserving Your Family’s Recipes: Episode 42
Nov 19 2011 37 mins  
Tips on how to get relatives to discuss family history, a discussion of the Historic American Cookbook Project and news on the Genealogists for Families project at Kiva.com. Ep. 42: November 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including the shutdown of the Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness (RAOGK) website and the Genealogists for Families project at Kiva.com. Top Tips: Getting Relatives to Talk About Family History Tips from Family Archivist columnist Sunny Jane Morton’s article “Family Feast” from the January 2012 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Sunny’s new book is My Life & Times: A Guided Journal for Collecting Your Stories. Best Websites: Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project The Michigan State University Library and the Michigan State University Museum have partnered to create an online collection of some of the most influential and important American cookbooks from the late 18th to early 20th centuries. Digital images of the pages of each cookbook are available, as well as full-text transcriptions and the ability to search within the books across the collection in order to find specific information. Our special guest is Peter Berg, Head of Special Collections and Associate Director for Special Collections and Preservation. Family Tree University Crash Course: Create a Family History Book Creating a family history book is a great way to preserve your family’s story and share it with others. Family Tree University instructor Nancy Hendrickson tells us more about her course on how to create a family history book. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Using Autosomal DNA to Solve Family Mysteries: Episode 41
Oct 19 2011 57 mins  
In this episode we explore using autosomal DNA testing to solve family mysteries, planning a research trip to Salt Lake City and more. Ep. 41: October 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent news in the genealogical community, including the release of two long-awaited software programs: Family Tree Maker 2012 and Personal Historian 2. Top Tips: Using Autosomal DNA Testing Blaine Bettinger, author of the article “More Power to You” in the December 2011 issue, discusses how he used autosomal tests to solve a family mystery. Blaine blogs at The Genetic Genealogist. Best Websites: Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation DNA offers family historians some exciting options. In this episode, we profile the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF) website to learn more about what is available to family historians.  Our special guest is Dr. Ugo A. Perego, Director of Operations and a senior researcher at the non-profit organization. Sponsor Spotlight: Visit Salt Lake Visit Salt Lake is the go-to website for any family historian planning a visit to Salt Lake City, Utah. Read Lisa Louise Cooke’s genealogy blog posts at the Visit Salt Lake blog.  Meet Kerry Scott Get to know Kerry Scott, the newest member of the Family Tree Magazine staff. Kerry is the new online Community Editor for Family Tree Magazine and Family Tree University. She also blogs at Clue Wagon. Family Tree University Crash Course: Land Records Land records are fascinating. Family Tree University instructor Diana Crisman Smith shares tips from her Land Records 101 course to help you mine land records for their genealogical gold. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine and tells us about the Family History Month Daily Deal & Giveaway. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke

A Tour of the Periodical Source Index (PERSI): Episode 40
Sep 26 2011 38 mins  
Search secrets for online newspaper collections, as well as pointers for using the Periodical Source Index to find articles about your ancestry. Ep. 40: September 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives the scoop on recent census news, including Archives.com’s plans to add all US census records and Ancestry.com’s announcement that it will offer free access to the 1940 census, along with hints for finding your family’s 1940 census enumeration district. Top Tips: Searching Online Newspaper Collections Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Rick Crume shares tips from his article “Netting the News” in the November 2011 issue. Rick’s Top Tips: * Browse through online newspapers available in online collections to see which ones have newspapers covering the places and time periods where your ancestors lived.* Carefully word your query. Try different search terms and keep in mind that some sites have search limitations.* If your ancestor’s hometown newspaper isn’t online, request a microfilmed copy on interlibrary loan. Best Websites: PERSI Allison Stacy gives an overview of the Periodical Source Index (PERSI) at HeritageQuestOnline, a fabulous resource for tracking down family history periodicals. Ask your library if it subscribes to HeritageQuest Online, and whether you can access the service from home using a library card. Watch Allison and Diane’s video tour of the Allen County Public Library, which created PERSI: Family Tree University Crash Course: Historical Books on the Web Family Tree University instructor Nancy Hendrickson provides tips on how to find family history publications from her on-demand webinar Historical Books on the Web. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison takes you behind the scenes at Family Tree Magazine, explaining how the issues of America’s favorite family history publication come together. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for grea...

Tracing Your Roots in the Old Country: Episode 39
Aug 16 2011 32 mins  
Tips for tracing your roots in the old country, including a crash course in German genealogy with Family Tree University instructor Jim Beidler. Ep. 39: August 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Is your family photo collection a mess? Learn how to enter Family Tree Magazine’s contest to win photo organizing supplies and advice. Plus: Get the scoop on newly added international records on FamilySearch.org . Top Tips: Heritage Organizations Author Sunny Morton talks about fraternal ethnic organizations our ancestors belonged to, heritage-focused organizations you can join and more tips from her article “Culture Club” in the November 2011 issue. Best Websites: Genlias Sunny Morton returns to tell us about Genlias, a key website for genealogists researching Dutch ancestors. Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University Instructor Jim Beidler shares tips from his Find Your German Roots course. The Publisher’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison chats with us about Family Tree University’s Summer 2011 Virtual Conference. Join us August 19-21, 2011, or check out the on-demand sessions available for purchase on Family Tree Shop. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Preparing for the 1940 Census Release: Episode 38
Jul 14 2011 42 mins  
Get acquainted with Family Tree Magazine’s 101 Best Websites of 2011. David A. Fryxell points out some of his favorite resources. Ep. 38: July 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad It’s never too early to start preparing for next year’s 1940 census release. Diane chats with us about finding your ancestor’s 1940 census enumeration district. Top Tips: 101 Best Websites Author David Fryxell shares some of his personal favorites from his new article Dazzling Destinations covering the 101 Best Websites from the September 2011 issue of the magazine. Dave’s favorites include: * Daughters of the American Revolution* Virginia Memory* Cook County Illinois Vital Records* One Step Web Pages by Steve Morse Sponsor Spotlight: Visit Salt Lake Visit Salt Lake is the go-to website for any family historian planning a visit to Salt Lake City, Utah. Read Lisa Louise Cooke’s genealogy blog posts at the Visit Salt Lake blog.  Safe Keeping: Online Backup Services Grace offers advice on backing up your digital files. Check out these four services: * BackupMyTree* Carbonite* DropBox* Mozy Family Tree University Crash Course FTU Dean Grace Dobush interviews Lisa Louise Cooke about her Google Earth for Genealogy course. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison chats with us about Family Tree University’s Summer 2011 Virtual Conference. Join us August 19-21, 2011, at a genealogy conference you can attend in your slippers. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s 




All About Civil War Research: Episode 35
Apr 14 2011 39 mins  
April’s episode is all about Civil War and military research. We chat with Michael Varhola, the author of Life in Civil War America. Ep. 35: April 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Jamie chats with us about the special Civil War events Family Tree Magazine is up to this month. Top Tips: Civil War Research Civil War expert Michael Varhola, author of the book Life in Civil War America, provides tips on Civil War research and gives some background how our ancestors lived at that time. Best Websites: Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System This month we look at one of the premiere Civil War websites, the National Parks Service’s Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, with Mike Litterst, national communications coordinator for the National Park Service’s Civil War 150th Anniversary commemoration. Safe Keeping: Military Uniforms Grace provides shares ideas for preserving military uniforms. Read more in the following articles: * May 2011 Family Archivist* Heir Apparel* Clothes Call* November 2009 Preserving Memories Family Tree University Crash Course Instructor Diana Crisman Smith shares some research tips from the Family Tree University class US Military Records: Trace Your Ancestors’ Service. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison talks about some new resources at great savings. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Best Websites for Irish Resources: Episode 34
Mar 15 2011 44 mins  
Trying to find an ancestors whose case has gone cold? Lisa Alzo offers brick wall busting strategies from our March 2011 issue. Ep. 34: March 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Jamie gives us the scoop on the latest and greatest from the Genealogy Insider blog. Top Tips: Cold Cases Author and Family Tree University instructor Lisa Alzo provides brick wall busting strategies from her article “Cold Cases” in the March 2011 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Irish Resources Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, Lisa pulls several great websites for researching Irish Ancestors from the 2010 101 Best Websites list. * Genuki* National Archives of Ireland 1911 Census* The Irish National Archives Collection* Ireland’s History in Maps* Country Tyrone Website Safe Keeping: Preserving Digital Photos Grace provides shares ideas for preserving your digital images. Here are links to the resources mentioned: * Picasa* Photoscape* Photoshop Elements Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University instructor Charlotte Bocage talks about the importance of citing your research sources and share some tips from her Family Tree University class, Source Documentation 101: How to Cite Genealogy Sources Accurately and Effectively. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison talks about some new resources at great savings. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Resources for African American Research: Episode 33
Feb 16 2011 43 mins  
February is Black History Month, and this edition of the podcast is chock full of great resources for African-American researchers. Ep. 33: February 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Jamie, filling in for Diane, who’s on maternity leave, gives us the scoop on “Who Do You Think You Are?” Top Tips: African-American Research Author and lecturer Tim Pinnick, who teaches FTU’s Finding African-American Ancestors in Newspapers course, provides tips on how to find African-American ancestors in newspapers from his upcoming article from the May 2011 issue of Family Tree Magazine. He recommends these resources: * Bibliographic Checklist of African-American Newspapers by Barbara K. Henritze* African-American Newspapers and Periodicals by James Danky* African-American news at Chronicling America Best Websites: AfriGeneas AfriGeneas.com founder Valencia King Nelson gives us a tour of this website devoted to African American research. Visit AfriGeneas here. Safe Keeping: Preserving Black Family History Grace talks about two national projects underway that family historians can contribute to: The Smithsonian National African-American History and Culture Museum and the StoryCorps Griot. Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University online community editor Grace Dobush shares some great research strategies from FTU’s State Crash Course webinar series. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison provides additional resources for African-American family history research. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Starting on the Right Foot: Episode 32
Jan 14 2011 42 mins  
We’ll show you how to get 2011 started on the right foot. We’ve got tips for using a research plan and ways you can make 2011 the year of the heirloom. Ep. 32: January 2011 Back to the episode list In this episode: News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us the scoop on the new FamilySearch website. Top Tips: Using a Research Plan Author Lisa Alzo provides tips on using a Research Plan to organize your research from her article “Road Map to Your Roots” in the January 2011 issue of Family Tree Magazine. See a sample family history research plan here. Best Websites: Evernote Andrew Sinkov, vice president of marketing for Evernote, gives us a tour of the website and innovative ways the website can help you save and remember everything you find online. Safe Keeping: Plans for 2011 Grace offers her tips for getting 2011 started right, with three steps to reaching your preservation goals this year: Set mini-goals. Just start scanning. Invest in quality archival materials. She mentions the Flip-Pal portable scanner, the October and November episodes of the podcast, and recommends these archival suppliers: * Archival Methods, (866) 877-7050* Gaylord Brothers, (800) 962-9580* Hollinger Metal Edge, (800) 634-0491* Light Impressions, (800) 828-6216* University Products, (800) 628-1912 Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University instructor Nancy Hendrickson shares some great ideas for organizing your family history research from her class Organize Your Genealogy. The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison provides additional resources for starting the research year off right. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research idea...

Saving and Sharing Family Memories: Episode 31
Dec 17 2010 43 mins  
Learn how to preserve your family’s legacy. We offer tips for collecting family stories, preserving heirloom recipes and organizing your memories online. Ep. 31: December 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison provides additional resources for preserving memories. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad tells us what’s been going on in the genealogy world. Top Tips: Collecting Family Stories Author Sunny McClellan Morton provides tips on folks to interview when collecting family memories from her article “Oh, the Stories They’ll Tell” in the December 2010 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Arcalife Arcalife CEO and founder Paul Taylor gives you a tour of the website and innovative ways to preserve family memories online.  Safe Keeping: Preserving Family Recipes Grace provides shares ideas for preserving your family’s culinary legacy. Read more about collecting family recipes in the January 2011 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University Instructor Nancy Hendrickson shares some great ideas for creating a family history book from her class Creating a Family History Book: Start-to-Finish Guidance for Assembling and Printing a Family Keepsake. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Focusing on US Research: Episode 30
Nov 12 2010 46 mins  
US research is the focus of this episode, with the best websites for state research and the Washington State Digital Archive Ep. 30, November 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison tells us about some great tools to assist you in your US research. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us a recap of Family History Month and tells us about her experience at the FamilySearch Blogger’s Day. Top Tips: Best State Websites Author David Fryxell gives us the lowdown on the 75 Best State Websites for climbing your family tree from his article “Heads of State” in the December 2010 issue of Family Tree Magazine.  Best Websites: Washington State Digital Archives Washington State Archivist Jerry Handfield of the Washington State Digital Archives gives us a tour of this innovative website loaded with digital records. Safe Keeping: Organizing Your Heirlooms Online community editor Grace gives us some tips on organizing family heirlooms, building on last month’s episode. Read more about organizing your heirlooms in the article “Treasure Tales,” and download the worksheets here: * Download an heirloom inventory* Download an heirloom questionnaire Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University instructor George G. Morgan offers tips for tracking down US vital records from his class Vital Records: Researching Births, Marriages, Deaths and Divorces.   Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Tracing Immigrant Ancestors: Episode 29
Oct 11 2010 38 mins  
In this episode, we’ve got advice on tracing immigrant ancestors, news about Ancestry.com’s acquisition of Footnote.com, Scots-Irish research tips and more. Ep. 29: October 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison tells us about some great tools to tuck in your genealogical tool belt. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us an update on Ancestry.com’s acquisition of Footnote.com. * Ancestry.com to Acquire iArchives and Footnote.com* More on Ancestry.com’s Acquisition of Footnote Top Tips: Trace Your Scots-Irish Roots In the Top Tips segment, author Jim Beidler provides some historical background and solid tips from his article “Trace Your Scots-Irish Roots” in the December 2010 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Family Tree University Crash Course Family Tree University Instructor Lisa Alzo provides you with tips for exploring your ancestor’s international origins from her class Tracing Immigrants: How to Research Your Family’s American Arrivals. Safe Keeping: Culling Your Collection Grace helps you get started paring down your collection of papers, covering what to keep and what to toss. Lisa’s Top Tips * Always begin your research at home when you can.* Before you jump right in and start randomly plugging names into the Ellis Island Database and/or Ancestry.com , be sure to read the Frequently Asked Questions or the Search Tips on how to use the database. Also, use the One-Step Search Tools by Stephen P. Morse.* Tap into Family Tree Magazine Resources, such as the articles Immigration Resources and Ancestral Ports of Immigration.* Register for Lisa’s class Tracing Immigrants: How to Research Your Family’s American Arrivals. Visit Family Tree University to see all the available online classes and webinars. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke


Going Green with Your Research: Episode 28
Sep 15 2010 42 mins  
We’ve got a roundup of portable scanners, advice on going green with your research and a look at the new FamilySearch Beta website. Ep. 28: September 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison gives us some ideas on ways to go green with your research. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us an update on the new FamilySearch Beta website. All the digitized records from Pilot are on Beta, and it’s open to the public. According to Diane it’s “the place to go to search FamilySearch records.” Top Tips: Wide Open Spaces Rick Crume gives you some space saving ideas from his article “Wide Open Spaces” in the November issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Digital Library of Georgia Lisa takes a look at the Digital Library of Georgia website. Family Tree University Crash Course Nancy Hendrickson provides you with tips for digital photography from her FTU class Digital Photography Essentials. Visit Family Tree University to register for more online classes and webinars. Safe Keeping: Portable Scanners Grace Dobush talks about new scanners that are small enough to take on your next research trip. PlanOn DocuPen X seriesPrice: $299-$399Weight: 2.5 oz.Power source: Battery rechargeable through USB cableStorage method: Uses an SD memory cardOperating systems: Windows 2000, XP, Vista and 7, Mac 10.5 and 10.6Features: pen style; scans to JPG and TIFF; 150-1200 dpi; freescans. VuPoint Magic WandPrice: $99.99Weight: 7.5 oz.Power source: 2 AA batteriesStorage method: uses a Micro SD card up to 32GBOperating systems: Windows XP and Vista, Mac 10.4 and aboveFeatures: pen style; scans to JPG; 300-600 dpi; 10 inches long; freescans. IrisPen 6 (Express, Executive or Translator)Price: $129-$199Weight: 1.8 oz.Power source: Powered by USBStorage method: no built-in memory; must be connected to a computerOperating systems: Windows XP, Vista or 7; Mac 10.3.9 or newer; requires USB portFeatures: pen style; scans text in black and white; exports text to any application you can type in; OCR (that’s optical character recognition) for 128 languages; Translator version works in six languages. IRIScan Anywhere 2Price: $199Weight: 1 lb.Power source: Battery rechargeable through USB cableStorage method: 512MB flash memory and a 1 GB SD card is includedOperating s...


Best Websites and Preservation Resources: Episode 26
Jul 19 2010 42 mins  
We talk about our list of Family Tree Magazine‘s 101 Best Websites for 2010, and give you links to some of the best preservation resources online. Ep. 26: July 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest and greatest news from Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad brings us up to speed on FamilySearch’s new partnerships with Ancestry and Findmypast. Diane gives us a rundown on recent genealogy news: * We’re Looking for Your Civil War Ancestors* Free Family Tree Magazine Webinar: Ask the Editors Top Tips: 101 Best Websites Contributing editor David Fryxell talks with Lisa about the best free websites for genealogy research from David’s article “Fancy Free” in the September 2010 issue of the magazine. Family Tree University Crash Course Lisa provides answers to some of the most common Google search questions. Get the recording of the Search Engine Tips and Tricks: Google Techniques to Boost Your Research webinar presented by Lisa Louise Cooke. Safe Keeping: Best Preservation Websites Looking for advice on preserving your family heirlooms and papers? These sites are great for family historians: * Library of Congress Preservation* Why Digital Preservation is Important for Everyone* Caring for Your Family Archives* American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC)* Save & Share History articles at Family Tree Magazine

Preserving Your Heirlooms: Episode 25
Jun 07 2010 40 mins  
We celebrate the podcast’s second anniversary with tips for preserving your own legacy and heirlooms. Ep. 25: June 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa chats with Allison about the upcoming Family Tree Pocket Reference book and the second anniversary of the Family Tree Magazine Podcast. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane gives us a rundown on recent genealogy news, highlighting the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ War of 1812 pension records digitization project. Top Tips: Saving Yourself In today’s Top Tips segment, author Sharon DeBartolo Carmack and Lisa talk about some of the things you can do to document your life and become the ancestor you always wished you had from Sharon’s article “Saving Yourself” in the August 2010 issue of the magazine. Best Websites: MyHeritage Lisa talks with Daniel Horowitz of the MyHeritage website, which is in the 10 Stellar Sites for Storing and Sharing section of our 2009 101 Best Websites. Family Tree University Crash Course Lisa shares strategies from the Reverse Genealogy class she’s teaching for Family Tree University. Safe Keeping: Archival Strategy Grace provides tips for preserving items you’ve stashed away in the basement or attic. Read up on specific strategies in the article “Preservation RX” from the December 2009 issue, and download the heirloom inventory form she mentions here. Archival supplies are available from these retailers: * Archival Methods, (866) 877-7050* ArchivaLife Classic set available at Family Tree Shop* Gaylord Brothers, (800) 962-9580* Hollinger Metal Edge, (800) 634-0491* Light Impressions, (800) 828-6216* University Products,

Hanging Out in the Cemetery: Episode 24
May 14 2010 39 mins  
We’re hanging out in the cemetery this month, with advice on doing tombstone rubbings and info on a great cemetery website. Ep. 24: May 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy LisLisa chats with Allison about the upcoming book Grave Humor. You can submit your own photos of funny headstones at the Funny Gravestone Photos group pool on Flickr. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares news from the recent NGS conference held in Salt Lake City. * A Celebration of Family History* Genealogy News Corral April 26-30 * Three New Announcements from Ancestry.com Top Tips: Tombstone Tales Sunny Morton and Lisa discuss the questions we should be asking about cemetery records from Sunny’s article Tombstone Tales in the July 2010 issue of the magazine. Family Tree Magazine Plus members can read the article here. Here are some websites that Sunny recommends: * The Department of Veterans Affairs lists American military cemeteries around the country as well as military cemeteries created by states* American Battle Monuments Commission maintains 24 cemeteries for US soldiers who died in battles overseas Best Websites: Names in Stone Lisa talks with David Day of the Names in Stone website, which is in the 10 Best Places to See Dead People section of the 101 Best Web Sites list from the September 2009 issue. Safe Keeping: Tombstone Rubbings Grace provides safe keeping tips for doing tombstone rubbings. Get more great advice here: * Tombstone Rubbing Step by Step*

Brick Wall Busters Book: Episode 23
Apr 13 2010 35 mins  
Be the first to know about our new book, 101 Brick Wall Busters. Plus, get tips for preserving heirloom quilts. Ep. 23: April 2010 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa chats with Allison about the new book 101 Brick Wall Busters. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane shares some good genealogical news from the Genealogy Insider Blog: * “Who Do You Think You Are?” Gets Second Season* Search 1880 DDD Schedules for 14 States on Ancestry.com* Search Footnote’s Census Records Free Through April 2010 Top Tips: 40 Best Genealogy Blogs In this month’s Top Tips segment, Diane and Lisa discuss genealogy blogs and the article Fab Forty from the May 2010 issue of the magazine. Diane recommends using Google Reader to follow all your favorite blogs. Sign up for free at www.google.com/reader Watch Lisa’s four-part video series How to Blog Your Family History on the Genealogy Gems YouTube channel. Best Websites: Genealogy Gems Allison talks to Lisa about her website, Genealogy Gems, which is in the 10 Top Sites for Cutting-Edge Tools and Tips section of the 2009 101 Best Web Sites list, which appeared in the September 2009 issue. Family Tree University Crash Course Allison provides tips for beginners and tells us about the new “Discover Your Family Tree: Genealogy for the Absolute Beginner” class at Family Tree University. Safe Keeping with Grace Dobush Grace gives advice on preserving your heirloom quilts—new and old. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas,





Our Search for Humorous Tombstones: Episode 19
Dec 23 2009 35 mins  
Learn about our humorous tombstone search, plus Lisa talks with Illya D’Addezio about his website: Live Roots. Ep. 19: December 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest and greatest news from Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad discusses the new Funny Tombstone Photos Flickr group.Add your own funny tombstone photos here. Top Tips: Preservation RX Lisa discusses heirloom preservation with Grace Dobush, associate editor and author of the article “Preservation RX,” which appears in the December 2009 issue of the magazine. Read “Preservation RX” in the December 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: Live Roots Lisa talks with Illya D’Addezio, founder of the Live Roots website. Library Spotlight: Kenton County, Ky., Public Library In this episode we explore the Kenton County, Ky., Public Library with Elaine Kuhn, the Kentucky History Services coordinator. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Name Calling In today’s Best of Family Tree Magazine segment Diane Haddad shares tips for creating family history gifts from her article “Giving Trees” from the December 2006 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Footnote’s New Interactive Census Collection: Episode 18
Nov 01 2009 48 mins  
Diane Haddad gives you the inside scoop on Footnote’s new interactive census collection, which will add 9.5 million documents to the website’s collection. Ep. 18: November 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest and greatest news from Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad discusses Footnote’s new interactive census collection. Top Tips: DNA Fact or Science Fiction Lisa discusses Lauren Gamber’s article “DNA Fact or Science Fiction” from the December 2009 issue of the magazine with Dusty Rhoades, Product Manager at Genetree. Best Websites: GeneTree.com Dusty Rhoades answers common questions about the DNA services provided by GeneTree.com, named one of the 101 best websites for tracing your roots by Family Tree Magazine. Library Spotlight: Wisconsin Historical Society Library In this episode we explore the Wisconsin Historical Society Library with James Hansen, head genealogist. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Clean Sweep In today’s Best of Family Tree Magazine segment, Rick Crume shares tips from his article “Clean Sweep” from the February 2004 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!


Diving Deep in the Library of Congress: Episode 16
Sep 01 2009 42 mins  
In this episode we explore the variety of US collections available at the Library of Congress. Ep. 16: September 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison discuss ways that listeners and readers can get involved with Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad discusses what’s new at Ancestry.com. Top Tips: Express Shipping Contributing Editor Rick Crume provides tips for researching your ancestors online. The article “Express Shipping” can be found in the November 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine. Best Websites: HeritageQuest Online HeritageQuest Online boasts the complete US census, the Periodical Source Index to genealogy publications, 24,000 history books and loads of other goodies for the genealogist. Guest: Bill Forsyth, Director of Product Management at ProQuest. Best of Family Tree Magazine: The Grandparents Trap In today’s Best of Family Tree Magazine segment, Allison Stacy sheds light on some of the common myths in genealogy! She draws from Lauren Gamber’s article “The Grandparents Trap” from the September 2004 special issue of Trace Your Family Tree. Library Spotlight: The Library of Congress In this episode we explore the variety of US collections available at the Library of Congress. Guest: James Sweany, Head of the Local History and Genealogy Room Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Best Websites and a Redesign Sneak Peek: Episode 15
Aug 01 2009 48 mins  
Lisa talks with publisher Allison Stacy about Family Tree Magazine’s 10th anniversary, as well as a sneak peak of the magazine’s redesign. Ep. 15: August 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison chat about Family Tree Magazine’s upcoming 10th anniversary. Allison gives a sneak preview of plans for new content and design in the magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad discusses what’s new at two major genealogy Web sites: Ancestry.com and Footnote. Top Tips: 101 Best Websites Contributing Editor David Fryxell talks about the much anticipated 101 Best Web Sites list for 2009. You’ll find the full list online and in the September 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine, available in our online store. Library Spotlight: Indian River County Library In this episode we explore the variety of US collections available at the Indian River County Library in Vero Beach, Fla., with librarian Pam Cooper.  Best of Family Tree Magazine: Cracking the Tombstone Code There’s more to tombstones than names and dates, and in the Best of Family Tree Magazine segment author Sharon DeBartolo Carmack helps us “crack the tombstone code.” Find Sharon’s article in the June 2005 issue of Family Tree Magazine available in our online store. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Reverse Genealogy: Episode 14
Jul 01 2009 49 mins  
In this episode’s top tips segment, Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Maureen A. Taylor tells us how reversing the rules can deliver some great results. Ep. 14: July 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison catch up on the latest news from Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad gives the scoop on Genealogy Wise, the new social networking Web site from FamilyLink. Plus, learn about the new name for Ancestry.com’s parent company (hint: it’s a no-brainer). FamilyLink Launches “Facebook for Genealogists” FamilyHistoryLink to Shut Down Aug. 15  Top Tips: Reverse Genealogy You’re probably familiar with the basic rule of genealogical research that says to start with yourself and work backward. In this episode’s top tips segment, Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Maureen A. Taylor tells us how reversing that rule can deliver some great results. Maureen’s article “Switching Gears,” which outlines five benefits to reverse genealogy with real-life examples, appears in the July issue. Best Websites: DeadFred Lisa chats with Joe Bott of DeadFred, a site that strives to reunite orphaned old photos with family members of the people pictured. Library Spotlight: The DAR Library The Daughters of the American Revolution library in Washington, DC, is chock-full of resources and records—but did you know it also offers some useful online genealogy tools? Learn how to take advantage of the site in Lisa’s interview with library director Eric Grundset. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Destination Yesterday Ever wished you could walk in your forebears’ footsteps? Lisa talks with Family Tree Magazine contributing Nancy Hendrickson about unique ways to experience the lives of your ancestors, the subject of her article “Destination Yesterday” from the August 2005 issue. Order the August 2005 Issue in digital or print format here. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Where to Find Us this Summer: Episode 13
Jun 01 2009 36 mins  
Allison and Lisa talk about upcoming genealogy events where you can meet Family Tree Magazine staff, network with fellow researchers and take away great ideas for tracing your roots. Ep. 13, June 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison and Lisa talk about upcoming genealogy events where you can meet Family Tree Magazine staff, network with fellow researchers and take away great ideas for tracing your roots. Look for us at the following conferences this summer: * Family History Expo—Loveland, Colo., June 12-13, 2009* Southern California Genealogical Society Jamboree—Burbank, Calif., June 26-28* Family History Expo—Salt Lake City,  Aug. 28-29, 2009* Federation of Genealogical Societies 2009 Conference—Little Rock, Ark., Sept. 2-5, 2009 Plus, we announce the winner of last month’s contest. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad gives the scoop on online options available to family historians for connecting with professional researchers.Read “Where to Find a Genealogist for Hire” Top Tips: Summer Reunions Summer is reunion time, and Family Tree Magazine writer Sunny McClellan Morton has great ideas for gleaning genealogical information at your next get-together. She shares some tips from her article “Reunion Riches” in the July issue. Best Websites: Genline Lisa chats with Kathy Meade of Genline, a leading source of online Swedish records. (Note: Genline’s records are now part of Ancestry.com.) Best of Family Tree Magazine: Heraldry Myths Lisa interviews Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, author of “The Blazon Truth” about the myths and truths surrounding heraldry, from the May 2006 special issue Trace Your Family History. Sharon is a certified genealogist and partner in the research firm of Warren, Carmack and Associates. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas,...


Searching Census Records: Episode 12
May 01 2009
In this episode we get some tips from the experts on using census records to discover your ancestors. Ep. 12: May 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy To kick off this census-themed episode, Lisa and Allison talk about Family Tree Magazine‘s upcoming webinar Online Census Secrets: Best Web Sites & Strategies to Find Your Ancestors—one of a new series of Family Tree Magazine online workshops. Plus, a contest to win a free genealogy class from GenClass. Listen to the episode for details, then submit your entry via e-mail by May 30. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad joins Lisa from the National Genealogical Society conference in Raleigh, NC, where she reports on breaking news out of this annual genealogy community gathering.   Visit the Genealogy Insider blog for more details and updates from the conference. Top Tips: Census Clues The US census is more than those every-10-years head counts—several types of “special censuses” may also hold ancestor answers. In our Top Tips segment, Curt Witcher, department manager for the Historical Genealogy Department of the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, IN talks about the content of these records and where to use them. Read our complete guide to nine types of special censuses in the July 2009 issue of Family Tree Magazine.    Best Websites: Footnote Lisa chats with Footnote‘s Justin Schroepfer about what’s new on the historical records subscription site, including a way to memorialize relatives on Facebook. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Searching Censuses Online In our last census-related segment, Family Tree Magazine contributing editor David A. Fryxell shares some of his tips for searching censuses online, from his articles in the April 2005 issue and the May 2007 issue. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Hidden Clues in Old Hairstyles: Episode 11
Apr 01 2009 37 mins  
Photo Detective Maureen A. Taylor talks with host Lisa Louise Cooke about historical hairstyles and what they can tell us about our ancestors. Ep. 11: April 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison discuss ways that listeners and readers can get involved with Family Tree Magazine. Lisa and Allison talk about tracing roots “across the pond” and the magazine’s newest CD, the Family Tree Passport to Europe. In this segment, you’ll learn more about the how-to advice on this CD—and our contest for a chance to win a copy! Listen to the episode for details, then submit your entry via e-mail by April 30. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad gives you the scoop on new records coming online.   Visit the Genealogy Insider blog for more details and updates on the databases Diane describes. Top Tips: Clues in Old Hairstyles You’ve probably inspected your old family photographs for genealogy information, but have you ever paid attention to the hairstyles of the people pictured? Contributing editor Maureen A. Taylor describes some of the photo-dating and social history clues you can glean from your ancestors’ coiffures. Her visual guide to hairstyle history from 1840 to 1930 appears in the May 2009 Family Tree Magazine. Watch Maureen’s video of historical hairdos submitted by readers Best Websites: Findmypast Lisa chats with Debra Chatfield, marketing manager of UK-focused records site FindMyPast, about the site’s content and resources. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Economic History Now that you’ve turned in your taxes, consider what your ancestors’ tax and financial records can tell you about your genealogy. Lisa catches up with Jim Beidler, author of the April 2006 article “Financial Aid,” to discuss how economic history helped shape our ancestors’ lives. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

RootsMagic Updates and Research-Friendly States: Episode 10
Mar 01 2009 42 mins  
We review the best and worst states for genealogy research, plus a look at the Family History Library, World Vital Records and Irish roots. Ep. 10: March 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison talk about Family Tree Magazine’s free, weekly e-newsletter and the free e-book you can get right now when you sign up: Best of the Photo Detective, a 42-page compilation of Family Tree Magazine contributing editor and blogger Maureen A. Taylor’s articles and columns on how to identify who’s in mysterious old photos and when they were taken. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad talks about the new features in RootsMagic 4, a new version of the software that just opened up for a free public beta test. Top Tips with David A, Fryxell As you probably know if you’ve done much US genealogy, not all states are created equal when it come to genealogical documents, resources and access. Contributing editor David A. Fryxell discusses which are the best and the worst for genealogy research, the topic of his article “States of Mind” in the May 2009 issue. Listen as David divulges the most genealogically friendly state on this month’s show. Library Spotlight: FHL and FamilySearch Don Anderson, director of the Family History Library and FamilySearch Support, discusses the world largest genealogy library’s vast collection. Links to learn more: * Family History Library Catalog* Listen to Family History: Genealogy Made Easy Episode 16 for an in-depth look at The Family History Library and more conversation with Don Anderson.* And tune in to Episode 17, 18 & 19 for a three part series on everything you wanted to know about using the library and the Family History Centers around the world. Best Websites: World Vital Records Lisa interviews Steve Nickle, President and Chief Operating Officer of FamilyLink, about the collections and databases on World Vital Records. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Irish Blessings Lisa chats with the Sharon DeBartolo Carmack about Irish genealogy research and tips from her article “Irish Blessings” from the March 2008 issue. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

Web Guides and Memory Makers: Episode 9
Feb 01 2009 44 mins  
We share new record releases and money-saving research tips, plus advice for creating, sharing and preserving family photos. Ep. 9, February 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Get a sneak peek at the magazine’s new series of collectible pullouts, called Web Guides. The first article covers Ancestry.com—which managing editor Diane Haddad recently visited and reported on in a blog series: Wrapping Up Our Look Inside Ancestry.com News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider and managing editor Diane Haddad gives some inside scoop on the new television show coming to the United States called “Who Do You Think You Are?” Plus: a review of some of the new genealogical records from around the world that have been released in early 2009.   Blog articles mentioned in this episode: * Who Do You Think You Are Moves Again* 101 Best Websites: African-American Roots* New FamilySearch Records Span the Globe* More African American Roots Coming to Footnote Top Tips: Research on a Shoestring Contributing editor Maureen Taylor shares some of her tips for planning research trips on a shoestring budget from her March 2009 article. Links Mentioned: * www.aaa.com* www.farecast.com* www.kayak.com* www.travelzoo.com* www.priceline.com Best Websites: Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative Lisa interviews John Dougan, State Archivist at the Missouri State Archives in Jefferson City, about the Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative. Library Spotlight Patricia M. Van Skaik, Manager of the History and Genealogy Department at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County in Ohio, discusses the library’s vast genealogical collection. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Memory Makers Lisa chats with Allison Stacy and Beth Williams, executive editor of Memory Makers magazine, about the Family Photo Essentials CD, a joint project of both magazines, and how it can help you create, share and save your family photos. A sister publication of Family Tree Magazine,

Setting Your Genealogy Goals for the New Year: Episode 8
Jan 01 2009 33 mins  
Learn secrets for searching online library catalogs, historical newspapers on GenealogyBank, and great ideas for tracing your roots in the new year. Ep. 8: January 2009 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Lisa and Allison go behind the scenes of the History Matters column on innovations and trends that shaped your ancestors’ lives. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Diane announces the winner of the Free DNA Test from GeneTree: Congratulations to Kenna Luck! Top Tips: Make the Most of Library Catalogs Contributing editor Rick Crume shares some of his tips for getting the most out of library catalogs from his March 2009 article “Catalog Shopping.” Best Websites: GenealogyBank Lisa interviews Tom Kemp, Director of Genealogy Products at GenealogyBank about the resources available on this subscription Web site, including a collection of historical newspapers and the US Serial Set. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Goals for the New Year Author and genealogy instructor Lisa Alzo shares some of her favorite tips from her article “365 Ideas For Tracing Your Family Tree In The New Year” from the February 2006 issue of the magazine. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

2008 Year in Review: Episode 7
Dec 01 2008 35 mins  
Highlights from this episode include genealogy gifts, top tips for making the most of Google, hints for interviewing relatives over the holidays and more. Ep. 7, December 2008 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy Allison looks at the year in review at Family Tree Magazine: * Family Tree Kids!* Family Tree Magazine Videos* Subscribe for free to the Family Tree Magazine Podcast in iTunes News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Lisa and Diane chat about her recent blog articles on: * Footnote Releases Web’s Biggest WWII Collection* What Your Favorite Genealogist Really Wants From Santa GeneTree DNA test Giveaway DrawingSend an e-mail stating your favorite segment of the Family Tree Magazine Podcast for a chance to win a DNA test from GeneTree.Deadline: Dec. 22, 2008 Top Tips: Your Guide to Google Lisa and Allison talk about how to make the most of Google, with highlights from Allison’s article “Your Guide to Google”  in the January 2009 issue. * Google cheat sheet* Six tips from the new book Google Your Family Tree by Daniel M. Lynch (FamilyLink) Best Websites: GeneTree Lisa chats with Matt Cupal, president and chief operating officer of GeneTree, where you can discover your family through DNA, and connect with others to share and preserve family history. Best of Family Tree Magazine Sunny McClellan Morton talks with Lisa about her article “Get ‘Em Talking” from the March 2008 issue of Family Tree Magazine.  Sunny discusses five great techniques for getting reluctant relatives to open up. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!







Recharging Your Research: Episode 1
Jun 01 2008 33 mins  
Welcome to the premiere episode of the Family Tree Magazine podcast! We’re sharing our best tips, resources and more. Ep. 1: May/June 2008 Back to the episode list In this episode: The Editor’s Desk with Allison Stacy In the premiere episode, Lisa and Allison discuss the virtues of podcasting and what we can look forward to in upcoming episodes, as well as catch up on the latest from Family Tree Magazine. News from the Blogosphere with Diane Haddad Genealogy Insider Diane Haddad brings us the latest news from the blogosphere, including her recent TV appearances and Family Tree Magazine’s recent partnership with Tamagotchi. Top Tips: Making Your Own Luck Lisa talks with Maureen Taylor about how to make some of our own luck in finding distant relatives. Maureen Taylor is the author of Family Tree Magazine’s Photo Detective blog. Best Websites: WorldCat This month’s featured website is WorldCat, which you can explore at Worldcat.org. Best of Family Tree Magazine: Breaking Through Brick Walls Sharon DeBartolo Carmack, professional genealogist and Family Tree Magazine contributing editor, discusses strategies for recharging your research and breaking through stubborn brick walls. Your Host: Lisa Louise Cooke Listen to Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems and Genealogy: Family History Made Easy podcasts in iTunes and visit her website for great research ideas, podcast episodes and videos. Have fun climbing your family tree!

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