3 Women 3 Ways

Aug 29 2020 58 mins 716

3 Women 3 Ways radio shows feature world recognized experts and researchers to deliver current, objective and engaging information to raise awareness of social justice issues especially gendered violence and equality.











VICTIMS’ ADVOCATES: WHO, WHERE AND WHAT?
May 16 2020 55 mins  
VICTIMS’ ADVOCATES: WHO, WHERE AND WHAT? Relatively unnoticed by the general population during the pandemic news and focus was the April observation of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. Among those who paid attention to the event were crime victim advocates, especially Anne Seymour, an advocate for 36 years. So what does a crime victim advocate do? And when did that become a thing, anyway? Seymour, who practically invented the job, started by becoming involved at a grass roots level with Mothers Against Drunk Drivers, and when she found herself in the White House watching then President Regan as he began the focus on victim’s rights, she decided this was the path she would take. And taken it she has. She Director of the Fairness, Dignity And Respect for Crime Victims and Survivors Project and is the consultant to the Pew Charitable Trusts Public Safety Performance Project. She’s developed training and assistance programs, authored books and studies and even helped develop curricula for training advocates. Join us as we discuss the concept of victims’ rights, the creation of task forces and agencies to help those affected by crime, the implementation of policy at all levels to see such help is available, and the people who have stepped forward to assist such victims. Airing for the first time, Saturday, May 6, at 11 AM Pacific Time, and available thereafter through the archive at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.











CALIFORNIA PROTECTIVE PARENTS ASSOCIATION: EDUCATING AND ADVOCATING FOR CHILDREN
Nov 09 2019 59 mins  
CALIFORNIA PROTECTIVE PARENTS ASSOCIATION: EDUCATING AND ADVOCATING FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES What started as a park bench conversation about protective parents losing their children to abusers in family courts has evolved into an organization that is making nationally renowned progress in working to eliminate the problem. Catherine Campbell is the Executive Director of the California Protective Parent Association (CPPA), a group which has created awareness through research and education and is holding court officials accountable for decisions and behaviors that are harming children. As a protective parent with a marketing & communications background Campbell is at the forefront of the movement. She has worked with congressional members on both sides of the aisles to help pass this child safety resolution in 2018 in the U.S. House of Representatives. In California she has helped build awareness to see the passing of Piqui’s Resolution (HR113), worked with Center for Judicial Excellence to bring an audit forward for the California Commission on Judicial Performance which is the first ever audit in their nearly 60 year history and meet with CA legislatures to update laws for DV and child safety. Join us as Campbell explains the organization, what necessitated its development, and how it is making an impact across the country. Airing for the first time, Saturday, November 9, at 11 AM Pacific Time, and available thereafter through the archive at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.






















RESEARCH, GEOGRAPHY AND IPV
Feb 23 2019 57 mins  
RESEARCH, GOEGRAPHY AND IPV Research is important, but so is perfecting research. Especially in the areas of Intimate Partner Violence. We usually see geographic differences (if addressed at all) as reflecting urban, suburban and rural areas. But two IPV researchers started seeing some problems with that and decided to get to the bottom of it. They sifted through the National Crime Victimization Survey data to better understand how settlement types impacts the type of violence against women. What they found is that using three geographic designations only gives a very imperfect reflection of violence against women. Kathryn DuBois is an Associate Professor at Washington State University Vancouver. Beginning with research toward a Ph.D. in Criminology from Simon Fraser University on alcohol and violence among the Inuit of the eastern Canadian arctic, and has developed expertise in several areas including victimology, violence against women, rural violence, and public health approaches to alcohol regulation. Callie Marie Rennison earned her Ph.D. in 1997 in political science from the University of Houston, University Park, where she also received a B.S. in psychology, M.A. in sociology, and M.A. in political science. In 2016, she was awarded the Bonnie S. Fisher Victimology Career Award from the Division of Victimology in the American Society of Criminology. She has also served on a National Academies Committee examining domestic sex trafficking of minors in the United States and was a Senior Researcher at the Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics. Join us as Rennison and DuBois share the findings from their research and how those findings can change our understanding of violence against women.










PTSD, DISABILITIES AND THE COURTS: EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL?
Dec 08 2018 60 mins  
This special episode is being repreated in honor of Dr. Karin Huffer, friend, teacher, scholar, author, and tireless advocate for those who suffer at the hands of the courts. Thank you, Karin. Rest in peace. PTSD, DISABILITIES AND THE COURTS: EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL? Did you know that as many as 85% of women who experience Intimate Partner Violence have PTSD? Some studies say a little less, but no matter which study you read, the numbers are alarming. Did you know that in courts a person with PTSD or other disability is often accused of being “crazy,” or lying to manipulate the court rather than being recognized as a person with a disability? Just because some disabilities are not visible doesn’t mean they are not included under federal regulations. People with PTSD may qualify for taking breaks in the proceedings, may be able to get extensions on deadlines, may be able to testify in court from a safe room or even on the phone. Courts are mandated to accommodate to ensure equal access to the justice system, but how can we get them to do it? Dr. Karin Huffer is doing something about that. Dr. Huffer is an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, and knows plenty about the law, disability accommodation, and domestic violence. She is starting a program at John Jay to teach people how to be advocates for those whose disabilities are exploited and not accommodated in court, even when those people are representing themselves. Learn more about what an Equal Access Advocate can do, how to learn to be one and get one, and find how this whole thing can work to help women deal with and get their rights in courts. Join us Saturday with Dr. Karin Huffer and information about equal access and the courts.



















CUSTODY COURTS: INTENTIONAL BIAS?
Jun 30 2018 56 mins  
CUSTODY COURTS: INTENTIONAL BIAS? Study after study is showing perfectly good mothers losing custody of their kids, often to fathers who have been abusive or who don’t want to pay child support. Some advocates and experts say it’s a problem with educating judges. But what if it’s more intentional than that? One group believes these custody nightmares are happening on purpose and that something must be done now. The Women’s Coalition International thinks the problems would be eased by requiring child custody cases to be heard by juries. Cindy Dumas is the founder and Executive Director of The Women’s Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to raising awareness and ending the epidemic of women’s children being taken away from. Her son, Damon Dumas, was sexually abused by his father for years, and when the Family Court system wouldn't hear his cries for help, he started a decade-long struggle to free himself from his father's control. He is now the Communications Director of The Women's Coalition and is a recipient of the Courageous Kids Network Medal of Courage Patricia Barry is a former attorney who practiced for 41-1/2 years in California courts and in numerous federal courts throughout the country. She argued and won a sexual harassment case which ended up as the first sexual harassment case in the U. S. Supreme Court. She represented protective mothers losing custody to abusive fathers in family courts. All three join us to talk about the custody problems and their suggestions for a solution. Airing for the first time Saturday, June 30, at 11 AM Pacific Time, and available thereafter through the archive at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.











HELPING ABUSE VICTIMS THE D.A.D WAY
Apr 14 2018 59 mins  
HELPING ABUSE VICTIMS THE D.A.D WAY “Get a lawyer!” “Call the police!” “Just leave!” All reasonable advice for a woman who is living with abuse, but it’s usually a lot harder than it sounds. Since some of the hallmarks of intimate partner abuse are isolation, intimidation, coercion and financial dependency, women who are trying to get away and get safe often find themselves all alone and powerless in the face of their abusers. And that means they are often in danger, or that they must stay or go back to the abusive man. One ex-cop and process server saw his share of these scenarios and decided to help. Now there is a core group of men in Virginia who make themselves ready, willing and able to provide physical support for the women who find themselves alone and afraid. Trey Gregory was a police officer in the US Air Force as well as in the Roanoke City Police Department and is a graduate of the Cardinal Criminal Justice Academy, USAF. He started Domestic Abuse Disruption, Inc., an organization that helps abuse victims relocate, assists with stalker situations, provides escorts to court and is certified to assess the lethality of an abuse situation. That’s a lot of help for women who think they are alone. Join us as Trey talks about DAD, the folks who volunteer to help abuse victims, and how this and similar organizations are helping those who feel helpless. First airing on Saturday, April14, at 11 AM Pacific Time, and available thereafter through the archive at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.











HOW FAMILY COURTS TREAT ABUSE AND ACCUSATIONS OF ALIENATION
Jan 27 2018 57 mins  
HOW FAMILY COURTS TREAT ABUSE AND ACCUSATIONS OF ALIENATION Some divorcing fathers say family courts are prejudiced against them when it comes to deciding child custody. Some divorcing mothers say they are punished when they reveal violence and sexual abuse, especially of the children. Judges say they are fair and equitable always. But are they? Some research has been revealing evidence that should make us all leery of custody decisions. One brand new study found some astounding information, and one of the authors will let us in on what she discovered. Joan S. Meier is a professor of Clinical Law at George Washington University Law School, and Founder and Legal Director of the Domestic Violence Legal Empowerment and Appeals Project (DV LEAP). She is a nationally recognized expert on domestic violence and the law, appellate litigation, and clinical law teaching and has founded programs to provide legal representation, advocacy, and counseling to victims of domestic violence. Professor Meier has co-written several significant pieces of federal and state legislation, and frequently delivers presentations and trainings to attorneys, judges, and professional organizations. Join us as she talks about what her hot-off-the-presses research study reveals about how judges in family court made decisions about child custody when there are allegations of abuse and alienation. Go to the website at 11 AM Pacific Time, to hear the show as it first airs, and go anytime to listen this or all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.













GENDER AND THE LAW
Nov 02 2017 60 mins  
Katharine T. Bartlett, A. Kenneth Pye Professor of Law, served as Dean of Duke Law School from 2000-2007. She teaches family law, employment discrimination law, gender and law, and contracts, and publishes widely in the fields of family law, gender theory, employment law, theories of social change, and legal education. She has the leading casebook (with Deborah Rhode) in the area of gender law. Professor Bartlett served as a reporter for the American Law Institute's Principles of the Law of Family Dissolution (2002), for which she was responsible for the provisions relating to child custody. For her work on this project, she was named R. Ammi Cutter Chair in 1998. Professor Bartlett earned her degrees at Wheaton College, Harvard University, and the University of California at Berkeley. Before coming to Duke, she was a law clerk on the California Supreme Court and a legal services attorney in Oakland, California. She has been a visiting professor at UCLA and at Boston University, a scholar in residence at New York University School of Law and Columbia Law School, and a fellow at the National Humanities Center in Research Triangle Park, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. Professor Bartlett has received numerous honors over the years. In 1994, she won the University Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award at Duke University. She was awarded Equal Justice Works' Dean John R. Kramer Award (“Dean of the Year”) for “leadership in public service in legal education” in 2006 and received an honorary doctorate from Wheaton College in 2008








THE SAFE CHILD ACT
Sep 09 2017 58 mins  
THE SAFE CHILD ACT Would you be surprised to know that there is no law that says a judge has to make a kid’s health and safety the first priority when determining custody in a divorce? Every day judges decide where a child will live when the parents divorce. It’s always a tough decision, and most people make the most of it because they care about their kids. Often they get it wrong, with disastrous results. And those children may be forced to live with someone who has abused or sexually assaulted them. Andrew Willis, founder of the Stop Abuse Campaign, and Barry Goldstein, nationally recognized domestic violence author, speaker and advocate, will join us to talk about the Safe Child Act. This act, being considered by state legislatures in Hawaii, Pennsylvania, New York, Texas, Utah and Washington, would make child health and safety the first priority in determining custody. Andrew was born in Hong Kong went to school in Great Britain and has not stopped travelling ever since. Following time in the British Army, where he reached the rank of Captain, he spent his life practicing integrated marketing communications and marketing, mostly for global brands. He has been recognized with both creative and marketing effectiveness awards and is a frequent speaker at conferences. Barry Goldstein is a nationally recognized domestic violence author, speaker and advocate. He is co-chair of the child custody task group for NOMAS and serves as Director of Research for the Stop Abuse Campaign. Barry Goldstein is the author of the Safe Child Act which is a comprehensive proposal to make family courts safe for children. He is the author of 5 of the leading books about domestic violence and child custody including The Quincy Solution: Stop Domestic Violence and Save $500 Billion. Join us as we air the show for the first time on Saturday,




FINANCIAL ABUSE: ONE WOMAN’S STORY
Aug 12 2017 58 mins  
FINANCIAL ABUSE: ONE WOMAN’S STORY When most people hear the words “domestic violence,” they think of broken bones and bruises. Some people are aware that intimate partner abuse comes in many forms, from verbally degrading a partner, to isolation, to all kinds of control. One of those forms of control is financial abuse. Unless you have experienced financial abuse and control, it is really hard to grasp the impact of it. Controllers control, and they can interfere with a woman’s ability to get to work, or look for a job, or interfere with her employer or work performance until she gets fired. Sometimes abusers apply for credit cards in the victim’s name without their knowing about it; sometimes they run up huge debts, or cancel accounts or credit cards without telling the victim. And often that control continues after divorce, after kids grow up, and even when the victim has no money to gain control over. That’s what happened with Coral Anika Theill, author of “BONSHEÁ Making Light of the Dark” which has been used as a college text. She is also a contributing writer for Leatherneck Magazine and Short Rations for Marines. Her October 2011 Leatherneck Magazine article, "Invisible Battle Scars: Confronting the Stigma Associated with PTS & TBI," is cited in the U.S. Army War College "Psychological Health Notes." She is a recipient of the Lester Granger Award from the National Montford Point Marine Association and a Writer's Award from iUniverse Publishing Company. Join us as Coral tells us her story of abuse during her marriage and her continued financial abuse after her divorce.

HOW FAMILY COURTS TREAT ABUSE AND ACCUSATIONS OF ALIENATION
Aug 05 2017 57 mins  
HOW FAMILY COURTS TREAT ABUSE AND ACCUSATIONS OF ALIENATION Some divorcing fathers say family courts are prejudiced against them when it comes to deciding child custody. Some divorcing mothers say they are punished when they reveal violence and sexual abuse, especially of the children. Judges say they are fair and equitable always. But are they? Some research has been revealing evidence that should make us all leery of custody decisions. One brand new study found some astounding information, and one of the authors will let us in on what she discovered. Joan S. Meier is a professor of Clinical Law at George Washington University Law School, and Founder and Legal Director of the Domestic Violence Legal Empowerment and Appeals Project (DV LEAP). She is a nationally recognized expert on domestic violence and the law, appellate litigation, and clinical law teaching and has founded programs to provide legal representation, advocacy, and counseling to victims of domestic violence. Professor Meier has co-written several significant pieces of federal and state legislation, and frequently delivers presentations and trainings to attorneys, judges, and professional organizations. Join us as she talks about what her hot-off-the-presses research study reveals about how judges in family court made decisions about child custody when there are allegations of abuse and alienation. Go to the website at 11 AM Pacific Time, August 5, to hear the show as it first airs, and go anytime to listen this or all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.

TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR HOTEL ROOM AND HELP CATCH A SEX TRAFFICKER
Jul 29 2017 58 mins  
TAKE A PICTURE OF YOUR HOTEL ROOM AND HELP CATCH A SEX TRAFFICKER You travel to a great hotel (or a not so great one) and you snap a couple pictures to send back home to the folks. Did you know that if you send them to the Exchange Initiative, those pictures could be used as part of a massive database designed to catch sex traffickers? Turns out that about 40% of trafficking occurs inside hotels and motels. The photos can be used to locate victims, and it’s all done with an app that came out a few months ago. UNICEF has determined that at least 300,000 American kids and 1.2 million kids worldwide are trafficked and prostituted each year. Kimberly Ritter, director for development for Exchange Initiative, is a veteran of the meeting planning industry where she specializes in large event planning and where she became aware of the huge problem with human trafficking. She now works with her company and clients to educate, empower, and engage individuals and organizations with real resources to help put an end to sex trafficking. One of the ways they do that is with a Smartphone app, TRAFFICKCAM, which lets travelers capture hotel room images with their camera phone, and upload those images to a database that then enables investigators to match photos being searched online for missing children. UNICEF has determined that at least 300,000 American kids and 1.2 million kids worldwide are trafficked and prostituted each year. Join us as she shares her expertise, her knowledge and the technology being used to counteract human trafficking and learn how you can help with just your smartphone. Go to the website at 11 AM Pacific Time, July 29, to hear the show as it first airs, and go anytime to listen this or all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.







WHAT'S GOING ON IN THE FAMILY COURTS?
Jun 17 2017 62 mins  
WHAT IS GOING ON IN OUR FAMILY COURTS? Abuse through the courts, revictimization, parental alienation, women lie, children given to abusers, judges who think that just because a woman is frantic there is something wrong with her, guardians ad litem, lawyers, psychologists, and a system that arguably makes more things worse than it makes them better, So what’s going on in our family courts? Two experts who really know the experiences, the reasons, and the truth behind the crisis in the family courts join us for an in-depth look at where we are, how we got there, and what we can do about it. Barry Goldstein, co-author of “Representing the Domestic Violence Survivor,” and author of “Scared to Leave Afraid to Stay,” among other books and articles, has been an attorney, educator and expert witness in domestic violence and custody cases. His latest book, “The Quincy Solution” Stop Domestic Violence and Save $500 Billion,” details reducing domestic violence. Maralee McLean is a child advocate, protective parent, domestic violence expert, and author of PROSECUTED BUT NOT SILENCED: Courtroom Reform for Sexually Abused Children. Her work has been published in the ABA Child Law Journal, Women’s E-News and other publications on the problems of family courts not protecting abused children. Both will discuss the problems with family court and family court judges on our next show. Call in to share your opinions and questions at 646-378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

WEST MEETS EAST IN PSYCHOLOGY CARE
Jun 10 2017 61 mins  
WEST MEETS EAST IN PSYCHOLOGY CARE Depression, PTSD, bipolar disorder, fertility issues…all call for a certain drugs and treatments, right? Well, not necessarily. Although most practitioners use traditional methods to treat such problems, some are venturing into adding to the usual methods by including alternative treatments like acupuncture, homeopathy, craniosacral therapy, Chinese medicine and others in the mix when it comes to treating a variety of not only physical issues, but also psychological ones. Dr. Paula King, a general clinical psychologist, works with an organization called Healing Horizons to treat all sorts of conditions with a broad mix of traditional and alternative methods. Her background includes a doctorate in Psychology and Adult Education from Arizona State University, coaching certification from the Hudson Institute, certification as an interactive imagery guide from the Academy for Guided Imagery, a bachelor’s degree in physical education, over 25 years’ experience in a general psychology practice and 10 years as a performance specialist working with professional and amateur athletes. In addition, Dr. King authored “A Trust Walk: Mindful Golf”, and her articles have often appeared in The Arizona Republic and a variety of national magazines. Join us as we discuss new and old approaches to treating psychological conditions that plague us. Call in with your comments or questions to 646-378-0430, or post your comments to the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.





THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF FAMILY COURT ON WOMEN AND CHILDREN
May 13 2017 1 mins  
THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF FAMILY COURT ON WOMEN AND CHILDREN We know the family court experience can bring all of us to our knees emotionally, but what about economically? Most people who go through a divorce admit it can drain them financially, but going through a contentious divorce, with abuse, or custody battles thrown in, can be devastating. Is that devastation worse for women and children? Authors Maralee McLean and Penelope Bryan join us to discuss the economic impact of family court on women and children. Penelope Bryan is Dean of the Law School of Denver Sturm College of Law where she taught family law and civil procedure for nearly 20 years. Her scholarship offers a unique blend of knowledge about family law and about the psychology and social condition of women and children, particularly those ensnared in family law courts. She has written Constructive Divorce: Procedural Justice and Sociolegal Reform. Maralee, author of Prosecuted but Not Silenced: Courtroom Reform for Sexually Abused Children, has been published in the ABA Child Law Journal, Women’s E-News and other publications. She has testified before Congress about judicial accountability and is a national speaker and advocate for the protection of sexually abused children’s rights in courts. Join us as we discuss the economic impact of family courts on women and children. Call in with your comments or questions to 646-378-0430, or post your comments to the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.

GENDER, PSYCHOLOGY, AND JUSTICE: WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES WITH THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE S
May 06 2017 61 mins  
GENDER, PSYCHOLOGY, AND JUSTICE: WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES WITH THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM Women who have contact with the criminal justice system often have experiences quite different from their male counterparts. But how different? And why? Is it different in criminal courts and family courts? And what about race, class and sexual orientation – do they contribute to how a person is treated or the outcomes of courts? And what does it all mean? Finally, some researchers have looked into how gender intersects with all these factors to impact how women and girls are treated in and by the justice system. Authors Corinne C. Datchi and Julie R. Ancis collaborated in looking at not only data but personal stories to write their book, Gender, Psychology, and Justice. Ancis is Associate Vice President for Institute Diversity at the Georgia Institute of Technology. And has researched the area of multicultural competence and mental health. She is Past Chair of the Society of Counseling Psychology’s Section for the Advancement of Women. Datchi, Assistant Professor in the Professional Psychology and Family Therapy Department at Seton Hall University, is a private practice psychologist. She researches criminal justice populations. Join us as we discuss how courts make outdated assumptions that hurt women and girls from first contact to sentencing to family court decisions. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.


WHEN ACES HIGH IS A BAD THING: ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES
Apr 22 2017 61 mins  
WHEN ACES HIGH IS A BAD THING: ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES There was a time when people believed that children are resilient and that if something bad happened to them, they would just be able to adapt and grow up and get on with their lives. Besides, there weren’t that many traumatic things that could happen to kids anyway. Then the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study revealed a major problem with that thinking. Turns out there are multiple traumatic experiences that can and frequently do, happen to children and they commonly lead to adults with mental problems, chronic diseases, and who are victimized and victimizers. In the nearly 20 years since the ACE Study came out, how has the information been used and adapted; how have policies changed; and do we see courts, institutions, organizations, and therapists who have changed policies and procedures because of this astounding research? Vincent J. Felitti, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Senior Editor of the Permanente Journal, advisor to numerous professional organizations and associations, and one of the two principal investigators of the ACE study will share with us how the study came about, what it revealed, and how it has or has not changed the way we care for children. Joining him will be Jane Ellen Stevens, founder and publisher of the ACEs Connection Network, focus on research about adverse childhood experiences, and how people are implementing trauma-informed and resilience-building practices based on that research. Join us as we discuss the ACE Study and what it means. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.







SHE’S THE CRAZY ONE: HOW ABUSERS DANCE WITH MENTAL HEALTH
Mar 11 2017 61 mins  
SHE’S THE CRAZY ONE: HOW ABUSERS DANCE WITH MENTAL HEALTH Mental health professionals are a valued and necessary part of our world and they can do a lot of good. But what happens when the idea of mental health, mental illness, and even the professionals who help us, are used and exploited to make things worse for those victimized by domestic violence? Rachel Graber has worked in human services for seven years as a school counselor, an intern at Meskwaki Child and Victims Services, and a public policy intern at the Women’s Resource and Action Center. She leads the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence legislative affairs in Washington, DC. She sits on the National Task Force to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, a national public policy collaboration between violence against women organizations, organizes NCADV Congressional briefings and legislative events, lobbies Congress on issues related to gender based violence, and helps mobilize efforts to influence national legislation aimed at protecting and providing safe alternatives for victims of domestic violence. And she knows that exploiting mental health resources and professionals is often a way abusers control, win, and further victimize others. Join us as we talk about how a perpetrator can use and abuse mental health resources, definitions, and perceptions. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.



SPIRITUALITY AND TRAUMA: THE LINK THAT MAY BE OVERLOOKED
Feb 18 2017 60 mins  
SPIRITUALITY AND TRAUMA: THE LINK THAT MAY BE OVERLOOKED There are many ways to help survivors, from medication to visualization to just being there. But for those who have experienced trauma, many of these approaches may be missing the boat when it comes to helping survivors make sense of their pain. A new book, “Trauma, Meaning, and Spirituality: Translating Research into Clinical Practice,” may offer a different perspective. Authors Crystal Park, PhD, and Joseph Currier, PhD, say that there is a relationship between trauma and spirituality that can help not only with assessment of survivors, but also with treatment. Park, with the University of Connecticut Department of Psychology, has done extensive research on the multiple aspects of coping with stressful events, and what brings meaning to those events for survivors. Currier is Assistant Professor and Director of Clinical Training in the Combined Clinical & Counseling Psychology Doctoral Program at the University of South Alabama. His research focuses on psychological, spiritual/existential, and physical health consequences of military trauma and other stressful life events. Join us as we discuss the link between spirituality and trauma. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.




WHAT ARE WE DOING ABOUT THE PROBLEM WITH FAMILY COURT?
Jan 28 2017 61 mins  
WHAT ARE WE DOING ABOUT THE PROBLEM WITH FAMILY COURT? The court tells you their father must see your kids, but CPS tells you they will take away the kids if you don’t protect them from him. His lawyers say you are alienating the children because they don’t want to go see their dad. The judge says you are just being hostile when you say the kids are afraid of him. The kids cry and ask you to help them. Your friends and neighbors want to know what you did wrong and why you are being so nasty to your ex. Sound like a soap opera? Well, it’s a soap opera thousands of women face every day dealing with family court. The traps, the fears, the frustrations and the anguish protective parents and children often face in family courts are situations advocates and experts alike continue to see and continue to try to remedy. But how? Hear how individuals and organizations are taking different approaches to tackle the problems with custody and family courts. Maralee McLean is a child advocate and domestic violence expert, who authored “Prosecuted but Not Silenced: Courtroom Reform for Sexually Abused Children. She has written for ABA Child Law Journal, Women’s E-News, and other publications on the problems of family courts not protecting abused children, and has appeared on national television shows and other venues to help bring the message of what is happening in family courts to the public. She will join us as we talk about the traps, the dangers, the hostilities and the anguish for protective mothers and what they are doing about it. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.


FUNNY WOMEN: HUMOR AND THE X CHROMOSOME
Jan 14 2017 60 mins  
FUNNY WOMEN: HUMOR AND THE X CHROMOSOME Did you ever notice that men laugh at the Three Stooges more than women? Or that mrn say they want a woman with a sense of humor, but what they're really saying is that they want a woman who will laugh at their jokes? Preferably while her boobs are jiggling. Is there women’s humor? And what about all those women who make a living (or try to) of pointing out the laughable moments in all our lives? Is the business of humor funny? And is it different for the guys and the gals? Veteran comedians Peggy Platt and Kristen Kirkham dish about their careers, the challenges for women in the business of being funny, and what makes us laugh. Peggy Platt, the “Reigning Queen of Seattle Comedy,” has plied her trade as a noted performer, comedian, teacher, and artist in the Pacific Northwest. She is a winner of the Seattle Comedy Competition, a prolific author of full-length plays, and has toured with her stage shows all over the world, not to mention exotic locals like Indianapolis. Kristen Kirkham started her comedy career working with Robin William's improv group in San Francisco, where the already recognized Williams, an accomplished comedy star, would often drop by unexpectedly to perform. She has performed varied comedy in numerous venues all over the world, but settled in Seattle to round out her career doing standup. Join us as these women of comedy share experiences and insights into women and comedy. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.


WHAT’S FAITH GOT TO DO WITH IT? CHURCHES, SPIRITUALITY AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIO
Dec 31 2016 60 mins  
WHAT’S FAITH GOT TO DO WITH IT? CHURCHES, SPIRITUALITY AND INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE The number of women who first go to their clergy person seeking help for domestic violence is overwhelming. But what happens when they go there? Is there help, support, coercion, denial? Some research shows that many cleric beliefs gets in the way of helping victims, and very few religious leaders even get any education about intimate violence. So does religion help, hurt or frustrate those who see assistance for abuse? Carolyn Scott Brown is Director of Learning and Resources for FaithTrust Institute. Her primary responsibilities include helping faith and community organizations develop a combination of resources and training services to achieve their organizational goals in prevention and intervention for domestic & sexual violence, child abuse, teen dating violence and ministerial misconduct. She also consults with both national and local community organizations as they partner with faith communities to respond effectively to domestic and sexual violence. Carolyn will help us understand the cleric and religious response to domestic violence, how it can improve, and what we can do about it. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.











AUDRIE & DAISY: THE FILM AND THE STORY OF TEEN SEXUAL ASSAULT
Oct 15 2016 61 mins  
AUDRIE & DAISY: THE FILM AND THE STORY OF TEEN SEXUAL ASSAULT We read about it every week – a teenage girl sexually assaulted by classmates or neighbor boys, and what happens next is more horrible than the physical violence. What happens next in so many of these cases, is the girl is bullied, ridiculed, and slut shamed, and if she dares to report it to police, she is often the butt of community-wide derision, victim blaming, and campaigns to trivialize what happened and to discredit her. In Delaney Henderson’s case, her rape became national news, a rap artist made a song out of it that even threatened her life, and she made the decision to use her experience to do some good. She not only reported her assault, she sued the rap artist, she started an organization to support victims like her, AND she was instrumental in making a new documentary featured on Netflix called Audrie & Daisy. The film is a testament to the girls who live through this experience and those who do not. Join Delaney, Daisy and Jada Smith (who also appears in the film) as we talk about their experiences, the film, and the prevalence of sexual assault and its despicable follow up for teenage girls. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.





CLEOPATRA AND YOU: MORE IN COMMON THAN YOU THINK?
Sep 10 2016 60 mins  
CLEOPATRA AND YOU: MORE IN COMMON THAN YOU THINK? We’ve all seen the movies of Egyptian ancients and how they treated their women, and we all are thankful we live in an era that is kinder to us, right? Well, maybe not. Is there something we can learn about those women of the past and their day to day lives that might help us as we look at where we are now in our culture and our struggles? You might be surprised. Professor Janet H. Johnson, professor of Egyptology in the Oriental Institute and department of Near Eastern languages and civilizations at the University of Chicago and Professor Cynthia Shawamreh, Senior Counsel for the City of Chicago’s Department of Law, Finance and Economic Development Division, will join us to discuss women in ancient Egypt and how their lives can inform our lives in the modern world. Dr. Johnson’s interests include Egypt in the 1st Millennium B.C., and she has written about private property, marriage and inheritance, and gender and marriage in ancient Egypt. Ms Shawamreh Ms. Shawamreh served as the co-chair of the Subcommittee on Hate Crime and Discrimination against Religious Institutions for the Illinois Advisory Committee of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. She also brings a rich personal history to the conversation from her experience as a Jew who is married to a Muslim. It’s a different conversation, but one that just may enrich your understanding of women across the ages. Join us as we discuss the social, economic, legal, and sexual status of women in ancient Egypt and how it fits with European and American women of today. Call in with your comments to 646-378-0430, or post your comments and questions in the chat room. Live at 11 AM Pacific time, or go to the website anytime to listen to all our archived programs at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways







I'M SORRY: TALKING WHILE FEMALE
Jul 30 2016 60 mins  
"I'm sorry," "I'm no expert, but...," "I think." You know you've used them. The qualifiers and minimizers women learn to use when talking so we don't sound bossy or pushy. While we may have come a long way in careers and money, is it possible that we haven't come far at all in equalizing the language we use in our relationships and our careers? Is there a female way to speak? And does it really matter? Some studies have shown that men and women use different language, but it is much more complicated. Several factors, including the conversation topic and characteristics of the communication partner influence our language choices. Knowing if, how, and when men and women use and understand language differently may improve how you communicate your intentions. Adrienne B. Hancock, PhD is coauthor of a study, "Influence of Communication Partner's Gender on Language." She is an associate profesor at George Washington University's Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, and she knows how gender is involved in language, voice, and communication. Her research aims to identify what will help transgendered people be perceived as their genuine gender. Central to this agenda are Dr. Hancock's investigations of the communication differences between cisgender men and women. She found out from her studies about interrupting, self-references, justifiers, fillers, and tag questions. Join us as we explore gender, language, and how men and women talk and are perceived.


CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: THE HISTORY,THE REALITY, AND THE HOPE
Jul 16 2016 61 mins  
CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE: THE HISTORY,THE REALITY, AND THE HOPE Think child sexual abuse is something that only happens to once in a while? That it couldn’t affect your life? Think again. It’s time to drag this silent issue out of the closet and learn exactly how prevalent it is and exactly what is being done about it. Find out what the signs of abuse are, what to do if your child or someone you know is being abused. And what about all those sex offender registries? And what about all the adults we encounter every day who lived through abuse? One man who knows the answers to these questions will join us Saturday as we discuss this sad, overwhelming and necessary topic. Eric Jones is the Survivor Support Director for Restore Hope, a Portland area nonprofit with the mission to protect children of all ages from sexual abuse and help adult survivors heal from their trauma. He is himself a survivor and believes all adults have a collective responsibility to keep everybody’s children safe from the many abuse perpetrators hiding in plain sight in today’s society. He says that advocating for child sexual abuse prevention and survivor support is the most satisfying and rewarding work of his life Jones has authored a book of hope for survivors, entitled “My Climb to Healing from Child Sexual Abuse: A Survivor’s Perspective.” The paperback and e-book version will be released later this year. Join us as we discuss child sexual abuse – the history, the reality, and the hope. Call-in with your comments to 646-378-0430. Live at 11 AM Pacific Time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

KIDS REFUSE TO SEE DAD? SEND ‘EM TO JAIL, ACCORDING TO ONE JUDGE
Jul 02 2016 61 mins  
KIDS REFUSE TO SEE DAD? SEND ‘EM TO JAIL, ACCORDING TO ONE JUDGE Juvenile detention facilities are for the junior criminals in our society, right? A place to send the bad kids who are too young for prison, you might assume. But what if you knew of three nice kids, good in school, never in any trouble, who got sent to kiddie jail because they refused to meet with the father they say is abusive? That’s what happened to three Michigan youngsters, 15, 10, and 9 when a judge said they were in contempt of court for not spending time with the dad the kids say was violent. The judge, however, said the father was a great man, and sentenced the children to a facility until they changed their minds about seeing him. And by the way, the judge ordered the kids be kept apart, and prohibited their mother from seeing them. Investigative journalist Michael Volpe's work has been in publications from the Washington Examiner, Crime Magazine, and numerous others. He has published articles on family court in six different media sources including simultaneous investigations in Rockland County New York, Oakland County Michigan, and in Connecticut. He's the author of three books- Prosecutors Gone Wild, The Definitive Dossier of PTSD in Whistleblowers, and Bullied to Death: Chris Mackney's Kafkaesque Divorce. He investigated the Michigan case, and will fill us in on their situation, whether it is truly unusual, and how and why a judge makes such decisions. Find out what has transpired for these kids and their mother since their sentencing. Call-in with your comments to 646-378-0430. Live at 11 AM Pacific Time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

PTSD, DISABILITIES AND THE COURTS: EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL?
Jun 25 2016 61 mins  
PTSD, DISABILITIES AND THE COURTS: EQUAL ACCESS FOR ALL? Did you know that as many as 85% of women who experience Intimate Partner Violence have PTSD? Some studies say a little less, but no matter which study you read, the numbers are alarming. Did you know that in courts a person with PTSD or other disability is often accused of being “crazy,” or lying to manipulate the court rather than being recognized as a person with a disability? Just because some disabilities are not visible doesn’t mean they are not included under federal regulations. People with PTSD may qualify for taking breaks in the proceedings, may be able to get extensions on deadlines, may be able to testify in court from a safe room or even on the phone. Courts are mandated to accommodate to ensure equal access to the justice system, but how can we get them to do it? Dr. Karin Huffer is doing something about that. Dr. Huffer is an adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, and knows plenty about the law, disability accommodation, and domestic violence. She is starting a program at John Jay to teach people how to be advocates for those whose disabilities are exploited and not accommodated in court, even when those people are representing themselves. Learn more about what an Equal Access Advocate can do, how to learn to be one and get one, and find how this whole thing can work to help women deal with and get their rights in courts. Join us Saturday with Dr. Karin Huffer and information about equal access and the courts. Call-in with your comments to 646-378-0430. Live at 11 AM Pacific Time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER RAPE, ANOTHER SLAP ON THE WRIST An Olympic caliber swimmer,
Jun 11 2016 61 mins  
ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER RAPE, ANOTHER SLAP ON THE WRIST An Olympic caliber swimmer, a college student, a Stanford man…a rapist…a slap on the hand…all make for headlines and outrage. But maybe the overarching outrage over the Brock Turner story should be for how often this happens. How many times this story is repeated, how many times there isn’t even a slap on the hand, could be the real story here. Add in the letter the father of the rapist wrote to a judge trying to make the case for how difficult the whole situation is for his son, and you have just one more verse of a song that is sung in court rooms all over the country, every single day. We have two experts on the show this week to talk about the Turner case and why it is a typical situation, not an unusual one. Ebony Tucker is the Advocacy Director for the National Alliance to End Sexual Violence. Before that, she directed the Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault helping to develop anti-sexual assault initiatives, and as the Associate Executive Director and Legal Assistance for Victims (LAV) Project Director at the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence. Casey Gwinn is the former elected San Diego City Attorney where he created one of the leading domestic violence inits in America and then wnet on to found the first Family Justice Center in the United States. Today, he serves as the President of Alliance for HOPE Internationsl and leads the rapidly expanding Family Justice Center movement and Camp HOPE America, the largest evidence-based camping program in the country for children impacted by domestic violence. He was recently named one of Womens eNews 21 Leaders for the 21st Century Join us as we discuss the Brock Turner case through a larger lens.



GENDER AND JUDGING: WOMEN ON THE BENCH
May 21 2016 31 mins  
GENDER AND JUDGING: WOMEN ON THE BENCH Does it matter if you go before a male or a female judge? Do they make different decisions? And here’s an easy one: are there more men judges or women judges? Twenty years ago, pundits explained the low numbers of women on the bench by pointing out the low numbers of female law school grads. That explanation no longer holds water. So where are the women judges, and why should we care? Dr. Sally Kenney is the co-founder and co-chair of the Law And Society’s Collaborative Research Network on Women Judges, and has researched gender and judging, judicial selection, feminist social movements, women and electoral politics, the European Court of Justice, exclusionary employment policies, and pregnancy discrimination. Her most recent book, Gender and Justice: Why Women in the Judiciary Really Matter, was published by Routledge Press in 2013. She has worked closely with the academic network of the National Association of Women Judges and in 2013, she received the National Association of Women Judges Florence Murray Award. She has also conducted trainings for judges in Tbilisi, Georgia and Nairobi, Kenya, as well as throughout the United States. She also is a founder of the Infinity Project, an organization that works to increase gender diversity of federal judges. Join us as we talk gender and judging with Dr. Sally Kenney. Call-in with your comments to 646-378-0430. Live at 11 AM Pacific Time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways




DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, HONOR CRIMES, AND IMMIGRANT WOMEN: THE COMMON FACTOR
Apr 23 2016 61 mins  
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, HONOR CRIMES, AND IMMIGRANT WOMEN: THE COMMON FACTOR Domestic violence in the US, honor crimes in those “other” countries: are they really so different? And what can this mean for women who immigrate to the US and have experienced both? What are the connections, what are the commonalities, and what are the realities for women of all cultures when it comes to victimization by intimate partners? Jessica Winegar says the 18,000 women killed by abusers in the US between 2003 and 2014 are no different from the women killed in the Middle East or South Asia. She is the Harold H. and Virginia Anderson Chair in Anthropology at Northwestern University. Her research specialization is in the Middle East, and she has written widely on issues of gender, Islam, and global politics. Penny Venetis is Executive Vice President and Legal Director of Legal Momentum and as Clinical Professor of Law, and Director of the International Human Rights Clinic, at Rutgers, she specialized in civil rights and international human rights impact litigation. She instituted women’s rights projects in the Rutgers Law School clinics, developed human trafficking advocacy projects, and recruited and supervised pro bono attorneys from major law firms to work on the Clinic’s landmark cases. Join us as we discuss domestic violence, honor crimes, cultural similarities and differences, and the realities for women who are victimized. Call in to share your opinions and questions at 646-378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

INCEST IN AMERICAN HISTORY: IT'S A VERY COMPLICATED HISTORY
Apr 16 2016 60 mins  
When doctors discovered that gonorrhea affected all classes of girls back in the late 19th Century, they dismissed any evidence about the transmission of the disease from fathers to daughters, and instead blamed --you guessed it-- women for the spread of the disease. It was poor housekeeping, not daddy dearest, accounting for the STD/ Author Lynn Sacco, assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Tennessee wrote "Unspeakable: Father - Daughter Incest in American History," to explore the role of medicine and society in detecting and dealing wiht incest historically, and she reseearched how the experts threw scientific knowledge to the winds rather than face the issue of father- daughter incest. Easier to blame the mothers than to face a harsh reality. Sacco has documented medical history and social attitudes about incest and sex crimes over the last two hundred years and how the problem was ignored in order to sustain an image of the ideal white family and paternal authority. Prof. Sacco earned degrees in journalism and English from Marquette University, a lwa degree from John Marshall Law School and practiced law for several years in Chicago. She went on to get a doctorate in history from the University of Southern Californie, and has been with the University of Tennessee history department since 2004. Join us as we talk about the history if incest, medicine, feminism, society and sexuality in America.





JUDGES AND LAWYERS AND SHRINKS, OH MY: THE PEOPLE INVOLVED IN FAMILY COURT CONFL
Mar 19 2016 61 mins  
There are judges, guardians, lawyers, arbitrators, psychologists, advocates, mediators, child protection services, social workers, and more who all can be involved when there is a divorce or litigation in family courts across the country. Who are these people? What do they do? How expert are they? What do they know about intimate partner violence? Who do they represent? What do they cost? Do they help or hurt? And how can they impact decisions like child custody? There have been studies of the situations with these ancillary court personnel, and there is pracitcal experience about them. Richard Ducote joins us for a discussion about al the people who make up cases and decisions in family court. Ducote has represented hundreds of abused children over the last 30 years of his law practice. In the 1980's he began reoresenting victims of sexual abuse and domestic violence focusing on cases where courts had awarded custody of children to molesters and violence perpetrators. He is an ardent opponent of the so-called Parental Alienation Syndrome often used by abusers to gain visitation or custody of children in domestic violence cases. That opposition led to his participation in cases in 44 different states as well as to appearances on Oprah, 60 minutes, Good Morning Britain, and Leeza. He has been interviewed and quoted in Parade Magazine, Good Housekeeping, Money, and the National Law Journal. His expertise is profound, his awards numerous, and his knowledge about gamily court abuses is extensive. Join us as we talk about the population of victims, perpetrators, personnel, decision makers, and others involved in teh drama that is family court.


WHAT'S GOING ON IN OUR FAMILY COURTS?
Mar 05 2016 60 mins  
WHAT IS GOING ON IN OUR FAMILY COURTS? Abuse through the courts, revictimization, parental alienation, women lie, children given to abusers, judges who think that just because a woman is frantic there is something wrong with her, guardians ad litem, lawyers, psychologists, and a system that arguably makes more things worse than it makes them better, So what’s going on in our family courts? Two experts who really know the experiences, the reasons, and the truth behind the crisis in the family courts join us for an in-depth look at where we are, how we got there, and what we can do about it. Barry Goldstein, co-author of “Representing the Domestic Violence Survivor,” and author of “Scared to Leave Afraid to Stay,” among other books and articles, has been an attorney, educator and expert witness in domestic violence and custody cases. His latest book, “The Quincy Solution” Stop Domestic Violence and Save $500 Billion,” details reducing domestic violence. Maralee McLean is a child advocate, protective parent, domestic violence expert, and author of PROSECUTED BUT NOT SILENCED: Courtroom Reform for Sexually Abused Children. Her work has been published in the ABA Child Law Journal, Women’s E-News and other publications on the problems of family courts not protecting abused children. Both will discuss the problems with family court and family court judges on our next show. Call in to share your opinions and questions at 646-378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways



FAMILY COURT RESPONSES TO INCEST AND SEXUAL ABUSE IN CUSTODY DISPUTES
Feb 13 2016 60 mins  
FAMILY COURT RESPONSES TO INCEST AND SEXUAL ABUSE IN CUSTODY DISPUTES The Boston Globe just ran a story about a little girl who, for five years, was forced by the courts to live with the father who she said was sexually abusing her. The girl’s mother believed the child, and took her to the doctor, then to the psychologist, and everyone believed the girl. Then they got to the courts and that’s where the child’s life hit a very sad bottom. Even sadder: this is happening all the time. Thousands of times. Thousands of children. What is going on with a court system that forces children to be exposed and at risk by those who are abusing them? Maralee McLean is a child advocate, protective parent, domestic violence expert, and author of PROSECUTED BUT NOT SILENCED: Courtroom Reform for Sexually Abused Children. Her work has been published in the ABA Child Law Journal, Women’s E-News and other publications on the problems of family courts not protecting abused children. She organized a National Rally of Mothers at the Colorado State Capitol and has been involved in legislative work that spans over two decades. She testified before Congress to promote judicial accountability to better protect sexually abused children’s rights in our courts. Maralee’s story has been covered by many media outlets and internationally on CNN. Join us as we talk about the courts’ response to sexual abuse of children in custody disputes. Call in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways



PRETTY IS AS PRETTY GETS: DO ATTRACTIVE WOMEN GET BETTER GRADES?
Jan 16 2016 61 mins  
PRETTY IS AS PRETTY GETS: DO ATTRACTIVE WOMEN GET BETTER GRADES? I was a good student, I was good at soccer, I was vice president of the student council, I was a pretty girl. Evangeline Lilly Lilly doesn’t mention her grades, but if her experience is typical of that found in a recent study, she probably got higher marks than her less attractive female friends. Yep – pretty girls get better grades, according to an economics professor’s study of more than 5,000 college women. And it didn’t make a difference whether the grader was male or female. So what does this mean? Not only does this have implications from an academic point of view, but also from a social point of view. Does it diminish the all A’s the class knock out got? Does it make a difference to the less attractive woman who is working hard for those A’s? Or does it really change anything now that we know it happens? Rey Hernandez-Julian is an associate professor of economics at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, and he likes to use his economics lens to examine education. His previous research has included looks at how athletic achievement and course scheduling affect student performance in college, and he’s studied the relationship between school choice and outcomes outside of school. His PhD in applied Economics is from Clemson University. Join us as we look at appearance and grades for women. Call in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways



MISUSE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE IN CUSTODY LITIGATION
Dec 19 2015 61 mins  
MISUSE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE IN CUSTODY LITIGATION Do you know that the Leadership Council estimates nearly 60,000 kids a year are forced by the courts to be with an unsafe parent? One article in Family and Intimate Partner Violence Quarterly (spring 2013) reported 175 documented cases of kids killed by their fathers after the court disregarded their mothers’ concerns about safety for children – and that was in just a two year period! So what’s up with the courts? How can this happen? One reason is that the courts are using junk science and a skewed idea of “fairness” in determining child custody. One researcher found that courts often misuse psychological science in custody litigation. And instead of recognizing what can be dangerous to children, family courts see themselves as fair and balanced and those concerned with abuse as ideologues with an ax to grind. The losers? As usual, it’s the children. Joan Meier, attorney and Professor of Clinical Law AT George Washington University is a nationally recognized expert on domestic violence and the law, appellate litigation and clinical law education. She founded several interdisciplinary domestic violence clinical programs, which have been recognized by the US Department of Justice as models for such organizations. She trains attorneys, judges and other court professionals and was awarded the Cahn Award from the National Equal Justice Library. Join us as we explore her research and the startling findings about how courts can disregard danger for children and use junk science in determining child custody, often times to the detriment and danger of the children involved.













THE NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE: WHAT'S IT DO AND WHO CALLS IT?
Sep 19 2015 61 mins  
THE NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE: WHERE’S IT LOCATED, WHEN DID IT START, AND WHAT DOES IT DO? For years, there’s been a telephone number in Texas that anyone who needs information about domestic violence can call. It’s become the one resource that clinics, shelters, women’s organizations and advocates can post in notices, put on rest room doors, and print on the back of brochures. It has consistently been the go-to number that is the first stop for victims throughout the nation to use when they are seeking help or information about DV. This Saturday we are fortunate to have three people who know the Domestic Violence hotline number and organization intimately, and can tell us who calls, what happens when they do, and how this simple phone number has been a godsend for decades. Cameka Crawford is the Chief Communications officer at the National Domestic Violence Hotline and its youth-focused program, loveisrespect. Brian Pinero, Chief Programs Officer at the NDVH, and former guest on the show will join us as will Whitney Laas, who oversees the daily operations of The Hotline and loveisrespect's 24/7 crisis chat lines and text messaging service. No one knows more about the history, functioning, and benefits of the national hotline like these three. Please join us Saturday to learn more about the national hotline and the kinds of calls that come in each day, and the lasting good a simple phone number can do Call-in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


ARE WE ACCIDENTALLY POISONING LITTLE KIDS WITH MARIJUANA?
Sep 12 2015 61 mins  
LEGAL MARIJUANA IS ONE THING FOR ADULTS, BUT ARE WE ACCIDENTALLY POISONING LITTLE KIDS? Lots of folks are happy marijuana is legal in a lot of states, but there may be fallout no one thinks about. King County, Washington recently published a report that showed an increasing number of people, especially children, are accidentally eating and getting sick from it. Colorado reported that since marijuana was legalized there have been at least a dozen kids poisoned when they ate it. And it’s not just marijuana – kids get their hands on alcohol, Tylenol, aspirin—and lots of stuff that is fine for adults, but terrible for them. Join us as Dr. Alexander Garrard, Clinical Managing Director of the Washington Poison Center tells us about what’s happening with kids and substances and poisoning. He provides clinical management direction and leadership to the Washington Poison Center, and is also a Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Washington, School of Pharmacy. Prior to this position he worked as a health scientist in the Division of Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) in the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And he sees accidental poisoning among children way too often. Please join us Saturday to learn more about what’s happening with kids and accidental poisoning. Call-in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

WHO ARE THE RAPISTS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES?
Sep 05 2015 60 mins  
WHO ARE THE RAPISTS ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES? Are there a few men on college men who perpetrate most of the rape there? Or are there hordes of men who rape once in a while? When trying to solve the issue of sexual assault on our college campuses, it seems like it would be good to know whether we are dealing with a few serial rapists, or whether a lot of men carry out rape as isolated situations. One study looked at the information and found out who perpetrators are likely to be, and you may just be surprised. Jacquelyn W. White, PhD, is a senior research scientist at University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and is an organizer of a national group working to ensure that campus climate surveys of sexual misconduct are rooted in empirically based research. She is co-editor of the forthcoming American Psychological Association Handbook on the Psychology of Women. She has conducted research on gender issues, sexual victimization, and intimate partner violence for over 35 years, and led one of the few longitudinal studies of sexual and physical dating violence among adolescents and college students. Her work has led to information about who rapes and the consequences of campus rape. Please join us Saturday to learn more about the campus rapist. Call-in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

wOMEN, PROTECTION ORDERS, AND THE REAL COST TO VICTIMS
Aug 29 2015 61 mins  
WOMEN, PROTECTION ORDERS, AND THE REAL COSTS TO VICTIMS You’ve experienced violence from your partner, and everyone is telling you to get a protection order. Sounds right. The legal aid representative tells you how to proceed, it might help, and it doesn’t cost anything. Or does it? Two researchers looked at whether getting a protection order had any impact on women’s earnings, and their findings may be a shock. And those findings covered six years of women’s earnings. Free to get a protection order? Think again. Melanie M. Hughes and Lisa D. Brush join us to look at their research and what it told them about women’s financial picture after getting a protection order. Hughes is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh. She uses quantitative approaches to study women’s empowerment, often focusing on groups of women who are particularly marginalized. She is coauthor of Women, Politics, and Power: A Global Perspective (3rd Edition forthcoming with CQ Press). Her research has been published in journals such as American Sociological Review, American Political Science Review, and Social Forces. Brush is Professor of Sociology and of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. Her first book was Gender and Governance (Rowman and Littlefield 2003), and her second book was Poverty, Battered Women, and Work in U.S. Public Policy (Oxford University Press 2011). Her current research looks at preventing adolescent relationship abuse and teen dating violence by engaging high school and middle school boys in coached athletic programs to change masculinities.



FATHERS IN THE WORLD - WHAT'S THEIR STATUS?
Aug 08 2015 61 mins  
“Fathers’ rights” is a term bandied about on the web, in courtrooms, and in custody hearings. It’s a term often used when discussing child support and visitation. But what about fathers’ responsibilities? And what is the difference between terminology and rhetoric and what is really happening with fathers in the world? The “State of the World’s Fathers” report was launched recently after taking a long, hard look at dads everywhere, and the results are worth talking about not just in the context of divorce and child support, but in the context of raising generations and creating healthy families. So what did the report say? Ruti Levtov, Program Officer at Promundo, co-coordinates the MenCare Global Fatherhood Campaign, producers of the report. She will join us Saturday to explain the report and share some pretty surprising findings it revealed. Ruti plays a key role in Promundo's research initiatives, including the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES). Ruti previously worked with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and the Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, and was a research fellow at the Tata Institute for Social Sciences in Mumbai. She received her MA in international comparative education at Stanford University, and her PhD in public health from the University of Michigan, where her research focused primarily on gender, violence, and schooling. Please join us to learn more about the report on the status of the world’s fathers. Call-in to share your opinions and questions at (646) 378-0430. Live at 11 am Pacific time, or go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways








A PILL FOR ABORTION LANDS WOMAN IN JAIL FOR MURDER
Jun 13 2015 61 mins  
A PILL FOR ABORTION LANDS WOMAN IN JAIL FOR MURDER A Georgia woman took pills to end her pregnancy and the prosecutor charged her with murder. Huh? The 23-year old bought the pills on line that caused her to go into labor. She delivered the non-viable fetus on the way to a hospital. So what are these pills? Can anyone get them? What is the medical abortion as opposed to a surgical one? Is it legal? Can women really be jailed for taking them? Is this common in the rest of the world? Join us Saturday as Dr. Beverly Winikoff of Gynuity Health Projects joins us to talk about medical abortion and the status of medical abortion around the world. Beverly was Director for Reproductive Health at the Population Council for 25 years and worked on preventing STDs, improving postpartum care, and Safe Motherhood. She is a professor of Clinical Population and Family Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. We’ll also have Monica Simpson, Executive Director of SisterSong, a Georgia organization that works for reproductive justice among indigenous women and women of color. She has been featured in several publications as an activist and an artist and works in philanthropy and fundraising as well. Join us Saturday as we talk about the Georgia case, and others like it; what can happen to women who take matters into their own hands when it comes to reproduction; what is a medically induced abortion; drugs used to terminate pregnancy; and what’s going on in the world when it comes to reproduction. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways





ARE YOU WORKING WITH A BULLY?
May 16 2015 31 mins  
ARE YOU WORKING WITH A BULLY? Are you working with a bully? More than 25% of us are. If you aren't being bullied, chances are you have seen someone being abused by a supervisor or coworker. When we talk workplace bullying, we're talking more than some eye rolls or impatient words. Those can be off-putting, but when we talk bullying, we're talking about more than that. The eye rolls and the harsh words are often coupled with more verbal abuse, with non-verbal actions, with exclusionary actions, and they are used repeatedly. We're talking covert abuse along with overt actions perpetrated by someone who is doing it on purpose to targeted workers. Think you are the victim of workplace bullying? Gary Namie, PhD, is research director and one of the founders of the Workplace Bullying Institute. According to its website, "WBI is the first and only U.S. organization dedicated to the eradication of workplace bullying that combines help for individuals, research, books, public education, training for professionals-unions-employers, legislative advocacy, and consulting solutions for organizations. Tune in Saturday at 11 am Pacific time to hear what he has to say and to ask questions about workplace bullying and what you can do if you are targeted -- or what you should do if you are the bully. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways



THE STATES THAT ARE RESCUING RAPE KITS
Apr 25 2015 61 mins  
RAPE KITS BACKLOGGED ON SHELVES, RAPISTS FREE AS BIRDS. WHO’S DOING SOMETHING? We've all heard about the backlog of rape kits at crime facilities and police labs all across the country, and all the information locked in those kits that could be used to prosecute rapists and prevent them from raping again. The good news is that some states are actually tackling that backlog and making headway in those DNA tests - AND finding a lot of criminals. The bad news – huge backlogs still exist; it takes money to process this evidence; and some states are actually charging victims for processing and investigating via rape kits. Erika Teschke, Founder of RapeKitWA.org, started out as your everyday citizen until she read about the nationwide issue with untested rape kits. Since then she has talked with leaders at all levels of the rape kit chain of custody in Wa State and with national organizations such as the Joyful Heart’s End The Backlog in order to help bring victim centered rape kit reform to her home state. RapeKitWA. org began as an educational tool and has morphed into a community based grassroots lobbying effort that helped to both educate the public about rape kits and steer legislation through the WA State Legislature. Join us as we talk with Erika to find out what's going on with rape kits around the country with rape kits and the victims they represent. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

WHAT IS FETICIDE AND WHAT’S HAPPENING WITH WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE
Apr 18 2015 61 mins  
WHAT IS FETICIDE, WHAT’S HAPPENING WITH WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE, AND DID SOMEONE SET THE CLOCK BACK? Did you hear about the Indiana woman who had a miscarriage and was sent to jail for 40 years for “feticide?” Or the woman, also in Indiana, who attempted to commit suicide while she was pregnant and spent a year in jail for harming the baby? These aren’t isolated cases, and they aren’t all happening in Indiana. One study actually found hundreds of cases where women were arrested for doing something while pregnant that some official found harmful to their pregnancies. So what does this mean for women around the country? And what about health care in general? Has health care reform and resultant hospital mergers have an impact on women, on pregnancies, on you? Join us Saturday as we talk with Rachel Berkson, NARAL Pro-Choice Washington Executive Director. Rachel has been Associate Director of Washington Community Action Network. the Executive Director of the SEIU Washington State Council, where her primary focus was coordinating the union’s joint political and legislative programs, and from 2000 - 2006 was a lead organizer with the Working Families Party, a labor and community-based grassroots political party in New York State. Join us as we hash over what’s happening with pregnant women and politics, women’s health care, and where we are headed when it comes to women’s health in this country. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


PARTY WITH CONSENT- A MOVEMENT TO HELP END CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT
Mar 28 2015 61 mins  
PARTY WITH CONSENT- A MOVEMENT TO HELP END CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT Ever heard of “partying with consent?” If you hang around a college campus, that’s the buzz phrase that means you don’t have sex without permission. Sounds easy, right? But some people (like rapists) just aren’t getting it. What’s the deal? Jonathan Kalin, founder of “Party with Consent,” started the movement to help end sexual assault on college campuses and health masculinities. He admits that most of the efforts to help curb campus rape has led to confusion and a lot of frustration, and he’s identified three barriers to solving that problem. The idea that sexual assault is simply the result of miscommunication; the fact that there is a real communication problem surrounding sexual consent; and the contradiction of athletics. Jonathan travels the US to promote and explain the philosophy behind the Party with Consent movement. There’s no denying there is a serious sexual assault issue on campuses. Even the president launched a major campaign last fall to address the problems. So does Jonathan have the answers? Tune in Saturday at 11 am Pacific time to hear what he has to say and to ask questions about the problem and what some people are doing about it. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

A PROTECTION ORDER FOR FIDO? THIS COULD BE BIG!
Mar 21 2015 61 mins  
A PROTECTION ORDER FOR FIDO? THIS COULD BE BIG! People who know about domestic violence know how animals are often victims of abusers, and animals are often reasons women find it difficult to get away from an abusive situation. If someone says they will kill the dog if you leave, you think twice about leaving. Rep. Liz Vazquez (R) of Alaska understands how domestic violence works. She knows abusers use every trick in the book, every controlling thing they can think of to keep their victims under their thumbs. That’s why she is sponsoring Alaska HB 147. The bill would allow courts to include animals in a protective order, which means that if the protection order is violated, there are consequences for the abuser just as if he violated a protection against the human being protected. Think of the possibilities such a bill could have, not only for protecting pets, but also for helping victims and their children. Rep. Vazquez was born in New York, went to law school at Cornell, served as an administrative law judge and was an assistant attorney general and prosecutor. The first co-sponsor of the bill is Rep. Max Gruenberg (D), who has been an Alaska State representative for 20 years, a decorated veteran of the US Navy, who graduated from Stanford and the UCLA Law School. They are just two representatives at the forefront in what is a law that could have great benefits for victims of domestic violence. Join both representatives on Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to find out more about this proposed legislation, and to talk with the representatives sponsoring it. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways.


LET’S TALK WHIPS, SPANKING, LOVE, GOD AND ABUSE AND WHO’S BUYING IT
Mar 07 2015 61 mins  
So is S & M the new missionary position? With ity shades of Gray comfortably ensconced as mainstream do we think of handcuffs and riding crops with a nudge, nudge, wink, wink attitude? If a husand slaps a wife is it sexy or abusive? And when some religious folks say they have a spouse's permission to spank them in order to carry out God's direction for head of households, do we look at the hitting differently? In other words, when is it abuse, when is it fun, and how do we tell the difference? Or do we need to? Two guests will join the show this week to "school" us in the fine art of telling the difference between hurting, loving, giving permission for pain, and how to tell whether we are all being hoodwinked into thinking we are stodgy and unsophisticated if we don’t associate pain with love. Monika Johnson Hostler is the Executive Director of the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault (NCCASA). Monika worked at the local rape crisis center in Scotland County as the Crisis Intervention Coordinator. Monika has been an activist in the social justice movement for more than 15 years. She has presented on the issue of sexual violence to numerous communities including the Joint Task for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Military Academy subcommittee, and was appointed by the Obama administration to serve on the National Advisory Committee on Violence Against Women. Tre’Andre Valentine is a queer activist from Trinidad & Tobago and has been with The Network/La Red, a survivor-led social justice organization working to end partner abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and/or trans*, SM and polyamorous communities since 2009 as the Community Programs Coordinator providing support services to survivors. Tre’Andre currently serves as the Director of Community Engagement, increasing visibility of the issue of LGBQ/T



WHERE HAS ALL THE HEALTH CARE GONE?
Feb 14 2015 61 mins  
WHERE HAS ALL THE HEALTH CARE GONE? Been to the doctor lately? Or was it a physician’s assistant? What about all those annual tests we were told we needed? Had any of those lately? Been told you’re too old for a PAP test? What is going on in the world of doctors and patients and who makes all these decisions? And how do these decisions affect women who have been traumatized or abused? So many changes, so many questions. What can we expect in the new world of affordable care? If anyone can help us figure it out, it’s Lyle Larson, PhD, PA-C, Chief Physician Assistant, University of Washington Medical Center, and Teaching Associate, Division of Cardiology, Electrophysiology Section. Lyle teaches, practices, and has worked with and edited several scholarly publications. He writes and lectures in the medical field, working with not only physicians and physicians’ assistants, but also with research and funding. With so much of the dialog about health care centering on cost and accessibility, it’s sometimes hard to realize that the day to day visiting of the doctor’s office or the emergency room may be altered by all the changes. Let’s learn more about what we are facing in our medicine-doctor-patient futures. Lyle is joining us this Saturday to talk about health concerns and questions we face as we go down a new road to treatment and relationships in the era of health care reform. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to talk about what is new, what we need to know and what we should expect as we go forward to health care’s next face. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

POTATOE, POTAHTO- DOES IT REALLY MATTER HOW YOU SAY IT?
Feb 07 2015 61 mins  
POTATOE, POTAHTO- DOES IT REALLY MATTER HOW YOU SAY IT? Remember when we had firemen and man hole covers? Think those days are over? Well think again! Language, words and what we say has all sorts of power; power that can influence social attitudes and even career expectations. If you thought the word war was won 30 years ago, think again. Rosalie Maggio is the award-winning author of over 20 books, including the 2-million-copy bestseller How to Say It; a French-language biography of daredevil Marie Marvingt; 2 children's books and hundreds of children's stories; one of the largest collections of women's quotations in print; how-to books like The Art of Talking to Anyone and The Art of Organizing Anything, and 4 books on biased language, including the just-published Unspinning the Spin: The Women's Media Center Guide to Fair and Accurate Language. Published by McGraw Hill, Prentice-Hall, Beacon, Morrow, and others, her books have been translated in Japanese, Italian, Chinese, Thai, Korean, and Arabic. Her website, www.quotationsbywomen.com showcases 43,000 quotations by 6,700 women under 1,000 topics. She is currently writing an English-language biography of Marie Marvingt (see www.mariemarvingt.com) and working on screenplays. She will join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to talk about language, words, gender and bias. And I’ll bet you are rocked by what she has to say about the words we use. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

WHO'S WATCHING OUT FOR THE KIDS' SAFETY?
Jan 31 2015 60 mins  
You see red hearts, lace hearts, romantic messages and love in the air at this Valentines time of year. But after the lace and roses, most of us face the real every-day tasks of raising families and caring for our kids. Most governmental agencies have some focus on keeping people safe, and some focus exclusively on keeping children safe in our dangerous world. The coordinator for a Washington State coalition dedicated to educating folks about safety for children is our guest this Saturday. Kathleen Clary-Cooke is with Safe Kids Benton-Franklin Health District, an organization that provides staff, operation support and other resources to keeping kids safe. Based on the needs of the community, this coalition implements evidence-based programs, such as car-seat checkups, safety workshops and sports clinics, that help parents and caregivers prevent childhood injuries. Kathleen spent a number of years in the communications field before going to law school and keeping a private practice for a number of years. Her work with abused and neglected children led her to her work with the Safe Kids Coalition. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about how to keep kids safe, and what can happen when we don’t. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


ADVERTISING AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE EDUCATION. WHAT'S EFFECTIVE?
Jan 17 2015 61 mins  
You’ve seen the ads- a bruised and bloodied woman looks plaintively at the camera. Or a movie star plays the role of a battered woman being degraded and beaten. Or even a picture of a cemetery and mourners. All the images and audio are designed to let the watcher understand the seriousness of domestic violence. The ads can be shocking, even gut-wrenching. But what do those ads really do to help victims of domestic violence? Is the image being conveyed effective in either educating the public, or helping the victims? All good questions, and one academic has done studies to find out. Courtney Welton-Mitchell is the director of the Humanitarian Assistance Applied Research Group at the University of Denver. She earned her Ph.D. in Social Psychology in 2012, holds two M.A. degrees, in social psychology and mental health counseling, and is a licensed clinician . She will join us Saturday to talk about what her research showed when it comes to effective messages about DV. What is the message ads give about DV, what outcomes do the current approaches have, and is there a better way to educate, protect, and fund raise to help abused women? Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about violence advertising messages and effects. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalk




SUPERVISED VISITATION – THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UNREALISTIC
Dec 13 2014 61 mins  
SUPERVISED VISITATION – THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UNREALISTIC If you’ve never known anyone who had some pretty rugged child custody battles, you may not know what supervised visitation is. In cases where the courts are reluctant to allow a parent to spend time with his or her children alone (maybe there are assault or domestic violence issues), the court will order the parent to use the services of a visitation supervisor. This person or organization arranges for the hand off of kids between one parent and another, or will go on the visit with the kids and the parent to be sure everything is all right. Sometimes the parent will have the visit right at a protective facility. Sounds like a great solution for situations where there could be some danger, right? Well, maybe. There are plenty of down sides, and like most things, there are consequences. Join us Saturday when Tracee Parker shares her knowledge about supervised visitation. She was the Program Director of the Safe Havens Visitation Center/Safe & Sound Visitation in the Seattle area during its operation from January 2005 through December 2012. Her background includes domestic violence advocacy, community organizing, violence prevention, mediation, nonviolent conflict resolution training, and domestic violence perpetrator treatment. Tracee is currently working on her doctorate in clinical psychology where her research focus is post-separation battering, family law and domestic violence, and coercive control. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about supervised visitation. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


IS THIS WHAT WE CAN DO TO ELIMINATE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?
Nov 22 2014 61 mins  
IS THIS WHAT WE CAN DO TO ELIMINATE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE? We are always asking ourselves what we can do to prevent or eliminate domestic violence (DV). Could the Quincy Solution be the answer? It makes sense that ending DV requires a legal system that women can use readily to get help, and that takes full legal measures against abusers, right? Seems reasonable, but for whatever reasons, it doesn’t often work that way. The Quincy Solution comes from a 1987 study by a suburban Boston judicial district that actually researched what could help eliminate DV, and they based the Quincy Solution upon that research. They found that in order to be effective against DV, the system had to empower victims and control abusers. Easy to say, but how do we do that? Barry Goldstein, a nationally recognized domestic violence author, speaker and advocate will join us Saturday to talk about the Quincy Solution. He has written several of the leading domestic violence books including Domestic Violence, Abuse and Child Custody co-edited with Dr. Mo Therese Hannah, Representing the Domestic Violence Survivor, co-authored with Elizabeth Liu and Scared to Leave Afraid to Stay. His newest book is The Quincy Solution: Stop Domestic Violence and Save $500 Billion. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about the Quincy Plan and domestic violence. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways


THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE AND HIS BLOODIED WIFE
Nov 08 2014 61 mins  
Did you know There's a U.S. district court judge in Alabama who was arrested in August after his wife called 9-1-1 crying and being audibly beaten by her husband? The police report says the good judge blodied the woman's face and legs and dragged her around the room by her hair. On top of that, his first wife reports he did much the same to her during their marriage. So what's happening? What happens much too often in these cases: he took a plea deal that requires him to see a counsellor once a week for 24 weeks and the whole thing disappears from his record. The community wants him out. The fact is, this man was appointed a judge for life and unless he resigns or is impeached by the U.S. congress, he will still be on the bench hearing cases involving domestic violence and other crimes. And he will sit in judgement of others while his own messy background goes away. Huh? That's right, no jail time, no conviction, even, eventually, no record of arrest. Is this a guy you want to stand before in a court of law? This week we are welcoming Staci Zaretsky, an editor of ABOVE the Law, and a contributor to other legal publications such as Judgepedia, Lawyerist, and Ms. JD. She's been featired on various TV and radio programs including CNBC's Power Lunch, HuffPost Live, and Chicago Public Radio. Staci is a gruaduate of Lehigh University and Western New England University School of Law. She has been published in the Western New England Law Review. She is going to help us figure out what this case is about, how it compares to other domestic violence cases, and what's going on with Judge Mark Fuller.




CHILD MOLESTATION AND ABUSE, SURVIVOR AND EXPERT
Oct 18 2014 61 mins  
Really, if 7th Heaven's Rev. Eric Camden can be a child molester, is nothing sacred? Well, no. Not when it comes to the abuse of children. In light of the recent allegations and investigations into actor Stephen Collins (TV's Rev. Camden) for molesting children, it's time to take another look at just who molesters are, how they operate, hot to recognize them, and how to help kids be safe. We also need to reexamine what we can do about this terrible problem. Did you know a 2004 U.S. Department of Education report said nearly 10 % of students have sexual contact with school employees before they graduate? That report also stated that abuse happens when no one is paying attention to the issue. So let's pay attention. Storm is a writer and poet. She is a survivor and advocate for child abuse victims and has turned that into a personal campaign to speak out against the unspeakable. She wants to help children get out of abusive situations by personally speaking about what she's been through. Daphne Young, Vice President of Communications and PreventionEducation for Childhelp can halp us figure it all out. Childhelp is America's longest running and largets national nonprofit meeting the physical, emotional, educational and spiritual needs of abused and neglected children. The organization focuses on advocacy, prevention, treatment, and community outreach. She has developed a youth safety curriculum for young athletes with Olympic Consultants, the Foundation for Glogal Sports Development called Childhelp: Speak Up, Be Safe for Athletes. Storm and Daphne will give us answers, explain what child molestation really is, and offer strategies and resources for all of us.

DV AWARENESS MONTH – SO WHAT’S UP WITH THAT?
Oct 11 2014 61 mins  
October has been Domestic Violence Awareness Month for a couple of decades now and still some folks don’t get it. You might see a purple ribbon. Maybe some businesses and communities string some purple lights in their windows, but what are we doing this year to increase awareness and honor the lives torn apart by this particularly insidious form of violence against women? There is a National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and we’re lucky to have its new Executive Director, Ruth Glenn join us to talk about what different groups around the country are doing to raise awareness about DV. She worked for the Colorado Department of Human Services for 28 years and served as the Director of the Domestic Violence Program (DVP) for the last nine of those years. Ruth has worked and volunteered in the domestic violence field for over 19 years and holds a Masters’ in Public Administration (MPA) from the University of Colorado Denver, Program on Domestic Violence, as well as a degree in Communications. She has served on many domestic violence program and funding boards, provided hundreds of presentations on domestic violence victimization and survival, testified before the Colorado State legislature, appeared on local and national television, and provided consultation, training and technical assistance on a local and national level on victim/survivor issues as they relate to domestic violence. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to as we discuss what we are doing to improve understanding of intimate partner violence. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like.


GENDER VIOLENCE: IS IT REALLY THAT DIFFERENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST?
Sep 27 2014 61 mins  
GENDER VIOLENCE: IS IT REALLY THAT DIFFERENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST? The news gives us shocking reports of violence against women in the Middle East – stoning, brutality, punishment for being sexually assaulted—it has to be worse than the US, right? It turns out there are vast differences in gender violence, but there also are a surprising number of similarities. Leyla Welkin, Ph.D. is a clinical cross cultural psychologist born in Turkey and educated in the US. After 25 years working in the Pacific Northwest, she founded the Pomegranate Connection Program in Ankara, Turkey in 2008. She has partnered with organizations in the US, the UK, and Turkey to address gender based violence. Welkin has worked with civil and social organizations, government agencies, businesses, universities, and the United Nations Population Fund to develop programs to prevent and intervene in sexual and family violence among Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Her work has given her a unique perspective on talking about the perpetrators, survivors, social views and struggles faced by women in the Middle East and how they compare with those in the United States. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to as we discuss domestic violence and gender abuse in the Middle East and how it compares with that in the US. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

SUICIDE; WHAT ABOUT THOSE LEFT BEHIND?
Sep 20 2014 61 mins  
SUICIDE: WHAT ABOUT THOSE LEFT BEHIND? We’ve all known a friend of a friend, or a family member, or even a celebrity who shocked and dumbfounded us because of his or her suicide. Your children may have school friends who have contemplated or carried out a suicide. Maybe a relative left you wondering for the rest of your life what you could have done. Perhaps you have had thoughts of killing yourself. Not a happy topic, for sure, but one which can affect all of us. September is suicide awareness month, so this is a perfect time to discuss this topic and find out more about the whys and guilt that can accompany it. Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman is responsible for research for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. This includes gathering data from AFSP funded studies and communicating those findings to the larger community and public. She also collaborates on the development of prevention materials such as films, programs and brochures. Dr. Harkavy-Friedman received her B.A. in Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Florida. In 1984 she joined Columbia University/New York State Psychiatric Institute, first as an assistant professor and later an associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry. She has been studying suicidal behavior for more than 25 years and has more than 90 publications. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains a clinical practice at her office in Manhattan.




FIFTY SHADES OF GRAY—SALACIOUS, FREEING, LADY PORN? OR DANGEROUS?
Aug 23 2014 60 mins  
Everybody’s been talking about “Fifty Shades of Gray” the notorious book soon to be movie, telling the story of a young girl experimenting with sexuality with a gorgeous, rich sadist. So is it just a good fantasy, or is it something darker? A recent study by some Michigan State University researchers found that young women who are fans of the book are more likely to be prone to eating disorders, binge drinking and multiple sexual partners, than young women who have not read the books. They are also more likely to have a verbally abusive partner. Coincidence? Maybe, but we’ll learn more Saturday when we talk with Amy Bonomi, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Human Development and Family Studies Department at Michigan State University. Dr. Bonomi’s research focuses on the long-term health effects of domestic violence, dating violence, and child abuse, and the intimacy dynamics/processes that keep violent relationships intact. Dr. Bonomi and her colleagues analyzed abuse and harmed identity in the national bestseller, Fifty Shades of Grey, using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s definitions of intimate partner violence. She is an associate editor at the Journal of Women’s Health and BMC Public Health, and is the recipient of the Distinguished Scholar Award from the College of Education and Human Ecology at The Ohio State University. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about “Fifty Shades of Gray. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you like. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

ATHLETES, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, AND ARE WE TAKING IT SERIOUSLY?
Aug 16 2014 57 mins  
ATHLETES, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, AND ARE WE TAKING IT SERIOUSLY? We’ve all seen the headlines- Ray Rice gets two game suspension for knocking his fiancé unconscious and dragging her off a casino elevator. Joe Mixon under investigation for punching a woman in the face. One of the Steubenville high school students convicted of rape is back on the football field. The news reports go on and on with allegations and prosecutions of athletes at all levels for violence against women. And what are we doing about it? The NFL gives a slap on the hand to Rice (who could have been suspended for numerous games if he had smoked a joint). Sports fans still line up for autographs, and the victims are disparaged for “ruining” the athlete’s life. Have we really slipped down the rabbit hole when it comes to seriously dealing with violent athletes? So let’s talk about it. Brian O’Connor, Director of Public Education Campaigns and Programs for Futures Without Violence where he crafts national and international violence prevention campaigns for a variety of audiences. He’s former marketer of global brands such as Gatorade and Kodak, and reporter for the Village Voice. His work engaging men inspires them to model positive masculinity and teach boys that violence never equals strength. Brian holds a master's from Columbia University and is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists. He is the former president of the board of Root Division, an arts education non-profit based in San Francisco where he lives. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about our responses to athletes who are also abusers. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430.


IF IT DOESN'T LEAVE A BRUISE, CAN IT BE ABUSE?
Aug 02 2014 61 mins  
Dr. Jill Murray IF IT DOESN’T LEAVE A BRUISE, CAN IT BE ABUSE? How can it be abuse when he never hit me? How can you call it domestic violence when there are no black eyes or broken bones? Easy. There are many ways one human being can bully, damage, and control another and only one of them involves physical attacks. Verbal abuse, psychological abuse, spiritual abuse, emotional abuse, financial abuse—they may sound like they are not nearly as bad as those broken bones, but in fact those types of abuse can actually have more devastating consequences for the victim. Bones heal; black eyes get better; but when your security, your peace of mind, your doubts about your worth are consistently beaten down, the effects are not so easily repaired. Dr. Jill Murray is an expert in teen dating violence as well as an expert on domestic violence issues, and has a private practice in California. She has been on Oprah, Dr. Phil (and we’re going to ask her about him, for sure), Anderson Cooper, 20/20 and other national programs. She also has written several books on abusive relationships, including her most recent, “But He Never Hit Me,” which won the Publisher’s Choice award. She knows her stuff, and she is going to share it with us on Saturday. Join us Saturday at 11 am Pacific Time to learn more about how abuse can be many things, and how abuse can have long lasting consequences for its victims. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430.

WHAT WAS THE JUDGE THINKING? THE JUDICIAL SIDE TO FAMILY COURT DECISIONS
Jul 26 2014 61 mins  
You’ve heard it - “My wife is crazy, but the courts are so prejudiced against men, she got full custody.” “He was abusing me in front of the children, but the judge didn’t even pay attention to me- he got full custody.” “We have shared custody – how can I ever get him/her to be reasonable when it comes to the decisions about the kids?” Oh, the horror stories we hear. It seems like men’s groups and women’s groups are becoming more active about the sad state our family courts are in. Anyone who’s been in front of a judge knows the fear, the devastation and the lifelong impact of their decisions regarding divorce and child custody. It seems like everyone is let asking, “What was that judge thinking?” Now is your chance to find out. Join us Saturday to hear A Colorado family court judge explain how judges think, assess, and make decisions, and what laws they have to consider when making those decisions. Angela R. Arkin has been a District Court Judge in the 18th Judicial District since 2002. She’s a graduate of Emory Law School, and is licensed in Colorado, Georgia and the District of Columbia. She began her judicial career by serving two years as a District Court Magistrate in Arapahoe County with a domestic and juvenile docket. She is currently handling a 100% domestic docket in Douglas County. Prior to her current assignment, Judge Arkin has served as a District Judge in all four counties in the District, with mixed dockets including criminal, civil, probate, mental health, juvenile and domestic cases.

THE MEDIA STORY ABOUT WOMEN
Jul 19 2014 61 mins  
The news article covers the latest woman murdered by her husband, and quotes a neighbor saying, “I can’t believe it, he was such a nice guy!” The TV reporter leers happily at the woman wearing a swimsuit while doing a story about a swimming pool. Beauty pageants…er, make that “scholarship pageants,” hang onto the bikini competition while pretending to ask each candidate a tough, intellectual question. How many headlines have screamed, “Grandfather elected to city council,” when the headline about a woman announcing she is a grandmother precedes all other information about her accomplishments? And how can we forget the scantily clad Paris Hilton slithering around the top of a luxury car and being sprayed into her ecstatic face with spouting water, all to sell a hamburger? We are surrounded by media messages regardless of how they portray women, and how does that affect us? Joining us Saturday is media activist Ann Simonton, once a top fashion model, who now works to expose the disturbing consequences of corporate owned media. Simonton appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated and Seventeen, and on the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Cosmopolitan, Women's Day, Bride and many other national magazines. She also appeared on dozens of national television commercials before turning her back on this lucrative career to dedicate her life to exposing commercial media's bias. Ms. Simonton is an authority on the effects of media images and you may have seen her on Dr. Phil, Oprah, Larry King Live, Entertainment Tonight or CNN's Crossfire. She is the founder and Director of Media Watch.


DO RELIGIONS HELP OR HINDER DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VICTIMS?
Jul 05 2014 60 mins  
DO RELIGIONS HELP OR HINDER DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VICTIMS? Popular televangelist Pat Robertson recently advised a child who wrote in asking what to do when his father waves a gun around the mother when they fight. With all apparent concern and sincerity, the TV preacher told the child, “you don’t want to get your father busted,” and that instead of calling the police, the child should tell his mother to tell the father to get help. Huh?? This man clearly has no business giving out advice about domestic violence when he so clearly has no grasp of what it is nor how to handle it. Unfortunately, the young listener isn’t the only one who is getting dicey and dangerous advice about DV. So is Robertson typical of the religious stance on domestic violence? Are women being given advice by their clergy that is wrong, harmful, lacking in understanding of what DV is? Unfortunately, some women are. The good news is that some clergy have the knowledge, understanding and common sense to really help in these situations. Carolyn Scott Brown, M.A., is the Director of Learning and Resources for FaithTrust Institute in Seattle. She helps faith and community organizations develop a combination of resources and training services to help prevent and intervene for domestic & sexual violence, child abuse, teen dating violence and ministerial misconduct. And she does it from a faith-based perspective. Scott-Brown, author, psychologist, and consultant, has an undergraduate degree from Brown University and a Master’s Degree in Counseling Psychology from Columbia University. She is the author of The Black Woman’s Guide to Menopause: Doing Menopause with Heart and Soul. She joins us July 5th to talk about how faith and religion can be compatible with helping abused women stay safe.




THE POLICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE- MORE THAN ARRESTS
Jun 14 2014 61 mins  
THE POLICE AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE- MORE THAN ARRESTS You’ve heard about mandatory arrest in domestic violence cases – somebody is going to jail if you call the police, right? What about dual arrests? Do police have special training for DV? How do they decide who is the perpetrator? Who makes decisions about police training and actions in these cases? All these questions and more will be covered by Margaret Alquist, MSW, MPA, when she joins us Saturday to talk about correction departments and domestic violence. Margaret is currently a presentence writer for sex offenders and also DV lead. She has been involved in domestic violence issues for the Washington State Department of Corrections and is responsible for developing and implementing a DV policy, curriculum, and training for DOC staff. Margaret started out her DV career as a community-based DV advocate with New Beginnings. She also served as a crisis social worker for Oahu Hawaii’s child protection system. Margaret is an active member of the King County DV and Child Maltreatment Coordinated Response Oversight Committee and has participated over the last ten year in an East King County collaborative on DV coordinated response. So let’s talk police and domestic violence! Join us Saturday at 11 Pacific Time to learn more about this significant topic. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you are able. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways




GENDER STUDIES, WOMEN'S STUDIES -DO WE REALLY NEED THEM?
May 10 2014 60 mins  
GENDER STUDIES, WOMEN’S STUDIES—DO WE REALLY STILL NEED THEM? You remember women’s studies – started around the time young women were supposedly burning their bras. If you’re a supporter of the programs, they are a place to learn the history of feminism, equality, and women’s accomplishments in the world. If you aren’t a supporter, those programs are for women with short hair and Birkenstocks to learn how to resent men. Fortunately, both those stereotypes are off the mark. So – what is women’s studies and how are such programs relevant today? We’ll get those answers and more as Yi-Chun Tricia Lin, Director and Professor of the Women’s Studies Program at Southern Connecticut State University, joins us for Saturday’s show. Growing up in Taiwan, Tricia was expected to follow a life as previous generations of women had- obedient and submissive to patriarchy. That didn’t work for her, and instead she went to graduate school and became a teacher focusing on social justice issues, including gender, racial, and socio-economic issues. She also is very active in leadership of a number of academic and political organizations, including Veteran Feminists of America, New Haven League of Women Voters, and the National Women’s Studies Association. Tricia also contributed to several publications including a special issue on transnational Indigenous feminism with Lectora (University of Barcelona), forthcoming in 2016. If anyone knows the current status of women’s studies, it is Tricia.

WHATS ALL THE TALK ABOUT TRAFFICKING?
May 03 2014 61 mins  
Some news articles, some TV clips, a few coffee break discussions are popping up about human trafficking. Isn’t that a problem found only in the slums of Asia? Unfortunately it’s an issue that is much more prevalent than most of us know, and it affects people everywhere – even cherry cheeked farmers’ daughters in Iowa. Joining us this Saturday for a discussion about what trafficking is, who it affects, and what we can do about it, will beVelma Veloria, former Washington State legislator, and expert on trafficking, will join us. Ms. Veloria was instrumental in passing HB1175, making Washington the first state in the nation to criminalize trafficking. She’s now working to address corporate responsibility around human trafficking, as well as working with Washington legislators to formulate and pass legislation that would make aspects of human rights offenses covered under Washington law. She authored legislation that created a Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on International Trade Policy in the State Legislature. As a former labor organizer, Ms. Veloria has established a track record of for laws and education about family issues across the broader community. In 2011, Ms. Veloria was recognized by the National Women’s Political Caucus (NWPC) with the Women of Courage Award, which is presented to women from diverse backgrounds that have demonstrated courage by taking a stand to further civil rights and equality. Join us Saturday at 11 to learn more about this significant topic. Call-in with your comments to (646) 378-0430. And if you miss the live program, you can go to the website and listen to all our archived programs whenever you are able. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/3women3ways

















































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