The Weekly

Oct 21 2020 23 mins 6

This is the Weekly, a 20-minute weekly podcast of The Church at Greer Station where we discuss books, current events, and issues relevant to the life of our church.



































2.21 | What Screwtape said about COVID-19
Mar 18 2020 13 mins  
What does Screwtape have to say about the coronavirus?  Listen up. The quote Trevor read from Screwtape Letters: You say you are "delirious with joy" because the European humans have started another of their wars. I see very well what has happened to you. You are not delirious; you are only drunk… Do not allow any temporary excitement to distract you from the real business of undermining faith and preventing the formation of virtues. Give me without fail in your next letter a full account of the patient's reactions to the war, so that we can consider whether you are likely to do more good by making him an extreme patriot or an ardent pacifist. There are all sorts of possibilities. In the meantime, I must warn you not to hope too much from a war. Of course a war is entertaining. The immediate fear and suffering of the humans is a legitimate and pleasing refreshment for our myriads of toiling workers. But what permanent good does war do us unless we make use of it for bringing souls to Our Father Below? When I see the temporal suffering of humans who finally escape us, I feel as if I had been allowed to taste the first course of a rich banquet and then denied the rest. It is worse than not to have tasted it at all. The Enemy, true to His barbarous methods of warfare, allows us to see the short misery of His favourites only to tantalise and torment us-to mock the incessant hunger which, during this present phase of the great conflict, His blockade is admittedly imposing. Let us therefore think rather how to use, than how to enjoy, this European war.  For it has certain tendencies inherent in it which are, in themselves, by no means in our favour. We may hope for a good deal of cruelty and unchastity. But, if we are not careful, we shall see thousands turning in this tribulation to the Enemy, while tens of thousands who do not go so far as that will nevertheless have their attention diverted from themselves to values and causes which they believe to be higher than the self... Men are killed in places where they knew they might be killed and to which they go, if they are at all of the Enemy's party, prepared. How much better for us if all humans died in costly nursing homes amid doctors who lie, nurses who lie, friends who lie, as we have trained them, promising life to the dying, encouraging the belief that sickness excuses every indulgence, and even, if our workers know their job, withholding all suggestion of a priest lest it should betray to the sick man his true condition! And how disastrous for us is the continual remembrance of death which war enforces. One of our best weapons, contented worldliness, is rendered useless. In wartime not even a human can believe that he is going to live forever.






























2.7 | On Reading Revelation
Sep 16 2019 27 mins  
On September 8, our church began a teaching series on Revelation 1-3; Jesus' letters to the 7 churches. Revelation, as a unique book in the New Testament, can appear really challenging from the outset. So how can we go about reading it? What are some rules of thumb to guide our reading? Trevor talks with Aaron Markham and Bryce Harrison about Dennis Johnson's seven strategies for seeing. Give us a listen! "Seven strategies for seeing" from Dennis Johnson's Triumph of the Lamb, summarized by Justin Taylor: Revelation is given to reveal. It makes its central message so clear that even those who hear it can take it to heart and receive the blessing it promises. Revelation is a book to be seen, a book of symbols in motion. Because the appearance of individuals and institutions in everyday experience often masks their true identity, Revelation is given in visions full of symbols that paradoxically picture the true identity of the church, its enemies, and its Champion. Revelation makes sense only in the light of the Old Testament. Not only the visions of such prophets as Ezekiel, Daniel, and Zechariah but also historical events such as creation, the fall, and the exodus provide the symbolic vocabulary for John’s visions. Numbers count in Revelation. Since numbers are used symbolically in Revelation, we must discern the meaning that they convey rather than trying to pull them as numbers directly into our experience, measured by calendars and odometers. Revelation is for a church under attack. Its purpose is to awaken us to the dimensions of the battle and the strategies of the enemy, so that we will respond to the attacks with faithful perseverance and purity, overcoming by the blood of the Lamb. Revelation concerns “what must soon take place.” We must seek an understanding that touches the experience of our brothers and sisters in the seven first-century congregations scattered in the cities of western Asia Minor. Revelation is not about events and hostile forces remote from their struggle. The victory belongs to God and to Christ. Revelation is pervaded with worship songs and scenes because its pervasive theme–despite its gruesome portrait of evil’s powers–is the triumph of God through the Lamb. We read this book to hear the King’s call to courage and to fall down in adoring worship before him. Revelation video from the Bible Project










































































































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