my mechanics

Oct 07 2020 19 mins 1

Hello and welcome to my channel. I'm uploading videos all about mechanical stuff, new creations and also restorations. I love to work with metal and I pay a lot of attention to the details of my projects. If you have something to restore for me you can send me pictures of the item on Instagram or e-mail. I only restore your items if you don't want them back. I don't do comissions. [email protected] Check out my second channel "my mechanics insights" Subscribe for more and stay tuned. Thanks for all your support, I really do appreciate it :-)





1930s Rusty Metal Shear - Perfect Restoration
Jan 19 2019 28 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a Beverly Shear model B1 My friend found this Beverly Shear in the steel waste at the recycling station. When I first saw this Beverly Shear I had no idea why it has such an unique shape. After a bit of research I quickly found out that this is a very well known tool. So I decided to restore it and bought it for $30. The Beverly Shear is a tool to cut sheet, because of it's unique shape it enables you to cut curved shapes and that's what makes the Beverly Shear so special. The Beverly Shear was invented by Kurt Nebel in 1931 in Chicago. There are 3 different sizes available: model B1, model B2 and model B3 which is the biggest one. They have made some changes over the years, but since 1947 the shears have remained virtually unchainged. For the colour i decided to use a darker grey than the original and choosed anthracide, I also added two washers. To make the parts black I used a bluing liquid called „Birchwood Casey - Super Blue“ and it worked very well. It's easy to hanlde and the big advantage over heating and quenching in oil is that you can do it without heating the parts up. So you won't change the structure of the steel and you can use it on hardened parts as well. Because I have no tools and experience in sharpening such blades, I decided to ask my friend Philipp Elsener from Elsener Messerschmied to do it. He's a professional knifemaker here in Rapperswil Switzerland. Check out his website, linked below. Overall I'm very happy how the Beverly Shear came out and as it is such a unique tool I'll keep it for myself. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora Stephan Becker SA Graver Joel Miller Joan Casanovas afreeflyingsoul acemaclace Allan Mckenzie Clément BERNARD Dawson Mertz Jake Julie Smith Lucy Lole Pascal Bertossa Sheepless Ian Hutchinson Moeparker Sasan Hezerkhani XxJonathXx Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:38 testing 00:57 disassembling 03:45 showing all the parts 03:58 washing the parts 04:21 removing paint with paint stripper 04:50 protecting the parts from rusting with Motorex MX50 oil spray 05:02 restoring the main part 06:49 restoring the front plate 08:18 restoring the back plate 09:09 restoring the two big bolts 09:50 restoring the nut 10:24 restoring the special washer 10:42 restoring the blade holding plate 11:21 making a new screw for the blade holding plate 12:32 polishing the new washer 12:44 assembling test 13:24 restoring and sharpening the blades 14:36 restoring the handle holder 15:39 restoring the handle and making a sleeve for it 17:54 restoring the screw for the handle 18:20 making a special washer on the lathe 19:18 restoring the sign 19:44 showing the two new rivets for the sign 19:52 restoring the small screws 20:15 making the parts black with Birchwood Casey - Super Blue 21:04 masking the parts with aluminium tape for sandblasting 21:46 sandblasting 22:51 filling the holes with 2K filler 23:18 masking the parts for painting 23:27 applying 2K primer 23:36 applying 2K anthracide coat 24:07 showing all the parts before reassembling 24:23 reassembling 26:29 adjusting the blade distance 26:40 showing the finished product 27:36 final testing 27:57 cut comparison before/after Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 3 weeks and I can't really tell how many hours I spent. $30 Beverly Shear $20 primer (2K) $20 anthracide coat (2K) My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: ht


Antique Blowtorch Restoration - with testing!
Sep 26 2018 18 mins  
Antique Swiss Blowtorch Restoration - with testing! Oerlikon Record In this video i'm restoring an antique swiss blowtorch. Like, comment, subscribe. I found this old blowtorch, which was perfect for a nice restoration video. Before i started to disassemble i wanted to know if it still works and it did. The flame was quiet inconsistant and fire leaked everywhere. By the first look i saw that the front piece was damaged very hard, the bolt on top had a lot of slack, the handle of the pump was broken and it didn't lock. After this first look i started to disassemble. All the parts were really easy to remove and it went very well and fast. To remove the soot and patina i used a mixture of flour, salz and vinegar. This is a very effective and cheap method, it takes a bit of time but it's worth to wait. I left the parts for 7 days. I made a new bolt on the lathe and recut the thread. To make the bolt black i heated it up to around 300-400°C and layed it in olive oil after it, that makes it also rust proofing. Because i couldn't fix the front piece, i decided to make a new one and it worked very well. I made the gasket for it out of an exhaust gasket, because it had one layer aluminium in it i first made a hole on the mill, then cut it roughly out and finished it with the belt grinder. Next up i removed all the scratches from the tank with sandpaper. As i can't engrave i decided to scratch the letters deeper with a needle and then i polished it. I did the same with the same with the filler cap and made a new gasket out of cork for it. The shaft from the pump was bent very hard, so i did straighten it with a hammer and polished it. As the handle from the pump was broken and it didn't lock, i decided to make a new one. I designed the handle and i was inspired by pictures of simular blowtorches on the internet, i was quiet happy with the endresult. To make a new leather for the pump, i soacked a piece of leather in pure gasoline. I made a die and stamp to bring the leather in shape. To dry it faster i set it on fire and waited until the flames stoped, held it quick under water and left it for 24 hours to dry. I took it out of the die, cut it in shape with scissors and puched a hole in it. I grinded the black handle clean with sandpaper on the lathe and made a new profile on the mill, after that i polished it to make it black and shiny. I made a new wick with a cotton cord. Then i put it all back together. I used just a little bit grease on all the threads and also on the pump leather. The pump had a very good compression after assembling and i was very happy about the overall looking at the end. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/



Forgotten Rusty Oil Lamp - Restoration
Dec 23 2018 20 mins  
Forgotten Rusty Construction Oil Lamp - Restoration In this video i'm restoring an old oil lamp made by Locher. Like, comment, subscribe. My friend found this oil lamp in the steel waste at the recycling station. This one was owned by a big swiss construction company called WALO, it was used as a signal light at construction sites. These oil lamps made by Locher were very common in switzerland for railroads as well. I really liked the look of this lamp, specially the combination of red and white. As I'm still a complete beginner when it comes to painting and working with sheet, I decided to challenge myself and restore this beautiful oil lamp. I learned a lot of new stuff, specially about the painting. The result came out quite nice and I'm happy with it. I hope you like my work and the video. Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:53 disassembling 02:16 showing all the parts 02:28 washing the parts 03:00 pre test 03:09 measure the temperature of the lamp 03:28 removing the paint with paint stripper 04:49 bringing the sheets back in shape 05:58 removing the dents on the top part 06:41 sandblasting 07:31 using filler on the door 07:49 apply heat resistant paint 08:18 apply primer 08:29 apply white coat 09:15 apply red coat 10:22 restoring the glass 10:41 making new gaskets for the glass 11:29 restoring theclips 12:13 restoring the small steel shaft for the door 12:36 restoring the lock 13:01 making a new square shaft for the lock 14:15 restoring the new key for the lock 14:40 restoring the oil container 15:28 restoring the burner 16:32 replacing the wick 16:41 showing all the parts before reassembling 17:04 reassembling 18:38 showing the finished product 19:25 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I spent around 30 hours on this project $3 new wick $20 new gaskets $9 lamp oil $20 heat resistant paint $20 primer (2K) $20 white coat (2K) $20 red coat (2K) Timestamps of used tools and machines: 01:57 300g hammer and 3mm punch 01:59 pliers 02:01 bench vice with soft jaws 02:38 parts washer with parts cleaner liquid, google it ;-) 02:57 lamp oil 03:00 lighter 03:09 laser temperature gauge 03:28 paint stripper 03:33 nylon brush 03:45 scraper 04:00 nylon brush for kitchen 04:34 universal spray (Motorex Intact MX50) 04:59 300g hammer and piece of aluminium 05:16 air die grinder wit sanding bit 05:25 angle grinder 05:28 300g hammer and 3mm punch 05:44 300g hammer and piece of aluminium 05:54 air die grinder wit sanding bit 06:41 sandblaster 07:35 two component filler 07:39 sandpaper for metal (grid 120, 240) 07:49 heat resistant paint matt black 08:11 masking tape 08:18 two component primer 08:29 two component white paint 08:49 masking tape 09:15 two component red paint 09:42 scalpel 10:28 cotton buffing wheel 10:51 scalpel 11:33 steel wire brush 11:37 steel wire brush 11:46 pliers 11:53 300g hammer 12:01 cotton buffing wheel 12:17 300g hammer 12:23 sandpaper for metal (grid 120, 240, 400) 12:28 cotton buffing wheel 12:40 steel wire brush 12:46 sandpaper for metal (grid 120, 240, 400) 12:51 cotton buffing wheel 13:01 lathe Weiler 13:17 milling machine Aciera F3, carbide endmill 10mm 13:43 lathe Weiler 13:55 belt grinder (grid 60) 14:00 sandpaper for metal (grid 120, 240, 400) 14:09 cotton buffing wheel 14:21 cotton buffing wheel 14:29 cord drill with steel wire brush 14:44 sandpaper for metal (grid 240, 400) 14:49 steel wire brush 14:56 cotton buffing wheel 15:13 funnel and acetone 15:31 mixture of equal parts of vinegar, salt and flour 15:55 nylon brush for kitchen 16:10 steel wire brush 16:16 sandpaper for metal (grid 240, 400) 16:22 cotton buffing wheel 17:12 300g hammer 17:31 300g hammer 18:08 lamp oil 18:14 tweezers 19:25 lighter My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english.


Antique Soldering Iron (Blowtorch) - Hot Restoration
Apr 25 2019 22 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an old german soldering iron. This item was sent to me by one of my patrons from Germany. He saw it on eBay, asked me if I'm interested and then he bought it. Thank you for that. I'll send it back to him now. I really liked the look of the handle and that's why I decided to restore it. It's a propane gas powered soldering iron made by Perkeo. I don't know how old this one is, but they built them since 1919 until today. The modern ones still look pretty much the same as the one I restored in this video, they just made some small changes over the years. I'm very happy how this project turned out, I really like the contrast of the dark wooden handle and the polished brass. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora afreeflyingsoul sunniva thingstad Micky McKay Alan Hanson Alex Roussos Gregory Joan Casanovas John Romero M. A. Paul Mampilly SA Graver Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Alejandro Cavazos Allan Mckenzie audi4444player Bastian Alexander Bloatmage Brian Boots Clément BERNARD Conor Fowler Dapper Dave Ahern Dawson Mertz Drew Bell Ernest Duran Giambattista Martino Guillaume Ladouceur Harrison Hughes Jack Champion Jack Tian Jake Jeff Carr Jeff Vier joe Joel Margolis Julie Smith justin f. Jörg Thomsen Kersten Rienow Kevin Lambapalooza Llewellyn Schubert Lucy Lole Marc P marilyne stotz Mark Anderson Martin Kunz Matthew Hendrix Matthew Ruediger Merkias Mikko Repka Moeparker Pascal Bertossa Phoebe Knight Ruslan Balkin Rybread Sasan Hezarkhani Sebastian Wüst Seth Feist Sheepless Shu Stephen Lemon Thibaut Hiegel Wambaquamba XxJonathXx Yitch Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:36 disassembling 02:18 showing all the parts 02:39 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:57 disassemling two more parts 03:17 removing patina and soot with vinegar, salt and flour 04:07 restoring the wooden handle 04:40 restoring the big tube 06:10 stain the wooden handle 06:38 making a new ring for the wooden handle on the lathe 07:36 restoring the nut which tightens the wooden hanlde 08:04 restoring the holder of the soldering iron 08:46 restoring the sieving head and remake the knurling 09:21 restoring the sieving head cover 09:59 restoring the knurled ring 10:22 restoring the regulation part 10:47 restoring the valve needle 11:07 restoring the nut for the regulation part 11:31 restoring the valve tube 12:16 restoring the gas connection part 12:47 restoring the nut for the valve tube 13:13 restoring the nozzle 13:41 restoring the soldering iron 14:46 making a new holder for the soldering iron on the lathe, mill and welding machine 16:26 making a special countersinked bolt for the soldering iron 16:56 restoring the bolt to clamp the soldering iron holder 17:18 making a new handle for the previous restored bolt 18:47 making the steel parts black by heating up and quench in oil 19:14 showing all the parts before reassembling 19:34 reassembling 21:23 showing the finished product 22:00 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 1,5 weeks $16 tube for the gas connection $1 clamp bride for the connection tube My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Antique Kitchen Scale Restoration - The Masterpiece
Jun 05 2020 26 mins  
Last time I scrolled through eBays antique section, this nice little antique kitchen scale caught my attention at the first sight. It was a little bit expensive with a price tag of $75, but I didn't even thought twice about buying it. I fell in love with it right away. The paint looked very bad, it also had some dents and some signs of its age. It was still working and had a new screw added, I guess someone quickly fixed it before selling. The plate did sit way too loose on the top part, that made me suspicious that it isn't the original one. After disassemling I thought this will be a very quick and easy restoration, but one thing came after the other and it tourned out to be the most challenging one i've done on this channel so far. I wanted to have a super glossy and perfect paint job. For that reason I applied three coats of high build primer after the regular primer and filler. Wet sanding with 400 and 800 grit made the base super smooth and perfectly even. Then it was time to apply two coats of light ivory. After it dried I masked it again and painted the brillant blue. The paint turned out absolutely amazing. The old glass cover was too messed up to even try to clean it. I milled a new one on the tiny cnc-milling machine. Instead of painting the back of it gold, I decided to mill a brass foil to put it underneath. I cut some threads into the housing and fixed the class with fake rivets in a brushed look. The whole mechanism of the scale needed much attention. I had to remake some parts that got destroyed during the disassembly. But the most difficult parts were definitely the aluminium part and the paper scale. This was my first attempt ever in metal spinning. After a few tries I knew how to do it and I was able to make an absolutely perfect part. The scale was warped due to the disassembly with water, so I had to make a new one from scratch. It required a lot of math to calculate all the diameters and angles, but it turned out very well. I spent a long time thinking about the plate. After my success with the metal spinning of the aluminium part I decided to try to make a new one out of a copper sheet. I made a negative form as a template out of wood and than spinn the copper sheet on it to a plate. After a failed tries, I suceed. The key point was to heat the sheet up before hand to make it soft. I then sanded it all clean and soldered a ring on the back. The plate, The scale with the aluminium part and the glass cover with the brass foil were definitely my personal highlights of this restoration. I think this is definitely one of the most favourite project I've done so far. It was very challenging and I had to learn many new skills to get the job done. After all I'm very happy with this restoration. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Yale Baker Adel AlSaffar afreeflyingsoul Courtney Maleport David Barker Derek Russ Gregory Justin Power Mellissa Marcus Muzaffer Aksoy Paul Mampilly Vince Valenti Alan Hanson alex latzko Allen Frank Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreas Mimra Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Anthony Adams Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Chad Bryant Cristian Zorilla Damian Rickard Dan Williams Dre Gilley Harper Kim Hunter R. JD Smith Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz Jozette Soto justin f. Kelly Imgrund LVE Marc Cerisier Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa McConnell Michael Bier Mike Donaldson Nick Cannon Pasacal Schmikal Paul Ambry Risky Deem Robert Everich Scott Marshall Stuart Mitchell Suiros The Carlsons Trevor Kam 웅록 윤 Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 4 weeks $25 kitchen scale $20 2k primer $30 high build primer $30 2k coat light ivory $30 2k coat brillant blue $25 brass foil $5 transparent plastic $10 copper sheet $5 aluminium sheet My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all an


1891 German ''Weltrekord'' Ratchet Screwdriver - Restoration
Aug 21 2020 19 mins  
It was around three months ago when I visited my friend that works at the steel waste. He made an amazing found. He found multible items that were in a very rough condition. They almost had some kind of concrete on them and a lot of heavy rust. This little screwdriver got my attention right away. It was not clearly visible what the function of it was, but I remember that I thought it might be some kind of ratchet mechanism. At home I posted a few pics of it in my Instagram story. It didn't took long for @hand tool rescue to reply, as he has the same screwdriver, just a slightly modern version of it, but similar mechanism. After some research I found some more pics and videos online. The brand is „Weltrekord“ made in Germany and it's called „Hebelschraubenzieher“ which meas „lever scredriver“. The model I found was the first ever designed one from 1891. Weltrekord later made some small changes on the design. Newer ones have a small collet to clamp the insert bits and even newer ones came with plastic handles instead of wood. At first I thought this will be a quick straight forward restoration project. It turned out to be a very tricky one. The most difficult part was definitely the disassembly, it took me three full days to get it in pieces. Heavy rust has done so much damage to all of the parts. Unfortunately the handle cracked when I removed it. I tried to restore it, but it became a huge mess and I decided to make a new one to have a nice and clean look. There's a 40 minutes version of this video on my Patreon page where I show how I tried to repair the handle. I had to weld up material on a lot of parts and machined and sanded it clean afterwards. That all worked perfectly fine. Some parts have still very slight pitting but overall it turned out very well. For the finish on the steel parts I decided to try nickel plating for the first time and it worked fantastic. I went with a brushed finish and with the nickel coat the parts turned out amazing. I really like the look of the nickel plated parts with the wooden handle. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Adel AlSaffar Gregory Alex McGeorge Courtney Maleport David Barker Greg Marston Mellissa Marcus Muzaffer Aksoy Paul Mampilly Vickie Bligh Vince Valenti Xavier Carbel Yale Baker Alex Breton alex latzko Alex Shipley Aljoscha Erlebach Allen Frank Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreas Mimra Andrew Phillips Anthony Adams Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Blake T Brian Newton Carlo Chad Bryant Chris Simondet Cristian Zorrilla Dre Gilley Grok Senften Harper Kim Hunter R. Jeremy Cole Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz Jordan Page Joshua Bentley Jozette Soto justin f. Kelly Imgrund LVE Marc Cerisier Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa McConnell Michael Bier Mike Donaldson Nick Cannon Pasacal Schmikal Paul Ambry PerryK Scott Marshall Stuart Mitchell Suiros The Carlsons Trevor Kam Warren G Strand Jr 웅록 윤 Time and costs of this restoration: $5 wood for the handle $3 spring steel wire $10 vinegar for nickel solution I was working on this project for 2 weeks My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/mymechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


I make an ''8 Ball'' out of solid Stainless Steel and Brass
Sep 10 2020 8 mins  
I had this idea since I recently discovered how to easily make balls on the milling machine and lathe. As I currently don't know what to restore next, I decided to make the 8 ball. It was a very cool little project. Very accurate work was needed to get all six individual pieces fit together with no gaps. The hardest part of this project was filming the last few shots, because it is so super shiny now and reflects everything. I really like how it turned out and it will be a nice decoration piece to look at. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Adel AlSaffar Gregory Alex McGeorge Alistair Moor Amar.k Courtney Maleport David Barker Diecast Pirate Greg Marston Lambda GPU Workstations Matt Bosch Mellissa Marcus Muzaffer Aksoy Paul Mampilly Vickie Bligh Vince Valenti Xavier Carbel Yale Baker Yuri Zapuchlak Alex Breton alex latzko Alex Shipley Allen Frank Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreas Mimra Andrew Phillips Anthony Adams Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Blake T Brian Newton Carlo Chad Bryant Chris Simondet Easy Green Grok Senften Harper Kim Hunter R. Jeremy Cole Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz Jordan Page Jozette Soto justin f. Kelly Imgrund LVE Marc Cerisier Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa McConnell Michael Bier Mickey Eisenhorn Mike Donaldson Nick Cannon Pasacal Schmikal Paul Ambry PerryK Scott Marshall Stuart Mitchell Suiros The Carlsons Todd Medbury Trevor Kam Warren G Strand Jr XL S 웅록 윤 Time and costs of this project: $25 material I was working on this project for 4 days If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/mymechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


Barn Find Oil Lamp - Perfect Restoration
Apr 03 2020 18 mins  
It was pretty much exactly three weeks ago when I last visited my friend that works at the recycling station. He always takes interesting antique items at home and sells them on eBay, so he always has very cool old and rusty stuff to restore for me. Right at the moment when I first saw this oil lamp I knew I want to make a restoration video about it. He told me that must be a barn find because of the dirt that did stick to it. Not only because I liked its design, it was also very rusty and dirty and the glass was not broken. Well, it turned out later that it was indeed broken, but the crack was not visible and I realized that myself just after cleaning with the parts washer. I was shocked when I saw the huge crack, I wasn't even sure if I made it when disassembling or cleaning. So I checked all the recordings right away to see if the crack was already there before and I was quite reliefed when I saw that I didn't do it. I did a lot of research if it would be possible to repair it, unfortunately it's impossible to fix a crack in glass. Due to safety resons it's better to replace a cracked glass anyway, but I didn't had a replacement part nor could I make a new one. As I'm only using this oil lamp as a decoration piece I decided to try my best in secure the crack to not get bigger and try to hide it as good as possible. I think I achieved a nice result with that. The oil lamp was zinc plated originally and didn't had any paint on it. I can't zinc plate and didn't like the idea of such a rough finish. So I decided to paint it, at first I wanted to make it all black. I didn't really liked the idea of having it all black and I wanted to give it a second color to play with. After long thinking I remembered „Eleanor“ from the movie „gone in 60 seconds“. I really like that grey metallic look and it fits perfectly with black in my opinion. To give it a nice touch I painted the raised letters red. I really like how this little Eleanor oil lamp turned out. I think the grey metallic body fits perfectly with the glossy black parts and the red letters „NEOLUX“ gives it a nice touch. With the nice repaired and cleaned glass this item turned into a very nice decoration piece and it makes me happy that I can show it off for display in my appartement from now on. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Markus Meier Afreeflyingsoul Gregory Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Courtney Maleport Cristian Zorilla Dan Williams David Barker Dre Gilley Hunter R. JD Smith Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz LVE Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa Marcus Muzaffer Aksoy Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Shikidixi Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Yale Baker 웅록 윤 Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:46 disassembling 02:43 showing all the parts 02:59 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 03:25 sandblasting 04:04 restoring the main part 05:58 restoring the glass holder 06:43 restoring the lever for the glass holder 07:19 showing the restored lever conection for the glass holder 07:36 applying filler 07:58 sanding all the filler 08:22 painting all the parts 09:15 painting the raised letters red 09:28 showing all the painted parts 09:48 making new rivets on the lathe 10:39 restoring the glass and repairing the crack 12:05 restoring the wick holder 13:54 cleaning the wick 14:22 making a new gasket for the cap 14:39 showing all the parts before reassembling 14:48 reassembling 16:42 showing the finished restoration 17:26 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 2 weeks $30 oil lamp $20 2k primer $30 water-based coat metallic grey $25 2k clear coat $25 2k coat jet black (RAL9005) $32 2k super glue My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to re


I turn a Stainless Bolt into a Combination Lock
Jul 14 2019 14 mins  
In this video i'm turning a stainless steel bolt into a nice little combination lock. I was always fascinated by those antique combination locks. I really like the design of them. A few weeks ago I bought one from eBay, but it turned out to be a cheap fake copy. I was really disapointed. Well if I can't buy one, then I make one myself. It was quite a challenge to get all the parts done and fit together, but the end result speaks for itself. I'm very happy how it turned out and I'm glad I made it. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Arthur Beaulieu prahS Prods Afreeflyingsoul Micky McKay Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Dan Williams Gregory Joan Casanovas John Romero Jonas Richartz Jonathan Heckerman LVE Marc P Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly TallBaldandCrafty Trevor Kam Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 intro 00:10 cutting the bolt in pieces on the lathe 00:53 making the side plates of the lock 02:14 making the first pin, shaft for wheels (fix side) 03:46 making the second pin, upper shaft (fix side) 04:37 making the third pin, key (movable side) 06:33 making the fourth pin, upper shaft (movable side) 07:16 TIG welding the pins and side plates together 07:35 sanding and polishing the welded parts 07:57 filing the slot for the secure ring 08:16 making the wheels with numbers out of brass 09:16 etching the numbers with ferric chloride 10:52 knurling the whells with the numbers 11:48 making five tiny springs with 0.3mm spring steel wire 12:20 showing the five steel balls 12:24 assembling the wheels with the numbers 12:44 making a secure ring with 0.8mm spring steel wire 13:13 assembling the secure ring 13:21 showing the finished combination lock Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 2 weeks $5 stainless steel bolt M20x70 $40 knurling wheel $2 printing the numbers $15 steel balls and spring steel wire My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Antique Watchmaker Vise - Restoration
Nov 12 2019 16 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a very rusty and stuck antique watchmaker vise. Sometimes I spend a lot of time just scrolling through the antique section of eBay without seeing something not even close to be interesting. It was exactly this case a few weeks ago, but then all of a sudden this little watchmaker vise appeared. I knew right away that I want it. I really like the small size of it with all the details and the old school design, so I bought it for $20. It had really a lot of rust and I was sceptical at the beginning if I could get rid of all the pitting and put a nice mirror polish on it, because it is very thin at two spots. It turned out to not be a problem and it worked very well. The jaws themself looked still very good after removing the rust, I've only pu a little bluing liquid on them and that was it. The bolt and the wing nut on the other hand was a big issue on this project. The thread had way too much play, the thread in the nut was not straight and it was a non standart thread size. That means I had no tools to cut this exact thread. So I need to make at least a new bolt and put a same size metric standart thread on it. With this new thread the nut doesn't fit anymore on the new bolt. If I want to repair the wing nut, I'd have to close the old thread with welding and cut in the same metric thread as on the bolt. I talked to a professional welder to close this thread, but he told me that the diameter of the hole was too small compared to it's lenght to be able to close it, or it could be that he melts the whole nut while trying to weld it. For that reason I decided to make a new one. Even though it is just a simple wing nut, this part was one of the most complicated parts I've done for this channel so far, but it turned out perfectly. I also had to replace the wooden handle because it had some cracks and the holes have become too big. At the end it turned out very great in my opinion. With the polished steel, the polished brass and the stained wood it has a very classy look and I really like it. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Noelle Sophy Armands Satrovskis Afreeflyingsoul Bryn Gilbertson Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips audi4444player Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Gregory Hunter R. Jonas Richartz LVE Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Shawn Daniels Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:42 disassembling 01:52 showing all the parts 02:07 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:32 removing the rust 03:05 removing the bolt 03:29 restoring the main part 04:55 bluing the jaws of the main part 05:16 polish the inside with selfmade tool 05:41 explaining the issue with nut and bolt 06:16 making a new bolt on the lathe and milling machine 07:45 making a new wing nut on the lathe and milling machine 10:58 restoring the small washer 11:22 making a new wooden handle 12:37 stain the wooden handle 12:47 apply linseed oil on the wooden handle 13:02 restore the brass ring 13:30 restore the eye screw 14:05 showing all the parts before reassembling 14:19 reassembling 15:16 showing the finished restoration 16:08 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 1 week $20 watchmaker vise $2 ash wood for the handle My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54i



Mirror Mirror... Wrench Restoration
Sep 05 2019 10 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a very big old rusty wrench. Last time I visited my friend I noticed this huge rusty wrench. Its size faszinated me from the first look and that's why I decided to restore it. It's for sure the easiest project I did on this channel so far, but I really enjoyed doing something „smaller“. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Stewen Guyot Afreeflyingsoul Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Gregory Joan Casanovas Jonas Richartz LVE Marc P Mellissa Marcus Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:44 sandblasting 02:43 protect the metal with oil spray 03:14 removing the marks from drop forging with files 03:29 cleaning the file 04:10 sanding with 80,120 and 180 grit 05:01 sanding with 240 and 400 grit by hand 05:40 wet sanding with 400 grit and oil spray 06:13 polishing 07:07 painting 07:58 painting the letters 08:31 removing the masking tape 08:51 showing the finished product Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 4 days $5 wrench $7 primer $11 coat signal blue (RAL 5005) My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Antique Hand Cranked Grinder - Restoration
Jun 26 2019 23 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a very old hand cranked grinder. A few weeks ago I visited my friend and we took a closer look at his barn, looking for something interesting to restore. As soon as I saw this hand cranked grinder, I knew that this would make a nice restoration video. It was all covered in wood dust and the visble steel parts were very rusty. It was still working, but the grinding wheel was very unbalanced. When I was cleaning the parts with the parts washer I found a lot of nails and screws in the gearbox, I guess I was very lucky that I didn't found any teeth from the gears. The pin connection from one gear was damaged very hard. I filled it all up with welding and machined all surfaces clean again. I decided to make a brass sleeve for the wooden handle and glued it in with epoxy. I only cleaned the grinding wheel with high pressure water and it worked very well. Due to the age of the grinder and the cleaning with the water, the two paper discs were lost. That's why I printed two new ones with my logo on it and they turned out very nice. They're there to lower the pressure on the grinding wheel from the clamping. The cover plate from the gearbox didn't fit at all, it didn't even cover everything. Because of that I decided to make a new one. For the painting I choose a black coat, as it was originally, I used filler on it to get a nice and smooth finish. I'm very happy how this project turned out, I'll keep this item for myself for display. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Scott Meola Afreeflyingsoul Micky McKay Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Alex Roussos Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Dan Williams Gregory Joan Casanovas John Romero Jonas Richartz Jonathan Heckerman LVE Paul Mampilly SA Graver Trevor Kam Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:37 disassembling 02:13 showing all the parts 02:28cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:47 removing the old paint with paint stripper 03:32 sandblasting 04:17 restoring the holder 04:39 restoring the gearbox case 05:11 restoring all shafts and gears from the gearbox 07:45 making a new pin connection 08:17 restoring the crank 08:40 restoring the wooden handle 09:05 making a brass sleeve for the wooden handle 09:51 making a steel cover for the wooden handle 10:58 making a shaft for the wooden handle 12:14 restoring the grinding wheel 13:11 making a new wooden sleeve for the grinding wheel 14:03 making a brass sleeve for the wooden sleeve 15:01 restoring the clamping disc for the grinding wheel 15:21 restoring the big shaft 15:48 making a new cover for the gearbox 16:32 restoring the joints for the big shaft 17:18 sandblasting again 17:32 bluing the steel parts 17:55 applying two component filler and sand it 18:20 applying two component primer 18:44 wet sanding 18:58 applying two component coat „jet black“ (RAL 9005) 19:30 showing the restored bolts and nuts 19:44 showing all the parts before reassembling 19:58 reassembling 22:19 showing the restored item 23:09 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 1,5 weeks $20 hand cranked grinder $20 2k primer $20 2k coat „jet black (RAL 9005) $5 wood for the sleeve $5 grease inlets $0.4 thick paper for the grinding wheel My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Iconic French Wonder Lamp - Restoration
May 31 2019 19 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an old french Wonder lamp. My good friend TysyTube Restoration bought this Wonder lamp on a flea market in Paris. He asked me if I want to restore it and obviously I said yes. He already restored two of them himself, I link his videos and channel below. These Wonder lamps are very well known in France, they're used on railroads mostly as far as I know. I first wanted to paint the inside of the lamp white, but as soon as I saw the amazing look of the sandblasted aluminium I decided to go with that. I just had to remove the casting marks first and then sandblast it again. I choose yellow for the lamp with black letters and black for the handle and the switch. It had a few brass parts that were deformed to keep them in place, which I had to grind away to loosen them. I made all these parts new on the lathe and mill and gave them a nice mirror polish. I deformed them again when reassembling, except for the threads. It was quite a challenge to organize the battery, as they're not produced anymore today. MC-51 rust remover did an amazing job on the very rusty steel parts, a bit of sanding and polishing and they appeared like brand new. Same goes for the plastic parts, I sanded them wet with 400 grit and polished them with car wax. I really like how this lamp turned out, even that the colours are not original, the yellow goes very nice with the black and polished parts in my opinion. As I mentioned above, I'll keep this lamp for myself for display. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Lewis Mocker Uwe Keim Jonathan McGhie Anthony Archer William V. Afreeflyingsoul Micky McKay Alan Hanson Alex Roussos Gregory Joan Casanovas John Romero Jonathan Heckerman Paul Mampilly SA Graver Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:33 disassembling 02:44 showing all the parts 02:59 removing the old paint with paint striper 03:40 sandblasting 04:11 restoring the aluminium case 05:14 restoring the aluminium back plate 06:03 sandblasting the inside again 06:21 polishing the brass part of the aluminium case 06:35 restoring the switch 07:01 restoring the handle 07:28 applying two component filler before painting 08:06 applying two component primer 08:18 wet sanding the primer 08:30 applying two component yellow coat (signal yellow RAL1003) 08:36 applying two component black coat (jet black RAL9005) 08:42 painting the letters black 09:00 making new brass pins on the lathe 09:48 making new brass bolts on the lathe and mill 11:15 restoring the two knurled brass knobs 12:09 rempoving rust with MC-51 on the steel parts and polish them 12:47 making two new brass pins for the handle on the lathe 13:36 restoring the shaft from the switch 14:03 showing the cleaned glass 14:07 making a new rubber gasket for the glass 14:26 restoring the front reflector 14:37 restoring the small plastic part from the front reflector 14:52 restoring the red reflector 15:09 restoring the aluminium frame from the red reflector 15:24 polishing the nickel plated sheet 15:35 showing the other polished copper parts from the switch 15:40 showing the new battery 15:46 showing all the parts before reassembling 16:03 reassembling 19:00 showing the finished lamp 19:30 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 2,5 weeks Wonder lamp was a presant from TysyTube :-) Thank you $35 Battery $20 two component primer $20 two component yellow coat (RAL1003) $20 two component black coat (RAL9005) $5 rivets $5 bulbs My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 TysyTube Restoration channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIGEtjevANE0Nqain3EqNSg TysyTube's Wonder lamp restoration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Se47FWgfub0&t=1459s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwX51aT8AJ4&t=943s If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible.


Antique Dented Oiler - Perfect Restoration
Feb 03 2019 12 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an antique dented oiler. My friend found this oiler in the steel waste at the recycling station. I really liked the unique design of it and I bought it from him for $5. It almost had no rust, but it was very dirty and had a lot of dents. The tricky part of this restoration was definitely the removing of all the dents in the can. I want to say thank you to my friend who helped me with this and to his boss, who allowed him to use the tools from his work place. Check out his website (www.huegli.swiss), they do car body repair in Zurich Switzerland. I'm very happy how it turned out and I really like the new look of the oiler. I'll keep this oiler in my shop and I'm going to use it from now on. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora Stephan Becker sunniva thingstad SA Graver Joel Miller Joan Casanovas afreeflyingsoul acemaclace Allan Mckenzie Clément BERNARD Dawson Mertz Jake Julie Smith Lucy Lole Pascal Bertossa Sheepless Ian Hutchinson Harrison Hughes Joel Margolis Llewellyn Schubert Mark Anderson Moeparker Sasan Hezarkhani Thibaut Hiegel XxJonathXx Brian Boots Wambaquamba Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:22 disassembling 01:11 showing all the parts 01:27 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 01:59 cleaning the parts with warm water and Cif 02:21 showing the three new appeared parts 02:28 removing the paint with paint stripper 02:42 removing the rust on the inside with MC-51 03:00 removing the rust on the inside with small grinding stones 03:39 removing all the dents 04:47 using filler for the welding marks 05:02 cleaning up the rest of the can 06:02 restoring the cover 06:20 masking the parts before painting 06:48 applying two component primer 06:58 wet sanding with water 07:12 applying two component green coat (RAL 6005 moss green) 07:29 restoring the tube 08:35 restoring the pump shaft 09:17 restoring the spring 09:35 making a new cork gasket 09:52 making a new felt gasket 10:05 replacing the o-ring 10:10 showing all the parts before reassembling 10:23 reassembling 11:11 showing the finished product 11:40 final testing Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for around 20h $5 oiler $20 primer (2K) $20 moss green coat (2K) $2.5 felt gasket $0.5 o-ring My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Huge Rusty Leg Vise - Perfect Restoration
Jun 15 2019 17 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a very old Blacksmith Leg Vise. My friend has found this blacksmith leg vise at the junkyard. It is huge and and very heavy, over 43kg. I really liked the size of it, the very long handle and the design from the spindle and the spring, that's why I decided to restore it and make a video about it. I think this vise is around 100 years old. What I first expected to be a simple straight foraward project turned out to be a very tricky one. After cleaning up the two big pieces with the jaws I noticed that they don't close parallel. When the jaws touched eachother on the right side, they had a 2.5mm gap on the left side. To get this restoration done properly I decided to machine them. I made an aluminium plate to clamp the vise on the milling machine. To mill the structure of the rough jaws I bought two carbide milling plates and let them customize by grinding certain angles to them. The milling worked very well and I'm very happy how the jaws turned out. After the milling I did harden and temper them again. As the holes and countersinks from the heart shaped part were very small and rough, I drilled bigger holes and made the countersinks bigger and clean for 10mm screws. I did recut the threads with a threading file, because I didn't had this threading die size. I just cleaned up the spindle with files and emery cloth, removed scrateches and sharp edges. The nut had a groove in it at the end, I closed it with TIG welding and turned the welding spots clean on the lathe. I sanded the rest with emery cloth and cleaned it up with a file. I decided to mill the rectangluar washer clean, because it was very wavy and had an overall rough shape. While I was recutting the threads from the two square nuts, I realized that they were slanted. For that reason I decided to make new ones. I bent the spring symmetrical and grinded the very rough shape clean on the belt grinder. After cleaning up all the parts I did sandblast them, made them black with bluing liquid and painted them with a dark green hammertone paint. After the reassembly I realized that the vise looks very dark overall with the dark green and all the black parts, so I would definitely choose a brighter colour for next time to achieve a nicer contrast. Besides that I'm very happy how this project turned out. My friend who allowed me to use his milling machine to remake the jaws was very fascinated by this leg vise and he really liked it, I'm going to give it to him after the restoration. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Mike Rogsch Scott Meola john ortega Joel Zwahlen Andrei Sitnikov Mathias Lincke Afreeflyingsoul Micky McKay Alan Hanson Alex Roussos Dan Williams Gregory Joan Casanovas John Romero Jonathan Heckerman LVE Paul Mampilly SA Graver Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:40 disassembling 01:24 showing all the parts 01:31 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 01:51 removing rust with MC-51 02:26 restoring the fix jaw 03:00 restoring the movable jaw 03:43 testing the jaws 04:02 sandblasting the fix and movable jaw 04:37 soften the hardened jaws 04:50 preparing to mill the jaws 05:19 machining the rough jaws on the milling machine 06:59 harden and temper the jaws 07:20 restoring the heart shaped holding plate 08:01 restoring the spindle with the handle 08:48 restoring the nut 09:55 restoring the holding plate for the spindle 10:16 restoring the rectangular washer 10:47 making two new square nuts 11:41 restoring the spring 12:20 sandblasting 13:02 making the parts black with bluing liquid 13:42 painting the parts with hammertone dark green 14:19 showing the restored blots and nut and custom washers 14:31 showing all the parts before reassembling 14:37 reassembling 15:58 showing the finished product 16:54 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 3,5 weeks $80 milling tools $200 customizing the mil


Rusty Deadlocked Vise - Perfect Restoration
Nov 06 2018 17 mins  
Broken Vise Restoration - Gressel Switzerland. In this video i'm restoring a broken swiss vise. Like, comment, subscribe. I bought this vise from a friend for 20$. It was super rusty and dirty, one part was missing, two screws were broken off and the movable jaw was completely stuck. Gressel is very well known in switzerland for making very good, if not the best vises. That fact made it absolutely worth to restore it. They still produce this type of vise today, they just made some very small changes over the years. I found out that they built their vises in this style until 1991. So it's at least 27 years old. It had the rough jaws on, but you could always choose if you want them with rough or flat jaws when you buy a new one. I'm not a fan at all of the rough jaws, because they ruin every surface of clamped pieces. So I decided to put flat jaws on. I still restored the rough ones and I'm going to keep them. I restored this vise for myself. I hope you like my work and the video. Timestamps 00:00 preview 00:35 loosen the stuck movable jaw 02:09 disassembling 04:39 restoring the spindle 05:11 removing the pins 05:45 restoring the movable jaw 06:58 restoring the body (fix jaw) 08:14 sandblasting 10:09 painting 11:02 making the missing part 12:10 restoring two screws for the missing part 13:10 restoring the jaws 13:27 reassembling 15:53 showing off the finished product If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Antique Ox-Tongue Iron - Restoration
Feb 19 2020 24 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an antique ox-tongue iron. The ox-tongue iron is named for the particular shape of the insert. It was used in the late 19th century. I bought this one on eBay for $25. The condition of this item was not too bad in terms of rust. Unfortunately the ox-tongue insert was missing. The handle had play because one nut of the two bolts was missing. During the dissasembling I realized that it had asbestos as termal isolation, I replaced it with parts made out of duroplastic. Duroplastic does not melt, it's heat resistant up to around 300°C. As the holes of the handle were not centered, I decided to drill them up and close them with glued in pins. One of the two bolts of the handle was bent, one nut and washer was missing and the used washer was too big. That's why I decided to make it all new. The door didn't fit at all, so I welded up the holes, and made new ones until the door sit flush with the top of the iron. After that I was able to make the outer contur fit. I choose to turn a few parts black. After the first sandblasting I removed all the scratches and pitting with sanding and then I sandblasted them again to achieve a very nice and even surface finish. The bluing then makes a very nice matte shiny look. I decided to polish the body, but I used bluing on the inside for rust protection. Overall I really like the look from this iron, how the colors of the wood, the black steel and the polished steel play with eachother. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Afreeflyingsoul Gregory Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips audi4444player Courtney Maleport Dan Williams David Barker Dre Gilley Ethan Hartley Hunter R. JD Smith Jonas Richartz Kelly Imgrund LVE Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Yale Baker Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:32 disassembling 01:41 showing all the parts 01:59 sandblasting 02:52 restoring the body 04:27 restoring the hinge 06:07 restoring the bolts 06:47 restoring the door 09:28 restoring the wooden handle 11:43 making new bolts, nuts and washers on the lathe 13:49 restoring the holder for the handle 14:24 restoring the reflector plate 15:10 showing the new parts out of duroplastic 15:17 making a new ox-tongue insert 17:22 making a new handle to hold the ox-tongue insert 20:51 showing the parts before reassembling 21:06 reassembling 22:34showing the finished restoration 23:36 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 3 week $25 ox-tongue iron $2 wooden pins for the handle $15 material for the ox-tongue and handle $40 reverse countersink hand tool $10 wax for wood $20 angle screwdrivers My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


1930s Oldtimer Screwdriver - Perfect Restoration
Nov 18 2018 10 mins  
1930s German Oldtimer Screwdriver - Perfect Restoration. In this video i'm restoring a german screwdriver from the 1930s. Like, comment, subscribe. My friend found this rare screwdriver in the steel waste at the recycling station. It was dirty, rusty and from its look you can tell that it had a hard life. It was bent in all directions and was used for more than just tighten and loosen screws. I really liked the design of it, specially because of the look of the handle. I've never done woodworking before in my life, that's why I decided to challenge myself and restore this beauty. As i have no clue when it comes to wood, I had to do some research first.I found out that ash wood is very common for handles in general, that's why I decided to go with it. The second thought i had after deciding to restore it was that I'm not going to use any glue to fix the handles. I'm going to use handmade rivets, I've never done that before either. I was really happy with the result, it came out exactly how I wanted. I hope you like my work and the video. Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:33 disassembling 01:33 showing all the parts 01:40 washing the parts 01:46 removing the rust 01:59 bending it back in shape 02:15 removing all deep scratches with a file 02:41 making the wooden handles 03:47 drilling the holes for the rivets 04:03 finishing the shape of the handles 04:44 countersink for the rivets 04:55 sanding and polishing the screwdriver 05:49 hardening and tempering the tip of the screwdriver 06:18 making two new rivets 06:44 preview before reassembling 07:01 reassembling 08:04 using linseed oil for the handle 08:17 showing the finished product Time and costs of this restoration: I spent around 14 hours on this project $10 Ash wood $10 Linseed oil $5 Sandpaper for wood Timestamps of used tools and machines: 00:40 bench grinder 00:47 300g hammer and 3mm punch 01:04 2mm punch 01:40 parts washer with parts cleaner liquid, google it ;-) 01:46 steel wire brush 01:48 Dremel steel wire brushes 02:05 500g hammer 02:11 adjustable wrench 02:15 triangular file 02:31 flat file 02:51 belt grinder (grid 60) 03:26 semicircular rasp file 03:47 hand drill machine with drill 3.3mm 04:11 semicircular rasp file 04:17 wood sandpaper (grid 40, 80, 120, 150) 04:44 column drill with 3 lip countersink 05:01 metal sandpaper (grid 120, 240, 400) 05:27 polish paste 05:29 cotton polish disc 05:49 acetylene/oxygen torch 05:58 any oil will work 06:05 bakeoven 06:11 sandpaper (grid 400) 06:18 lathe Weiler 07:01 grease 08:04 linseed oil 09:29 bolt M8 My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/



Broken Deadlocked Vise - Perfect Restoration (I did it again)
Apr 20 2020 24 mins  
I bought this vise pretty much 1.5 years ago together with the other Gressel bench vise I already restored and made a video. I also payed $20 for this one. Since then it was laying aroung in my basement. I always knew that I'll restore this one as well, just because it's a Gressel and it will totally worth to safe it from the trash. This one wasn't that rusty like the other one, but it was also completely deadlocked. The handle was beaten up and bent. The jaws, some screws and two pieces to hold the spindle were missing. The pin that secures the spindle from turning was broken. Because of all that the spindle fell out. This vise has two threads and two concentric bushings to keep the jaws in place. Talking to Gressel I found out that this method was only produced until 1960, so it's at least 60 years old now. It could be from 1943, as both parts had a „43“ stamped on them. As these original jaws are getting no longer produced, I decided to drill an extra hole between the threads to be able to use new jaws. Gressel was so nice to send me new flat jaws. All the bare surfaces were in really bad condition due to heavy use, that's why I decided to weld up material and clean all these surfaces on the milling machine. I replaced the handle with a new one, but I used the old rounded ends again which turned out great. I later secured the ends with Loctite when reassembling. I also made the two missing screws and the broken pin out of the old handle. I choose to paint the whole vise the same color as the movable jaws from the new Gressel vises are, cobalt blue (RAL5013). I think it turned out very well, the white lettering, the shiny bare spots and the black parts match very well. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Adel AlSaffar afreeflyingsoul David Barker Gregory Muzaffer Aksoy Vince Valenti Yale Baker Alan Hanson alex latzko Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreas Mimra Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Anthony Adams Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Courtney Maleport Cristian Zorilla Dan Williams Dre Gilley Harper Kim Hunter R. JD Smith Jessica Alexander Joel Miller Jonas Richartz LVE Marc Cercier Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mauricio Pacheco Mellissa Marcus Mellissa McConnell Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Risky Deem Robert Everich Shikidixi Trevor Kam TRG Restoration 웅록 윤 Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:44 disassembling 02:45 showing all the parts 02:53 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 03:11 removing the old bushings 04:24 sandblasting 05:17 restoring the fix jaw 07:57 restoring the movable jaw 09:45 restoring the ends of the handle 10:37 making a new handle on the lathe 11:48 restoring the spindle nut 13:15 restoring the spindle nut holder plate 14:05 making two new screws for the plate on the lathe and milling machine 15:27 restoring the spindle 16:21 making a new pin for the spindle on the lathe 17:04 making the missing parts for the spindle on the lathe and milling machine 18:12 applying filler 18:52 painting 19:41 showing the new jaws 19:54 showing the new hardened pins 19:57 showing all parts before reassembling 20:09 reassembling 22:26 showing the finished restoration 23:22 final test 23:49 Patreon supporters Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 2 weeks $20 vise $20 2k primer $30 2k coat cobalt blue (RAL5013) $30 steel for new parts My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/mymechanics M


Antique Rusty Hand Plane - Restoration
Sep 25 2019 22 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an antique Stanley hand plane. My friend has found this very old Stanley hand plane at the steel waste. When I saw it the first time at his place I wanted to restore it immediately, so I bought it for $10. This Stanley no. 122 hand plane was manufactured from 1877 until 1918, it's at least 101 years old. This plane is from the „liberty bell“ series, they were first produced in 1876 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the American Declaration of Independence (1776). That's the reason why the liberty bell is imprinted on the lever cap. As I'm not a woodworker at all and I've never used a hand plane before in my life, I had to do a lot of research how this thing even works to understand the function of each part. It turned out that the iron and the backing iron were assembled wrongly and there was also one part missing, which holds both of these parts together. As the iron was an original Stanley part, it wasn't the correct one for this plane. The bigger hole in the slot was on the wrong end, that's why I made a new one. I tried to keep as many parts as possible original on this restoration. I only replaced two small screws, made the missing part and a new iron. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Noelle Sophy Matthew Holcomb Afreeflyingsoul Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Gregory Jonas Richartz LVE Mellissa Marcus Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:37 disassembling 02:08 showing all the parts 02:24 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:40 removing the old paint with paint stripper 03:13 soaking the parts in rust remover 03:28 washing the wooden parts with warm soapy water 03:47 showing the cleaned parts 03:55 restoring the wooden body 05:59 removing the stuck thread 06:27 restoring the cast body 06:53 restoring the lever cap 07:06 restoring the lever 07:30 restoring the lever cap screw 07:47 sandblasting 09:01 applying filler 09:29 applying two component primer 09:42 applying two component black coat 10:05 restoring the shaft with slot 10:39 restoring the pin from the lever 11:00 making a new iron on the milling machine 12:22 hardening and tempering the iron 13:30 restoring the backing iron 14:02 restoring the depth adjuster part 14:29 restoring the nut 14:53 making the missing part on the lathe 15:51 making the three small parts black 16:10 restoring the wooden knob 17:05 restoring the big screw from the wooden knob 17:27 replacing the two small screws 17:54 showing all the parts before reassembling 18:12 reassembling 20:16 showing the finished restoration 21:17 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 2.5 weeks $10 hand plane $40 painting (primer and black coat) $5 steel for the iron $1 two small screws My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


1950s Tire Inflator - Perfect Restoration
Oct 25 2018 23 mins  
1950s Broken Tire Inflator with Pressure Gauge Restoration - Ceccato. In this video i'm restoring a broken italian tire inflator with pressure gauge from the 1950s. Like, comment, subscribe. I found this tire inflator with pressure gauge, which dessperetly needed a restoration. It was broken. Air was leaking everywhere, the handle wasn't working properly anymore and the pressure gauge didn't work either. This was definitely the most challenging restoration i did so far. I hope you like the result and the video. Timestamps 00:00 preview and pretesting 00:59 disassembling 04:18 cleaning the parts with the partswasher 04:31 restoring the body 05:46 making a new bolt for the handle 06:11 restoring the handle 06:41 restoring the nuts 07:04 making new gaskets for the nuts 07:13 restoring the valve 07:47 making new gaskets for the valve 08:09 making a new glass for the pressure gauge 09:05 making a new gasket for the glass of the pressure gauge 09:22 making a new dial for the pressure gauge 11:27 the issue with the pressure gauge 12:03 making a distance disc for the pressure gauge 12:43 restoring the cover from the pressure gauge 13:14 making 10 new tiny bolts for the pressure gauge 13:47 restoring the case from the pressure gauge 14:42 restoring the tube with the valves 15:31 restoring the blue handle 15:46 making a new gasket for the pressure gauge 16:20 overview before assembling 16:52 assembling the body 18:33 assembling the tube with the valves 19:24 assembling and adjustment of the pressure gauge 21:42 showing off the finished product 22:47 final test If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Antique Rusty Pruning Saw - Too Broken to Restore... I Make a New One
Oct 07 2020 13 mins  
This old rusty and broken pruning rip saw was sent to me by a follower on Instagram. He was on a mission to clean the Swiss Alps from trash. They removed around two tons of trash in total. At the Albert-Heim-Hut, which was built in 1918, he found this old pruning saw. It must have been digged into the ground for decades. It was in a terrible condition to say the least. The handle was missing half of it and the wood was rotten. The blade looked very bad, it had very thick layers of rust and dirt on it. Right when I saw this saw for the first time on a picture I knew this will be a very difficult project. It was very obvious that I need to replace the handle, the question was if I could possibly save the blade. Because otherwise there would be nothing left from the original saw after the restoration. After sandblasting it was very clear right away that the damage on the blade is beyond repair. Rust has eaten away a lot of material, some teeth were missing and there was heavy pitting all over the blade. I thought for a few days what I want to do with this project. Should I trash it and start something new, or should I keep going and replace what needs to be replaced, even though there would only two brass plates stay from the original saw. I also asked this question to my Patreon and channel members and the answer was a very clear „yes, keep going“. And that's what I did. For the blade I choose a stainless high carbon steel (1.4116). As the original teeth had no offset, it was very easy to make a new one. Therefore was the blade tapered, I managed to achieve that with a file. For the hardening I wraped the blade in stainless steel foil, heat it up to 1050°C for a good 20 minutes and then quench in preheated (60°C) oil. I only made one tempering cycle right after the quench in a bakeoven for 2 hours at 250°C. I didn't want the blade to be too hard so it can still stay felxible. I decided to make the handle out of smoked oak. It's a very common wood in Switzerland. That was my first time working with this type of wood and I loved it. Its hardness made it very nice to work with. The dark color fits perfectly with the brass. I think this project is a very good example of the ship of Theseus. Even though there are just two parts left from the original saw, you could say this is a new saw and others might say it's still the old one just restored/repaired. For me this is clear, it still is the old saw. What happens if the handle of your saw breaks? You'll replace it and it's still your saw. What happens if the blade breaks short after? You'll replace it and it's still your saw. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Tonya M Broerman Adel AlSaffar Yale Baker Gregory Alex McGeorge Alistair Moor Amar.k Courtney Maleport David Barker Diecast Pirate Greg Marston Lambda GPU Workstations Luke Schmick Matt Bosch Mellissa Marcus Muzaffer Aksoy Paul Mampilly Todd Medbury Vickie Bligh Vince Valenti Xavier Carbel Yuri Zapuchlak Alex Breton alex latzko Alex Shipley Allen Frank Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreas Mimra Andrew Phillips Anthony Adams Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Blake T Brian Newton Carlo Chad Bryant Chris Simondet Easy Green Grok Senften Haley McFadden Harper Kim Hunter R. Jeremy Cole Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz Jordan Page justin f. Kelly Imgrund Marc Cerisier Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa McConnell Michael Bier Mickey Eisenhorn Mike Donaldson Nick Cannon Pasacal Schmikal Paul Ambry Scott Marshall Stuart Mitchell Suiros The Carlsons Trevor Kam Tucker Ifft Warren G Strand Jr William Wallace XL S 웅록 윤 Time and costs of this project: $5 steel for the blade 1.4116 $2 smoked oak (wood) $50 dovetail mill for saw teeth Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/mymechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w


Rusty Jammed Rebar Cutter - Restoration
Oct 21 2019 24 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a hopeless case of a super rusty rebar cutter. People from all over the world send me pictures of their items they'd like to have restored by me in a video. Mostly the items do not look bad enough, not enough rust or not broken enough for an interesting video. However this rebar cutter caught my attention from the first look at it. Marco from Italy was so nice to ship it to me to Switzerland, he gave me this shear for free means he doesn't want to have it back. Thank you very much for that. Right when I saw the pictures I knew this would probably be a very challenging restoration because of all that rust. I assumed that it would be all seized up and a nightmare to disassemble and I was right. This cutter only has four bolts and is built together by only five parts, but I was busy with the disassembling for three days. It was very difficult to get the two big bolts out, specially the smaller one. It needed 12 tons on the hydraulic press and I needed to drill one bolt hollow. I made a lot of parts new on this project, I've only kept three parts original: the body and the two moving parts. As the handle was missing, I made a new one which required quite a few steps of machining, welding and grinding but the end result turned out very nice. As I almost made the whole thing new I decided to give this tool a modern touch with the choice of colour, that's why I went with orange. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Matthew Holcomb Afreeflyingsoul Andreas Prüm Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips audi4444player Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Gregory Hunter R. Jonas Richartz LVE Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:33 disassembling 04:07 showing all the parts 04:21 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 04:33 sandblasting 05:24 showing the sandblasted parts 05:31 restoring the body 07:01 restoring the movable jaw 07:37 restoring the movable gear part 08:14 making the small nut on the lathe 08:59 making the big nut 09:12 making the small bolt on the lathe 10:21 making the big bolt 10:35 making two washers for the bolts on the lathe 11:11 making two new M8 bolts and washers on the lathe 12:10 start of making the missing handle 12:15 preparing the tube on the lathe 12:54 making the domed cap on the lathe 13:20 welding the domed cap on the tube 13:29 cleaning up the welds of the domed cap on the lathe 13:46 making the connection piece to the tool on the lathe 14:57 milling the sides flat and welding up the plates 16:19 welding the connection piece on the tube and turn it clean on the lathe 16:50 making two threads in the connection piece 17:14 sandblasting the handle 17:28 bluing all the parts 18:08 painting the handle and the body 18:43 making two new cutting bits 19:20 hardening and tempering the cutting bits 20:03 showing all the parts before reassembling 20:17 reassembling 21:52 showing the finished restoration 22:43 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 3.5 weeks $60 painting (primer and orange coat) $50 dinner for my friend for the hardening :-) My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-19


1918 Aircraft Rivet Hammer - Restoration
Feb 21 2019 19 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an aircraft rivet hammer. This pneumatic rivet hammer was sent to me by one of my subscribers from germany, thank you for that. It's a very cool and unique looking tool, I've never seen this tool before and that's why I decided to restore it and make a video for you guys. I was told that this tool was stored in the basement when they had a flooding, that was probaly the reason why it was rusty and didn't work anymore. I had a few ups and downs during this restoration. The cast of the aluminium handle was very porous and a lot of tiny holes appeared after fine sanding and polishing, also the welding didn't work quite well. I first tried to TIG weld, but that didn't work at all. For the visible steel parts I decided to make them black, for the optic and also as rust protection. My idea was to sandblast those parts to make a nice and even finish, but because I'm using very fine glas bead all the small damages in the surface from the rust were still visible. So I had to sand them all away. The bluing worked very well and it makes a nice contrast to the polished parts in my oppinion. The old air fitting was put together out of three different pieces made of brass to get the right thread size. I didn't really liked that option and decided to make a new one. I really wasn't pleased during the restoration just because of the porous cast of the handle and I thought about it for a long time to not even publish the video because of that. But as soon as I tested it after the restoration I had a huge smile all over my face, this is a very cool tool and it ended up working perfectly fine. I hope you don't judge me to hard for my very bad welding abilities and the bad outcome of the aluminium handle. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora sunniva thingstad SA Graver Joel Miller Joan Casanovas afreeflyingsoul acemaclace Zachary Grimes Mohammed Ali Al Juboori Allan Mckenzie audi4444player brian Boots Clément BERNARD Conor Fowler Dave Ahern Dawson Mertz Harrison Hughes Ian Hutchinson Jake Joel Margolis Julie Smith Kersten Rienow Llewellyn Schubert Lucy Lole Mark Anderson Martin Kunz Matthew Ruediger Moeparker Mr Lee Webb Pascal Bertossa Rybread Sasan Hezarkhani Sheepless Stephen Lemon terry day Thibaut Hiegel Wambaquamba XxJonathXx Yitch Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:25 pre-testing 00:33 disassembling 02:22 showing all the parts 02:39 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:57 removing rust with MC-51 rust remover 03:26 restoring the aluminium handle 06:43 making a new pin for the trigger on the lathe 07:07 restoring the front piece (hammer head) 07:31 restoring the adjustment screw 08:00 making a new air fitting on the lathe and mill 09:35 roughly cleaning all parts for sandblasting 10:56 masking for sandblasting 11:14 sandblasting the visible steel parts 12:04 sanding the sandblasted parts 13:00 restoring the small pin 13:16 bluing the visible steel parts 14:09 cleaning the mechanical parts 15:43 showing all the parts before reassembling 16:10 reassembling 18:23 showing the finished product 19:08 final testing Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 2,5 weeks $30 flex hone $10 steel wire brushes $20 dinner for my friend who helped me welding :-) My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Rusty Arbor Press - Restoration
Nov 29 2019 21 mins  
In this video i'm restoring a rusty arbor press. Ever since I started my channel I had an arbor press on my wish list to restore. Not just because it's an interesting good looking item, mainly because I want to have one in my shop. So I got very excited when my friend called me two weeks ago and told me that he has found one on the steel waste. It's a small Fehlmann arbor press, they're very famous in switzerland for making the best ones. I choose turquise blue for the main body and painted the letters black and I really like how to colour turned out. Unfortunately the table was missing, so I had to make a new one. I first planed to mill the slots on a CNC milling machine, but I couldn't get access to one in time so I decided to make it manually. It took some time to find a way to make them, took even more time to make them, but the endresult speaks for itself. It turned out absolutely perfect. I went with bluing on the gear part of the handle and sanded the handle itself. The name plate was from the previous seller of this press, it's a well known seller for machines in Switzerland. As the plate was too damaged to use again, I decided to make my own „my mechanics“ plate out of aluminium. It took me three tries to get it to work and I ended up with a very nice and clean plate at the end. I went with a brushed finish for the name plate, as it fits the other finishes very well. Overall I'm very happy how the press turned out. I really like the contrast of the different colours and finishes and I'm more than happy to finally own an arbor press in my shop. This tool will be very usefull and will for sure appear in future videos. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Daniele Castoldi Noelle Sophy Afreeflyingsoul Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips audi4444player Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Dre Gilley Gregory Hunter R. Jonas Richartz LVE Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Shawn Daniels Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Yale Baker Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:42 disassembling 01:36 showing all the parts 01:45 removing the old paint with paint stripper 02:38 sandblasting 03:27 restoring the main body 04:12 applying filler on the main body 04:45 sanding the unpainted surfaces of the main body 05:14 masking the main body 05:32 applying two component primer on the main body 05:41 applying two component coat „turquise blue“ on the main body 05:51 painting the letters black of the main body 06:12 making the missing table on the lathe and milling machine 10:20 cleaning the other parts with the parts washer 10:41 removing the rust with rust remover 11:20 restoring the gear rack 12:31 restoring the handle 14:28 restoring the bolt 15:00 restoring the big washer 15:44 making a new name plate 17:39 showing the parts before reassembling 17:56 reassembling 18:55 showing the finished restoration 20:04 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 1 week $30 arbor press $50 primer and coat $8 steel for the table $10 aluminium sheet for the name plate My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


Antique Rusty Micrometer - Precise Restoration
Mar 13 2019 18 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an antique swiss watchmaker micrometer. I bought this micrometer on eBay for $25. When I was scrolling through the antique section of eBay and first saw this micrometer I wanted to restore it right away. I really like the unique look of those watchmaker micrometers. As a professional CNC-mechanic I'm very familiar with those measurement devices and I'm using them on a daily basis. The measurement range of this micrometer is from 0-25mm and you can measure exactly on 0.005mm. The micrometer was in a very bad condition, it was very rusty and it was kind of stuck. It was once re-painted to yellow, the original colour was black. That's why I decided to paint it black again. In the front of the micrometer there was a plate with the name and the location of the previous owner mounted with two rivets. The plate was in very bad condition and as I'm the new owner of it, I decided to make a new plate with my name and my location. I choosed to create the plate with etching using ferric-chloride. I've never done that before, but the result came out very nice. Unfortunately I wasn't able to remove all the spots from the rust on the two parts with the scale on it, if I would sand it more I would lose the engravings. I'm still very happy how this restoration turned out. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora sunniva thingstad SA Graver Joel Miller Joan Casanovas afreeflyingsoul acemaclace Zachary Grimes Sharath Padmanabhan Allan Mckenzie audi4444player Bastian Alexander Bloatmage Brian Boots Clément BERNARD Conor Fowler Dave Ahern Dawson Mertz Harrison Hughes Ian Hutchinson Jack Champion Jake Joel Margolis Julie Smith Kersten Rienow Llewellyn Schubert Lucy Lole Mark Anderson Martin Kunz Matthew Hendrix Matthew Ruediger Moeparker Pascal Bertossa Rybread Sasan Hezarkhani Sheepless Stephen Lemon Thibaut Hiegel Wambaquamba XxJonathXx Yitch Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:30 disassembling 02:01 showing all the parts 02:15 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:28 removing the old paint with paint stripper 02:45 removing the stuck parts 03:04 removing rust with MC-51 03:37 restoring the main part 06:08 restoring the parts for bluing 07:18 bluing 07:55 the missing spring 08:10 making a new spring 09:09 restoring the engraved parts 10:56 restoring the spindle and anvil 11:57 making two new bolts on the lathe for clamping the anvil 12:43 restoring the play adjustment ring 13:08 showing the spindle which didn't need restoration 13:16 making a new name plate 15:59 overview before reassembling 16:05 reasembling 17:12 calibration of the micrometer 17:52 mounting the new name plate with rivets 17:59 showing the finished product 18:30 measuring a part with the restored micrometer Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 2,5 weeks $25 micrometer $20 two component primer $20 two component coat (jet black RAL9005) $35 ferric-chloride $5 spring wire steel and brass foil My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/



Broken Rusty Lock with Missing Key - Restoration
Dec 19 2019 21 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an old broken and rusty Padlock. This Padlock was sent to me by one of my subsrcibers from Italy. Right when I saw the picture I knew I want to restore this lock and I was impatiently waiting for the package to arrive. I found out that his padlock was made in Germany by Kamp in the 1930s. The lock was very rusty, the key was missing and it seemed to be broken. It was also very rusty inside, all moving parts were stuck and the closing mechanism was broken. Due to the amount of damage on the case due to rust I decided to paint it. This way I can use filler to achieve a nice finish, otherwise I'd had to sand all pitting off and there was just not enough material left to do so. The plates from the mechanism were damaged a lot too, but they were all still functional. So I only removed all sharp edges and gave them a nice bluing finish for rust protection. The aluminium part, where the key comes in was damaged a lot too and had a lot of play in the case. If I would sand it clean it would get even more play. For those reasons I decided to make a new one, I choose bronze because it would fit better to the overall look at the end. Making the key was quite a challenge, but it turned out very well and it actually worked. In my opinion the padlock turned out very well and I'm very happy with the endresult. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Daniele Castoldi Tyler Nelson Afreeflyingsoul Gregory Ricardo David Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips audi4444player Courtney Maleport Dan Williams Dre Gilley Ethan Hartley Hunter R. JD Smith Jonas Richartz LVE Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Shawn Daniels Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Yale Baker Zachary Grimes Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:39 disassembling 02:09 showing all the parts 02:22 cleaning the parts with the parts washer 02:50 sandblasting 03:29 restoring the case 06:18 restoring the shackle 07:38 making two brass parts to support the shackle sideways 08:17 restoring the plates 08:58 remaking the broken part 10:09 making a new spring 10:53 making new pins on the lathe 11:37 making three rings for the blind rivets 12:08 making a new front cover 13:34 making a new part for the key on the lathe and mill 15:19 making a new key 18:12 showing the parts before reassembling 18:31 reassembling 20:25 showing the finished restoration 21:05 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 2 week $10 steel for the frontplate and closing mechanism $10 steel for the pins and key $50 paint $25 rivets My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


Antique Rusty Hacksaw with Broken Blade - Restoration
Mar 20 2020 21 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an antique broken hacksaw. At the end of 2019 I recieved an e-mail from a subscriber from Germany. He sent me pictures of an old broken hacksaw that he has found in his garage. I really like the look of it, especially the clamping lever. I've never seen a clamping mechanism like it on a hacksaw, they usually just have wingnuts to put tention on the blade. I also liked the fact that the blade was broken. He was so nice to send me this hacksaw for free and support the channel with it. Thank you very much. The restoration itself wasn't that complicated, as the function of this tool is very simple and it doesn't have a lot of parts. The most interesting part was definitely the restoration of the broken blade in my opinion. It's very common to weld broken saw blades, there are actually some bandsaws on the market that have an extra welding mechanism attached to it. As I can't TIG weld I had to use my MIG and the result turned out very well. After the sandblasting markings appeared on the main part. Because of them I couldn't sand all the pitting away, that's why I only choose to sand it very gently and keep the markings. It turned out very well after the bluing and gave the whole saw a nice antique touch. One of the two parts with the cones and the slots that hold the blade was really messed up. That's why I decided to replace them both and make new ones on the lathe and mill. I didn't want to use rivets again to hold the blade, as it's very unfortunate if you need to remove the blade to sharpen or replace it. I decided to make two additional screws to hold it in place. I went with a slotted round head on them to add an antique touch. After all, I really like the look of this hacksaw. The black parts with the dark wooden handle, the old aggressive looking saw blade and the new polished parts. They all fit together very nicely and it actually works. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Noelle Sophy Afreeflyingsoul Gregory Adel AlSaffar Alan Hanson Amanda Taylor, Esq Andreswara Hermawan Andrew Phillips Arni Bjorgvinsson audi4444player Courtney Maleport Cristian Zorilla Dan Williams David Barker Dre Gilley Hunter R. JD Smith Jessica Alexander Jonas Richartz LVE Martin Rønnow Klarlund Mellissa Marcus Nick Cannon Paul Ambry Paul Mampilly Shikidixi Trevor Kam TRG Restoration Vince Valenti Yale Baker Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:45 disassembling 02:43 showing all the parts 02:57 sandblasting 03:48 restoring the main part 06:54 restoring the clamping lever 08:44 making a new screwable rivet on the lathe 10:54 restoring the wooden handle 12:54 making two new flathead screws on the lathe and mill 13:58 restoring the saw blade 15:38 making two new saw blade holders on the lathe and mill 17:15 making two new screws to hold the saw blade in place 18:16 showing the parts before reassembling 18:36 reassembling 19:40 showing the finished restoration 20:34 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project for 2 weeks $10 Material for the new parts $25 Tap Drill M2.5 My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) „I make a new one“ T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Second Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4EQCwfH54ieNPswtXh5K0w My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/ My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/My-mechanics-1966277857002099/


Rusty Old Coffee Grinder - Perfect Restoration
Apr 03 2019 26 mins  
In this video i'm restoring an old coffee grinder. A few weeks ago I bought an old bench grinder to restore on eBay. The guy who sold it was actually selling more antiques, he had a room filled with old items. I took a look at his other stuff and this unique coffee grinder caught my attention right away. So I ended up buying it for $35. The one thing that really impressed me on this coffee grinder was the metal body, usually they're made of wood. I also liked the colour very much. The restoration itself turned out to be a lot more challenging than I first expected. I'm very happy with the final result of this coffee grinder. I really like how the handle turned out. I hope you like my work and the video. Huge thank you to all of my Patreon and PayPal supporters and specially to: Paulina Zamora sunniva thingstad afreeflyingsoul Chris & Darcey Gregory Joan Casanovas Joel Miller John Romero M. A. SA Graver Zachary Grimes Alejandro Cavazos Allan Mckenzie audi4444player Bastian Alexander Bloatmage Brian Boots Clément BERNARD Conor Fowler Dapper Dave Ahern Dawson Mertz Ernest Duran Giambattista Martino Harrison Hughes Jack Champion Jake Jeff Carr joe Joel Margolis Julie Smith Kersten Rienow Llewellyn Schubert Lucy Lole marilyne stotz Mark Anderson Martin Kunz Matthew Hendrix Matthew Ruediger Merkias Mikko Repka Moeparker Pascal Bertossa Rybread Sasan Hezarkhani Sebastian Wüst Seth Feist Sheepless Stephen Lemon Thibaut Hiegel Thomas Wambaquamba XxJonathXx Yitch Timestamps: 00:00 preview 00:36 disassembling 02:45 showing all the parts 02:55 cleaning the parts with warm water 03:17 removing the old paint with paint stripper 03:46 sandblasting 04:34 restoring the main part 05:32 restoring the drawer 05:58 restoring the wooden plate 07:44 restoring the shaft holder 08:26 making 4 new bolts for the shaft holder on the lathe 09:12 making 4 new square nuts and washers for these bolts on the lathe 09:55 restoring the top cover 10:35 restoring the hopper 12:29 making 4 copper rivets for the hopper 13:05 removing rust with MC-51 13:21 restoring the grinder ring 13:47 restoring the grinder shaft 14:56 restoring the two brass nuts 15:20 making a special brass washer for the nuts on the lathe 15:45 restoring and modify the complete handle 20:27 apply filler to the painted parts 20:58 apply 2k primer 21:08 wet sanding the primer 21:25 apply 2k matt black coat the the drawer (RAL 9005) 21:31 apply 2k sand yellow coat (RAL 1002) 21:54 replacing the old screws 22:11 showing all the parts before reassembling 22:30 reassembling 24:57 showing the finished product 25:33 final test Time and costs of this restoration: I was working on this project over 2,5 weeks $35 coffee grinder $20 two component primer $28 two component coat (sand yellow RAL 1002) $20 two component matt coat (jet black RAL 9005) $2 wooden pins $8 glue for wood $10 solvent stain and brass screws My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 Links: MC-51 rust remover: http://www.mc-51.com/ If you have any questions about the process, machines i'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) my mechanics T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/my-mechanics My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


Handmade Silver Play Button - No Power Tools
Nov 28 2018 6 mins  
Handmade Play Button - No Power Tools. In this video i'm going to make a YouTube play button out of a piece of aluminium without any power tools. Like, comment, subscribe. First I want to say thank you to each and everyone of you guys. Your support on this channel lately is just amazing. I passed 100'000 subscribers like 12 days ago. As I need to do some research and order some stuff for my current restoration, I decided to make a „silver“ play button without any power tools. I hope you like my work and the video. Timestamps: 00:00 starting with a piece of aluminium 00:12 drawing the outline with a template 00:36 making the outer contour with a multifile 01:31 making the front side with a multifile 02:58 start removing scratches with a flat blunt-ended file 03:31 removing scratches with sandpaper 120/240/400 03:53 making the triangle with a grooving chisel 04:42 making a mirror polish 05:39 showing the finished product Time and costs of this restoration: I spent around 12 hours on this project $5 aluminium $30 multifile $30 flat blunt-ended file $8 flat chisel Timestamps of used tools and machines: 00:27 multifile 02:58 flat blunt-ended file 03:31 metal sandpaper 120/180/400 04:00 grooving chisel and 300g hammer 04:22 flat chisel 04:26 rounded and polished punch 04:42 Motorex oil spray (simular to WD-40) 04:56 one layer of a cotton buffing wheel 05:58 polish paste My camera: Panasonic HC-V180 If you have any questions about the process, tools I'm using or other stuff, just ask me in the comments. I read them all and i try to reply as soon as possible. Sorry for my bad english, it's not my language. I try my best to improve my technical english. Subscribe for more of my content. I'm uploading videos about mechanical stuff, as new creations and buildings and also restorations. Thank you for watching :-) My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/mymechanics Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/my_mechanics/


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