Black History in Two Minutes

Oct 16 2020 2 mins 180

Brief and concise historical episodes of the African-American experience. Narrated by renowned historian, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and executive produced by Robert F. Smith.





Protesting the Birth of a Nation
Oct 16 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) In 1915, D.W. Griffith, released a film that would go down as one of the most disturbing representations of black Americans ever, The Birth of a Nation. Released post-Civil War and Reconstruction Era, the film played on stereotypes abroad. Griffith ignited a racist agenda and amplified the thoughts many white Americans had about free black people. Using white actors in blackface, the film was full of racist propaganda that proposed the idea that free black people were too lazy and ignorant to fully master American citizenship. But even in times of darkness, light always finds its way in. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) led an initiative to protest the three-hour film. While efforts were not successful, the NAACP would see increased membership and become the staple it is in the black community today. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from Vincent Brown and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham of Harvard University, and Imani Perry from Princeton University — we look at a piece of propaganda that aimed to tear down black people. But instead, it unified them in ways still seen today. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images Additional Archival by: • Harrisburg Telegraph Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


The Beginning of Black History: Juan Garrido
Oct 09 2020 1 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) In the early 1500s, a West African man named Juan Garrido joined the ranks of Spanish explorers who ventured out in hopes of discovering new parts of the world. With their sights set on locating the fountain of youth, Garrido and other travelers landed in what we now call Florida in 1513. While history books would have us to believe the first black people in America were slaves, Garrido’s existence and freedom to explore contradicts those sentiments. He is now etched in the nation’s history as the first black man to step foot on American soil. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, we will take a closer look at an African pioneer whose international exploration earned him a very special place in American history. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images Additional Archival by: • Acción Cultural Española (AC/E) Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai



Jackie Robinson Integrates Baseball
Oct 02 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) During a time when the game of baseball lacked diversity, America’s beloved sport was on the brink of a major change when black sport’s journalist protested the league’s failure to integrate. In response, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ owner, Branch Rickey, stepped up and decided to scout a black player from the Negro League. On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson tore down the color barrier and became the first black baseball player to play in the Major League arena. His talent, education, and ability to withstand racial issues that were sure to come, made him the ideal candidate. Despite a host of naysayers, Jackie would lead the Brooklyn Dodgers to their only World Series and was named Rookie of the Year. His legacy remains In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, we celebrate an icon that broke barriers on and off the field. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Shutterstock • U.S. Army Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Soul Train
Sep 25 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Taking cues from American Bandstand, Soul Train became a black cultural phenomena. Created and hosted by Don Cornelius, a Chicago radio reporter and DJ, the show was launched in 1970, but only in Chicago. However, the program became an overnight success story as it quickly swept the nation. From the musical guests to the popular songs playing, Soul Train brought black popular culture to the mainstream in a revolutionary way. But it wasn’t just the artists who were on display. The show’s dancers became cultural icons, too, as viewers attempted to emulate all of their flashy and artistic dance moves. In this series of Black History in Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University and musician Questlove, we’ll take a look at one of the longest-running programs in the history of American television. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Shutterstock Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films • Kunhardt • WNET Additional Archival by: • The Atlanta Constitution • Viacom • Don Cornelius Productions Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Additional Music: • Up on Soul Train performed by The Whispers Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Hank Aaron: Breaking the Home Run Record
Sep 18 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Born Henry Louis Aaron, baseball legend Hank Aaron swung his way into the history books in 1974. While the Atlanta Braves enjoyed the benefits of having the talented athlete on their team, actions off the field forced the conversation to transition from celebratory to cautionary. As Aaron’s star rose, so did racial tension. With displeasure coming in the form of hate mail and even death threats, he feared for his own safety as he pursued the home run record set by American baseball hero Babe Ruth. But on April 8, 1974, he hit his 715th home run and found himself as the all-time home run record holder for more than thirty years. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Michael Eric Dyson of Princeton University, we will take a look at how this baseball legend rose from the Negro League to the Major League and earned a top spot in American history. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Associated Press • FILM Archives, Inc. • Getty Images • Shutterstock Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Civil War and Emancipation
Sep 11 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) In 1861, the south’s threats of seceding the union led to the start of the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln’s primary goal was to minimize secession talks. But, as black slaves who were forced to fight for the confederacy escaped to union territory, a shift occurred that worked in the favor of the president. Slave owners in the south found themselves at a disadvantage during the war as their day-to-day operations were disrupted. President Lincoln capitalized on this new strain and created the Emancipation Proclamation. Even though the war wasn’t about slavery, the strategic move to formally end slavery, led the union to victory. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Kimberle Crenshaw of UCLA and Columbia Law Schools, and Vincent Brown of Harvard University, we will take a look at how nearly 200,000 black men saved the nation and changed the outcome of the Civil War. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Everett Collection Inc. • Library of congress Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Fort Mose: The First All-Black Settlement in the U.S.
Sep 04 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) As European countries battled to claim territories in America, the Spanish state — which is now known as Florida — became a haven for slaves who ran away from the British colonies. In 1738, a group of these escaped slaves created the first black town, called Fort Mose. Word spread quickly about the new town, and slaves just north of them created a plan to revolt and make their way to join the freed settlement. A year later, the Stono Rebellion would lead to nearly 100 slaves battling local militia all in the name of freedom. Although While British colonial forces would seize Florida and For Mose would no longer exist, the settlement will always be remembered as the first black town in American history. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, we will take a look at the slaves who risked it all on a quest to attain the freedom they deserved. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Historical Archaeology Program at the Florida Museum of Natural History • Shutterstock Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films • Kunhardt • WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Land: Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule
Jun 19 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) As the Union declared victory over the Confederacy, post-Civil War life seemed to be off to a good start for freed slaves. William Tecumseh Sherman, a former Union general, sat with 20 black ministers to develop a plan to remedy the harsh treatment of black people. The phrase “40 acres and a mule” — a promise to former slaves — would be hatched from this meeting. Unfortunately, President Andrew Johnson would renege on this promise and many families never saw this promise come to fruition. While land ownership would have been a step in the right direction, negotiations robbed black families of an opportunity to invest in an economic future with. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University and Farah Griffin of Columbia University, we uncover the turbulent history of land ownership and the challenges black people faced in America. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Image • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


The Red Summer
Jun 18 2020 5 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) The events unfolding across the United States today in the wake of the brutal murder of George Floyd, are an eerie repetition of events that marred the history of race relations in this country almost exactly a century ago. The year was 1919, and African American soldiers who came home from the Great War in Europe with hopes that serving their country at last would entitle them to the rights of equal citizenship, found themselves on the lethal end of an outbreak of racial violence so horrific that the civil rights leader James Weldon Johnson called it The Red Summer. In this episode of Black History in Two Minutes (or so) hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from David Levering Lewis of New York University, Peniel Joseph of the University of Texas and Farah Griffin of Columbia University — we explore some of the underlying factors that ignited one of the most violent race riots in our country’s history. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ • Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Arkansas State Archives • Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System • Everett Collection, Inc • Getty Images • Library of Congress • National Archives and Records Administration • New York Public Library • Solomon Sir Jones Films. Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library • University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, Longview Public Library Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Chinisha Scott Music By: • Oovra Music Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor. Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Lynching
Jun 12 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Lynching was an action used to terrorize the black community for generations, with the first known public display of this injustice taking place in Madison, Mississippi in 1835. Investigative journalist like Ida B. Wells stood on the front lines, documenting and reporting the continued use of lynchings in society. Wells’ objective was to counter the belief that lynching was a valid means of justice. Eventually, the NAACP made it a part of its mission to see to it that lynching was put to an end. In 2018, after more than two hundred failed attempts, the United States Congress finally passed a bill making the act of lynching a hate crime. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from Farah Griffin of Columbia University and Bryan Stevenson, the Executive Director of Equal Justice Initiative — we take a deeper look at the long journey of a violent and public spectacle that was used to taunt and terrorize black communities for centuries. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Associated Press • C-SPAN • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress • Shutterstock Additional Archival by: • Jet Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai



John Lewis: The Fight for the Right to Vote
Jun 05 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) In 1963, John Lewis’ excitement would meet his life’s purpose when he joined the Civil Rights Movement. He is now known as one of the greatest activists and change fighters to enter the arena of social and racial justice reform. Lewis became one of the “Big Six” leaders of the Civil Rights movement and helped organized demonstrations and sit-ins, all while playing an active role in the March on Washington. His efforts would reach new heights after the march in Selma, Alabama lead to President Lyndon B. Johnson passing the Voting Rights Act in 1965. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Khalil Muhammad of Harvard University, Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, and Civil Rights Activist Vernon Jordan, we salute a freedom fighter whose message and activism can still be heard loud and clear to this day. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images • LBJ Presidential Library • National Archives and Records Administration • Shutterstock Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


The Black Press: From Freedom’s Journal to The Crisis, Ebony & Jet
May 29 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) White publications have sought to represent all voices in America since it’s discovery. But, in 1827, Samuel Cornish and John Russwurm joined forces and created the Freedom’s Journal. This publication created a space for black journalists to speak on issues relevant to black people. From there, we would see other noted publications, like The Colored American, enter the homes of black people across the country. The black press not only spoke on topics like racial injustice and protests, but it delivered news so powerful that it would be tied to the launch of the Civil Rights Movement. As the press grew in distribution, black issues became highlighted and black accomplishments were able to be celebrated nationwide. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So, hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Farah Griffin of Columbia University, Mia Bay of the University of Pennsylvania, and Paula Giddings of Smith College, we will take a look at how the black press became a pivotal part of the black experience in America. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • The Brooklyn Daily Eagle • The Evening Sun • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress • The New York Public Library • The New York Times • The Tribune Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


First African American Patent Holders
May 22 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Black inventors have made significant contributions in the name of not only advancing the American brand, but by way of breaking down a system that didn’t always allow for their innovative brands to exist. After slavery was abolished, requests for patents rose, and black inventors were able to capitalize off their talents. From folding beds to traffic lights, African-Americans have had a long tradition of improving daily life for everyone. Thomas Jennings and Judy Reed would become the first African-American man and woman to be granted patents for their inventions. In this series of Black History In Two Minutes or So, hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University, let’s take a look at black patent pioneers who laid the foundation for other talented creators. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Library of Congress • Queens Borough Public Library • United States Patent and Trademark Office Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai






Jack Johnson: Winner of the 1910's " Fight of the Century"
May 15 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Jack Johnson entered the world ready to fight in the most non-conventional way. As the son of slaves, he worked many unskilled jobs, before transitioning into his career as a boxer. He would later transcend the sport and shake up society in a way people had never seen a black man do before. When Jim Crow spreading through America in 1908, Jack Johnson took down white boxer Tommy Burns for the heavyweight title of the world. Riding the wave of his success, he then faced off against Jim Jeffries — whom was dubbed “The Great White Hope” — in an iconic and historical boxing match. In this series of Black History in Two Minutes or So, host Henry Louis Gates Jr. and commentator Imani Perry take a deeper look into the world heavyweight champion and one of the most brash disruptors in African-American history. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ • Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Getty Images• • Library of Congress • Queens Borough Public Library • United States Patent and Trademark Office Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Black Explorers
May 08 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) While history celebrates the explorations of many white voyagers, there are multiple black people who successfully explored sea, land, and space, and in many instances, are often overlooked. Spanish conquistadors brought an enslaved African by the name of Esteban on a failed trip to the US mainland. Matthew Henson, linked with a renowned Admiral, was able to go all the way to the North Pole. Guion Bluford, Ronald McNair, and Mae Jemison, were accomplished scientists and engineers who were enlisted in the astronaut corps. These black pioneers have been fortunate enough to enter spaces many thought that black people were not able occupy. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr.— with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University, let’s look at some of our unsung explorers have left their mark all over the world as we know it. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ • Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Library of Congress • Queens Borough Public Library • United States Patent and Trademark Office Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai







19th Century Black Discoveries
May 01 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Black innovators and creators have a long history of studying the framework and exploring new ways of advancing modern technology. Take Lewis Latimer and Sarah Boone, for example. They are two inventors who mastered their craft and elevated their industry. Latimer, the son of escaped slaves, became a self-taught mechanical drawer. His relationship with Thomas Edison allowed him to extend the life of the light bulb. While Boone, a dressmaker, recognized the challenges in ironing women’s garments and sought out a functional solution. This foresight allowed both Boone and Latimer to utilize their everyday skillset and bring about greater functionality and extended use of products in their field. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University, we celebrate two black innovators who made major discoveries that we enjoy to this day. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Library of Congress • Queens Borough Public Library • United States Patent and Trademark Office Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


The Black Church
Apr 24 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Religion as we know it infiltrated the black community during slavery. While the objective leaned on pacifying slaves, black people rose against the negative narrative and invested in a community that would be known as the black church. Records indicate that as early as 1794, Richard Allen, a formerly enslaved black man, founded his own denomination and church. Reverend Allen, a man who purchased his own freedom, sought to abolish slavery and help other people escape, as well. As the nation continued to work through the Civil War, Jim Crow, racism, and economic disparity, the black church and its leaders mobilized its followers to speak out and stand up for injustices. In this series of Black History in Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Brittney Cooper of Rutgers University and Peniel Joseph of the University of Texas, we look at a fundamentally important piece of American history that has been a haven for blacks who have often times been isolated by the nation and the rules of the land. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of:Associated Press • Alamy Images • Danny Lyon/Magnum Photos • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress • National Archives and Records Administration • The New York Public Library Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


African American Higher Education
Apr 17 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Opportunities for freed black children to further their educational journey after high school were limited. As a direct response to minimal options, black people began to seek multiple opportunities on their own in the name of higher education. John Chavis, of North Carolina, is noted as the first African-American college student. Mary Jane Patterson is the first black woman to earn a bachelor’s degree. While these students made notable steps towards aiding in access for black people nationwide, it would be the continued discrimination that led to the opening of black colleges like Wilberforce, Lincoln, and Cheyney University. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Brittney Cooper of Rutgers University, we explore the journey of African Americans whose quest for more knowledge led to a string of institutions that are still prominent today. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Abolition in the North | Elizabeth Freeman Sues for Freedom
Apr 10 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Many people recognize the passage of the 13th Amendment as an end to slavery in the south. However, slavery was commonplace in all 13 colonies. Mum Bett, the slave of a Massachusetts judge, learned about the 1780 Massachusetts Constitution. After overhearing a crucial piece of the document, she decided to take matters into her own hands. As she understood it, the phrase “all men are born free and equal” applied to her as a black person. Mum went to an attorney, Theodore Sedgwick, and together, they added another enslaved male named Brom to their team. In the end, the dynamic trio would successfully sue for both Mum and Brom’s freedom. This precedent led to many other black slaves successful suing for their freedom in other northern states. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Brittney Cooper of Rutgers University, we track the journey of Mum Bett, a freedom fighter whose insight and knowledge launched the abolitionist movement. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Getty Images • Library of Congress • Shutterstock Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Frederick Douglass | The Most Photographed American of the 19th Century
Apr 03 2020 2 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Born into slavery as Frederick Douglass in 1818, this renowned lecturer and author would become one of the greatest public speakers of his time. After escaping slavery in 1838, Douglass joined the abolitionist movement. As a paid traveling lecturer, people everywhere laid their eyes on a freed, well-spoken black man. Douglass was a visionary well before his time. Ensuring his photo was taken everywhere he went, he hoped to utilize his imagery to humanize black people — enslaved and free — at home and abroad. He is now known as the most-photographed person of the 19th Century. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr. — with additional commentary from Deborah Willis of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, John Stauffer Harvard University, Rhae Lynn Barnes of Princeton University, and David Blight of Yale University — we celebrate the legacy of Frederick Douglass who advocated for freedom and equality until his passing in 1895. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Alamy Images • Everett Collection, Inc. • Getty Images • Library of Congress Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Katherine Johnson
Mar 27 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Katherine Johnson is a powerhouse unlike any other. Entering college at the tender age of 15, Johnson’s advanced mathematical skill-set forced her environment to make room for her. She broke racial and gender barriers by integrating West Virginia University’s graduate program, and she didn’t just stop there. Her irrefutable intelligence gained her access to NASA, where she would lay the foundation for the Freedom 7 mission, amongst other notable explorations.Her undeniable genius whose brilliance left a major mark on the space program of the 20th century. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Evelynn Hammonds of Harvard University and Farah Griffin of Columbia University, we celebrate a woman who challenged the system, all the while paving the way for African-American women to advance their careers in the scientific community. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Associated Press • Katherine Johnson Photographs provided by Calyx Management Advisors LLC • National Aeronautics and Space Administration • The Obama White House Additional Archival by: • NBC Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai


Henrietta Lacks: The Woman with the Immortal Cells
Mar 20 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) In February 1951, a young African-American woman by the name of Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cervical cancer. Unbeknownst to her, cells from her specific cancer were extracted and sent to a lab to be studied. These cells would be given the name He La and would lead to major advancements in medical research. While the cells helped push the scientific field forward, they were unethically obtained and used. The blatant disregard for Lack’s consent echoes a long history of disregard for black bodies in the medical and scientific field. In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, we explore how the morally questionable obtaining of Henrietta Lack’s cells led to medical advancements we still receive benefits from today. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Getty Images • National Archives and Records Administration • Shutterstock Additional Archival by: • Rolling Stone Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai



Ella Baker - 'The Mother of the Civil Rights Movement'
Mar 13 2020 3 mins  
Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so) After graduating from Shaw University, Ella Baker moved to New York City and began her career as a grassroots organizer. Joining the NAACP in 1940, the Virginia native assisted in developing some of the brightest minds in the Civil Rights Movement. Baker charged people like Rosa Parks to stand up and speak out. Through her organizing efforts, she assisted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which was helping to build the Civil Rights Movement. After a string of sit-ins in the 1960s, she joined a group of students who would go on to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. Baker ignited the fight in a generation of young Americans who would go on to risk their own freedom for the advancement and equality of all black people. Hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr.— with additional commentary from Farrah Griffin of Columbia University, Diane Nash, and Rep. John Lewis — we sing the highest praises to the Mother of the Civil Rights Movement. This freedom fighter’s tireless commitment to liberty paved the way for the freedoms we have today. Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series. If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/ • Archival Materials Courtesy of: • Alamy Images • Associated Press • Getty Images • The NAACP Additional Footage Courtesy of: • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET Additional Archival by: • The Times and Democrat Executive Producers: • Robert F. Smith • Henry Louis Gates Jr. • Dyllan McGee • Deon Taylor Produced by: • William Ventura • Romilla Karnick Music By: • Oovra Music Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts. Distributed by aone.la Powered by hyperengine.ai





























































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