Social Entrepreneur

Dec 20 2020 30 mins 52

Social Entrepreneur exists at the intersection of profit and purpose. We tell positive stories from underrepresented voices, focused on solutions.





Using Human-Centered Design to Prevent Maternal and Infant Deaths, with Karima Ladhani, Giving Cradle and Barakat Bundle
Dec 20 2020 40 mins  
For extended show notes, go here: https://tonyloyd.com/karima-ladhani/ 80% of maternal and infant deaths are preventable. Dr. Karima Ladhani is the daughter of immigrants. Her parents moved from India to Uganda. In 1972, Ugandan president Idi Amin expelled Asian minorities. He gave 90 days to leave the country. Karima’s mother made her way to Canada. Her father was in a refugee camp in Malta before immigrating to Canada. “We can’t take for granted the luxuries and privileges that we have,” she says. “There are people going through things. We have an opportunity and responsibility to help them. Others have helped us. We never know when we could be in that position in the future. It’s our responsibility to society to do our best to uplift all.” When Karima was in fifteen years old, she volunteered to travel to Chitral Pakistan where she taught English and Science. “It was transformative. It was my first experience of seeing dignity in places we don’t often associate with dignity.” From Finance to Free Falling As an undergrad at the University of Waterloo, Karima studied finance. “I thought my goal was to work on the trading floor and to become a trader.” In her fourth year of school, Karima had a chance to work on the trading floor. “Within two weeks, I realized I hated it. The world I was in was interesting. I always thought I could volunteer on the side. My work and these other interests don’t have to align. But I found it wasn’t sufficiently motivating for me. I decided I had to take drastic change. “Before I graduated, I emailed every professor. I told them that I have no experience in science. But I have a hunch that there is something in this medical-health field that would be more satisfying for me. Here are the transferrable skills I could bring to the table. “Only one professor replied to me. When all my friends went on to high-paying jobs, I went on to a minimum wage research assistant job in this small town of Waterloo. “That’s how I learned about public health. I was exposed to this world of population-level health. Then, I was trying to figure out my next steps. I often call this my free-falling period. I took a risk. I had no idea where I was going to end up. Taking a risk is what allows you to grow. If I continued to know what ground I was going to step on the ground in front of me, I could only land where I expected – what was in the realm of my imagination. But, by free-falling, I allowed myself to go beyond that.” Giving Cradle and Barakat Bundle In North America, Giving Cradle provides a safety-certified, eco-friendly bamboo rocking cradle. Families can make a safe choice for their newborn and for a newborn in need. In South Asia, they provide lifesaving Barakat Bundles. These bundles include a Giving Cradle, evidence-based medical items, and health education to families in need. Karima pitched the idea at the Harvard Business School New Venture Competition. They won enough funding to help them get started. Today, Karima is the Founder & CEO of Giving Cradle. They sell safety-certified bamboo rocking cradles to families in North America. For every Giving Cradle sold, a mother and newborn in South Asia receive a bundle of needed supplies through Barakat Bundle. “I think it is unjust that women and newborns continue to die from causes the world has already solved,” Karima says. “80% of maternal and infant deaths are completely preventable. We already have the tools to solve this problem. We just haven't figured out how to get the items that are needed into the hands of people who need them. If we do get them the needed items, we need to teach them how to use them, and they need to want to use them.” Learn More About Karima Ladhani, Giving Cradle and Barakat Bundle: Giving Cradle: https://givingcradle.com Barakat Bundle: https://barakatbundle.org Giving Cradle on Instagram: https://instagram.com/givingcradle Barakat Bundle on Instagram: https://instagram.com/barakatbundle

A Safe Space in Times of Crisis, with Katherine Woo, Airbnb.org
Dec 08 2020 26 mins  
Airbnb.org to support emergency response around the world. Natural disasters are on the rise. Climate change has accelerated wildfires and hurricanes. Healthcare workers are responding to the global pandemic. People find themselves displaced without warning. Who better to provide a safe place to stay than Airbnb and their global network of hosts? To respond to the need for safe housing during disaster, Airbnb has launched Airbnb.org. Airbnb.org is an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to facilitating temporary stays for people in times of crisis. The inspiration for Airbnb.org began in 2012 with a single host named Shell who opened her home to people impacted by Hurricane Sandy. Since then, Airbnb hosts have responded to natural disasters like an earthquake in Nepal, and manmade tragedies, like the Pulse Nightclub shooting. Airbnb hosts have provided stays to evacuees, relief workers, refugees, and asylum seekers. Recently, frontline workers fighting the spread of COVID-19 have benefited from the generosity of Airbnb and their hosts. More than 100,000 hosts have opened their homes and helped provide accommodations to 75,000 people in times of need. Going forward, Airbnb’s Open Homes and Frontline Stays programs will now be called Airbnb.org. Katherine Woo to Lead Airbnb.org Katherine Woo is the new Head od Airbnb.org. She brings a wealth of business and tech experience. She has held roles at Netscape, PayPal, eBay, and Facebook. But it was her work at Kiva.org that helped her to realize that her work could have a direct impact on people in need. She is joined by a staff and a board that reflects the communities they serve. Airbnb.org is building a diverse team at all levels, starting with its founding board of directors. At launch Airbnb.org’s founding board is composed of 80% women and 40% underrepresented minorities. Board members include: Joe Gebbia, Co-Founder of Airbnb, Chairman of Airbnb.org Jennifer Bond, Founder & Managing Director of the University of Ottawa Refugee Hub and Chair of the Global Refugee Sponsorship Initiative (GSRI)Jocelyn Wyatt, CEO of Ideo.orgMelissa Thomas-Hunt, Head of Global Diversity and Belonging at AirbnbSharyanne McSwain, COO of Echoing Green Learn More About Katherine Woo and Airbnb.org: Airbnb.org: https://airbnb.org Katherine Woo on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinewoo


The Power of Voice to Make an Impact, with Regina Larko, #impact Podcast
Dec 06 2020 33 mins  
For extended show notes, see: https://tonyloyd.com/regina-larko A place and a community shaped Regina Larko. Regina Larko was born and raised in Vienna. “Three generations raised me,” Regina says. “My great-grandmother played a huge role in raising me. Her generation had experienced the hardships of the second world war. One of my great grandfathers never came home from the war.” When Regina was around nine years old, the former Yugoslavia broke apart, plunging the territory into ethnic wars. Refugees poured across the border into Austria. Many of Regina’s classmates moved to Austria to escape the fighting. She heard first-hand the stories of refugee children. “I felt immense gratitude for growing up in a peaceful, safe city,” she says. Regina also spent her summers in a small village of 300 inhabitants located 50 kilometers outside of Vienna. There, she learned the value of community. She saw how community members took care of one another. “There is so much purpose and meaning in every single small action,” Regina explains. “Neighbors and extended family members would always look out for each other. This is the reason I am so passionate about purpose-driven work that draws its energy from the community. “It has always bothered me that there is so much inequality in the world - that I had privileges just because of the place and time I was born. I always wanted to live in a fair, equal, and peaceful place. I wanted everyone to have the same rights and possibilities I have. It frustrates me that there are so many people out there suffering every day, just trying to survive.” #impact Podcast is Born Regina launched #impact Podcast in the spring of 2017. They feature inspirational, motivational, and impactful stories. The listeners of #impact Podcast are interested in social impact and sustainability initiatives. #impact marries two passions in Regina’s life: audio and purpose-driven work. As an audio enthusiast, Regina has always loved how intimate the medium of audio felt. Listeners create pictures in her head. #impact Podcast tells impactful stories in a light, refreshing and inspirational way. Regina talks about the issues, but she also talks about solutions. #impact Podcast portrays individuals making a positive impact in the world. They talk about why and how they got started, the challenges along the way, and what keeps them going. Listeners feel inspired by the individuals that Regina and her co-hosts interview. Listeners feel empowered to create change. The podcast guests often find new volunteers and donors. “The first interviews for #impact were game-changing,” Regina says. “I was clumsily setting up my microphones. I asked very scripted questions. Yet, I saw the impact the conversations made on the guest I featured. These NGOs had never had the chance to tell their story. They humanized their work, giving their cause a voice that people could connect to. They reached new listeners. They found new volunteers. “The first listeners started to reach out, thanking me for introducing them to NGOs. Many listeners started volunteering or donating, thanks to #impact Podcast. That’s when I knew that it was so worthwhile and that I have to continue producing and expanding the show.” Regina Larko’s Work Today Today, Regina is a TEDx speaker. She has been named “10 Women who are shaping Hong Kong for the better”. Her work has been featured in radio, print, and online media. Regina is passionate about inspiring everyone to start making a positive impact. She also mentors aspiring podcasters, empowering them to find the confidence to get their voices heard. Learn More About Regina Larko and #Impact Podcast: #impact Podcast: https://www.hashtagimpact.com #impact on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hashtagimpact Free Podcasting Guide: http://www.hashtagimpact.com/guide Podcasting Course: https://www.hashtagimpact.com/start-a-podcast

A Muscle for Innovation, with Tom Dawkins, StartSomeGood
Dec 01 2020 30 mins  
How do we get more people involved in social innovation? NOTE: For extended show notes, see https://tonyloyd.com/tom-dawkins Tom Dawkins is the founder of StartSomeGood, the leading home of cause-driven crowdfunding, innovative partnerships, and social entrepreneur education. I first interviewed Tom nearly five years ago, on December 14, 2015. You can hear our previous interview at https://tonyloyd.com/018. Tom keeps coming back to one fundamental question. How do we get more people involved? “All of us are smarter than any of us,” he says. “It’s essential in a world that is evolving so rapidly. It’s never good enough to come up with a single good idea, a single solution, because things that were proven to work yesterday won’t work tomorrow. “Those of us who care about the future, the planet, and the community, we need not just to find innovations, we need to build an innovation muscle. As a community, the best way to innovate is to ensure that every perspective is heard. Everyone has an opportunity to participate in that process of creating a better future. “One of my foundational beliefs is that all the ideas are already out there. They’re often held by someone who has lived experience of a particular challenge. “But so many people don’t know how to get their ideas out into the world. They don’t know how to turn it into a story that will resonate with people. They don’t know how to identify: Who is it for? What’s the value I create for them? “They don’t have access to a network or impact investors or other types of supporters. So, we started with crowdfunding, but since then, we’re adding all these pieces that might help people make that leap as well.” What Do Early-Stage Social Entrepreneurs Need? “There are three key types of capital they need to underpin progress and impact. “There’s intellectual capital, which is knowing how to do things or accessing the people who do. “Financial capital is in some ways to fill the gaps of your intellectual capital – to pay for things that you can’t acquire in other ways. And to boost growth and reach. “And then relational capital, which helps you not to burn out. It’s more than accessing people who know stuff. It’s people who care about you – people who understand the journey. “ The Next Level of Evolution for StartSomeGood Today, StartSomeGood builds capacity for early-stage social innovators in several ways. They run accelerators on behalf of corporate partners. They have the Good Hustle, a ten-week social enterprise design course. And they offer other workshops. They run live crowdfunding events called Pitch for Good. They run inspirational events such as their annual Starting Good virtual summit. They provide the Starting Good Network, an exclusive community for those committed to changing the world. And they continue to innovate on their crowdfunding platform. StartSomeGood now offers a recurring crowdfunding model. Learn More About Tom Dawkins and StartSomeGood: StartSomeGood: https://startsomegood.com Recurring Crowdfunding model: https://startsomegood.com/recurring Good Hustle: https://www.goodhustle.online Starting Good virtual summit: https://www.starting.gd Starting Good Network: https://startsomegood.com/starting-good Tom Dawkins on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomdawkins Tom Dawkins on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tomjd

Wrap-up of Season Two and Kick-Off Season Three of Social Entrepreneur
Nov 30 2020 8 mins  
In season two, we’ve been telling stories of a just and equitable transition to a clean energy future. The Coronavirus is a wakeup call. If you don’t know by now, the way we’ve been living isn’t working for the earth. Most of all, it is not working for the poorest inhabitants of the earth. Climate change, extreme weather, hurricanes, floods, droughts, melting glaciers, rising sea level , wildfires, degraded food supplies, tick-borne diseases, mosquito-borne diseases, climate refugees, political instability – these are just a few results of our current way of living. The way we produce, transmit, and store our energy, hurts the poorest among us. The way we grow, waste, and consume food hurts the poorest among us. The way we transport ourselves, and our goods, hurts the poorest among us. We way we produce and consume goods, hurts the poorest among us. The way we build, heat, and cool buildings, hurts the poorest among us. The climate crisis is a social justice crisis. But there are solutions: wind energy, solar, energy efficient lighting, smart buildings, regenerative agriculture, alternative transportation systems, and consumer trends are available to us. We must change. We can change. And we will change - if not for ourselves, for the poorest among us. That is why we produced season two of Social Entrepreneur where we’ve been telling stories of a just and equitable transition to a clean energy future. Season Two Wrap-up In Season Two, we talked with: Jonathan Foley of Project Drawdown. Jessica Hellman, Director of the Institute on Environment at the University of Minnesota. Ry Brennan. Ry reminds us that the problems with electrical generation and distribution are systemic and complex. The solutions are at the systems level. Janet McCabe of the Environmental Resilience Institute Mark Kuo of Routific Robert Blake of Solar Bear. Deepinder Singh of 75F Mary Jane Melendez of General Mills Lauren Gregor of Rent-a-Romper Steven Downey of Harmony Fuels Sebastian Sajoux of Arqlite Dave Goebel of enVerde Looking Ahead to Season Three of Social Entrepreneur We’re kicking things off with someone I admire and consider to be a friend, Tom Dawkins of StartSomeGood. Karima Ladhani will tell us about Giving Cradle and Barakat Bundle. Ruth Biza will tell us about #ThisisMyEra. One of my favorite storytellers, Denise Withers will talk about Story Design. And Nichol Beckstrand will talk about YardHomesMN. Still Looking for Guests for Season Three Our commitment is this: We tell positive stories from underrepresented voices, focused on solutions. If you know someone we should interview, here is what we’re looking for in a guest: https://tonyloyd.com/guest.

A Former Oil Executive Transforms Waste to Energy, with Dave Goebel, enVerde
Nov 22 2020 22 mins  
enVerde converts organic waste into sustainable clean energy. The Office for Technology Commercialization (OTC) is the office at the University of Minnesota whose mission is to facilitate the transfer of technology to licensees. This allows for the development of new products and services that benefit the public good. It also fosters economic growth and generates revenue. Since 2006, the University has spun out 170 startup companies. But there is a challenge. Technology transfer is not simple. For a venture to be successful, it must be desirable (the market wants it), feasible (an organization can produce a market solution), and viable (the cost structure and returns are sustainable). There is a vast desert from license to commercialization. Research can create an idea that is desirable but is not viable or sustainable. It takes time to prove out and commercialize a technology. The time and effort to commercialize a technology is often called the commercialization gap. On today’s episode of Social Entrepreneur, we talk to Dave Goebel, CEO and Founder of enVerde. enVerde has licensed a thermochemical catalytic technology from the University of Minnesota. The catalyst converts organic material into heat energy. enVerde provides circular economy solutions by repurposing carbon-containing waste into clean, sustainable energy and chemicals. The Problem with Organic Waste Every day, the average American generates 4.4 pounds of waste. That includes paper, plastics, yard trimmings, food waste, wood, rubber, leather, textiles, and more. At the same time, the US Energy Information Administration predicts nearly 50% increase in world energy usage by 2050. What if we could use organic waste to provide clean, renewable energy? That’s the promise of enVerde. They are addressing the nearly infinite amount of organic waste and the growing need for energy. They do so in an environmentally friendly, cost-effective manner. Waste becomes a resource instead of a problem. “Waste is stored energy and we have a clean way to liberate, free, that energy for our use,” says enVerde Founder and CEO, Dave Goebel. “We economically transform organic wastes into a product called syngas. We also produce heat in the process. Both syngas and heat can be power sources for making electricity. “Syngas is also convertible into new clean fuels like hydrogen, methanol, or dimethyl ether. It can be green precursor for other chemical processes displacing petroleum products. “Agricultural, industrial, commercial, and other organizations decrease their operating expenses by significantly reducing their waste streams and creating clean fuels/heat they can use locally and immediately.” Recent Successes enVerde is finding some successes along the way. The inventor of the technology, Dr. Paul Dauenhauer won a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award. enVerde was also selected as a member of the next cohort with Creative Destruction Lab. Creative Destruction Lab accelerator program is based out of Calgary, Alberta. Learn More About David Goebel and enVerde: enVerde: https://www.enverdellc.com enVerde on Twitter: https://twitter.com/enVerdeLLC enVerde on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/enVerdeLLC University of Minnesota Office for Technology Commercialization: https://research.umn.edu/units/techcomm/about-us/overview Dr. Paul Dauenhauer, MacArthur Fellow: https://www.macfound.org/fellows/1056 Creative Destruction Lab, Energy: https://www.creativedestructionlab.com/streams/energy

An Ecosystem of Environmental Entrepreneurship, with Sebastian Sajoux, Arqlite
Sep 12 2020 33 mins  
For extended show notes, look here: https://tonyloyd.com/sebastian-sajoux/ 93% of plastic is not recycled. Only seven to nine percent of the plastic that is generated on an annual basis is recycled. Sebastian Sajoux explains, “The plastics go to a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF, pronounced “Murph”), and then go into a recycling system. Still, 50% of plastics that are manufactured are impossible to recycle with current technologies. “The number that’s really scary is, by 2050 the amount of plastic used and discarded will double.” “We are in this race to become more efficient in separation and recycling, but we are still manufacturing products that cannot be recycled.” Why Some Plastic is Born Unrecyclable "Plastics are divided into categories,” Sebastian told me. “Usually, you see the numbers one through seven in a recycling system. They can only be recycled within the same stream. “There are also rigid plastics, such as a shampoo bottle, and flexible plastic, which is a wrapping, for example, for an Oreo Cookie or Lays Potato Chips. “For flexible plastics, because it is so thin, it requires different layers to work together to be safer, to keep the product for more time. So, you exchange thickness for another technology. If you combine two different types of plastics, it is automatically unrecyclable. “What we are addressing is all of the flexible packaging out there that was born unrecyclable. It seems like a wrapper from, let’s say a butter toffee, it’s harmless. But people discard them every day. “So, laminates are our main focus.” A Solution to Unrecyclable Plastics Arqlite takes unrecyclable mixed plastic and produces a gravel that can be used in construction. When compared to traditional mineral gravel, Arqlite’s smart gravel is three times lighter, ten times better insulator, doesn’t break or produce dust, and doesn’t require hydration. These are all characteristics that are desirable in the construction industry. Lighter gravel is easier and cheaper to transport. It can be manufactured locally, reducing costs and greenhouse gas emission. And, it does not require mining to produce. Builders who use Arqlite smart gravel can gain LEED points. The material is recycled, it is locally produced, and it improves insulation. The solution is scalable. “I didn’t want to make countertops and sell 100 countertops per day,” Sebastian says. “I wanted to make gravel and sell 100 trucks per day.” Learn More About Sebastian Sajoux and Arqlite: Arqlite: https://www.arqlite.com Arqlite on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/arqlite_us Arqlite on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arqlite Arqlite on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2aC0VRGB6dLgKxEtCkAI6A/videos


Turn on Your Heat Without Heating Up the Planet, with Steven Downey, Harmony Fuels 
Sep 10 2020 17 mins  
How do you reduce your carbon footprint without breaking the bank? Did you turn on your heat this week? A lot of people in the northern hemisphere either already did, or they will soon. For 12 million homes in the US, that meant burning heating oil or propane, both of which contribute to climate change. For single family homes, the cost of replacing oil and propane furnaces is unrealistic. According to Bankrate, only 40% of Americans could absorb an unexpected expense of $500 or more. Lots of people want to reduce their carbon footprint, but they don’t have extra money to spend. That’s where Harmony Fuels comes in. They are the only carbon-neutral provider of home heating fuel in the US. They didn’t invent a new oil or propane. They make it easy for consumers to reduce their carbon footprints by offering carbon offsets. For each gallon of heating oil or propane its customers purchase, Harmony Fuels buys the equivalent number of pounds of carbon offsets from certified green energy projects. Steve Downey is the president of Harmony Fuels. He admits that carbon offsets are not a silver bullet, but it’s a step in the right direction. Learn More About Steven Downey and Harmony Fuels: Steven Downey on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stevenjdowney Harmony Fuels: https://www.harmonyfuels.com Harmony Fuels on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/harmonyfuels Harmony Fuels on Twitter: https://twitter.com/harmonyfuels Harmony Fuels on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/harmony_fuels

Parents: Reduce Your To-Do List and Your Carbon Footprint, with Lauren Gregor, Rent-a-Romper
Aug 29 2020 25 mins  
For a extended show notes and a full transcript of this conversation, see https://tonyloyd.com/lauren-gregor. Rent-a-Romper makes parents' lives easier while reducing the negative effects of the fashion industry. For just a moment, think about your clothes. At some point in time, you chose each item and brought it into your home. Your neighbor did the same thing. So did the house down the street, and the one several miles away. The same thing happened in a house on the other side of the world. The global population is increasing. The middle class is growing. And so is our demand for fashion. By 2030, the world population will increase from 7.8 billion today to 8.5 billion. You can watch the world population increase in real time here. Not only are there more people on the planet, our standard of living is increasing. The GDP per capita is growing at 2% per year in the developed world and 4% in the developing world. That means more demand on our world resources. Apparel consumption is expected to rise by 63% by 2030, from 62 million tons today to 102 million tons in 2030. That’s the equivalent of adding 500 billion T-shirts to the environment. Why is that a problem? The fashion industry produces about 10% of global carbon dioxide emissions. By 2030, the industry’s CO2 emissions are projected to increase by more than 60%. That’s like adding 230 million more passenger vehicles on the roads. And, it’s not just greenhouse gasses that are a problem. Fashion requires fresh water. The fashion industry consumes 79 billion cubic meters of water per year. That’s equivalent to 32 million Olympic-size swimming pools. But that’s today. By 2030, the fashion industry’s water use will increase by 50%. Apparel production puts toxic substances such as mercury and arsenic into our waterways. Most of the clothing waste ends up in landfills or is incinerated. Only 20% of clothing is collected for reuse or recycling. The amount of solid waste produced by the apparel industry is going to increase about 60% by 2030. So, the environmental impact of apparel is increasing at the same time we need it to be decreasing. If we have any chance of limiting global warming to a 1.5°C increase, we need carbon emissions to be reduced by 45%. One Small Step in the Apparel Industry Lauren Gregor is a mom. She saw what was happening in her own house. With two small children two years apart, she was horrified by the parade of cardboard boxes showing up on her doorstep. “I would get frustrated by the amount of waste that we're generating,” Lauren explains. “But also, how often I felt like I was turning around and getting back to the stores to buy them new things, especially clothes. My boys are tall, they grow fast, they grow very fast at those young ages and I just felt like I was constantly having to do things on my to-do list.” Lauren came up with a solution. She calls it Rent-a-Romper. Rent-a-Romper makes parents' lives easier while easing the negative effects from the fashion industry. Parents can sign up for a monthly subscription and receive a customized capsule of clothing to meet the needs of their growing children. Learn More About Lauren Gregor and Rent-a-Romper: Rent-a-Romper Website: https://www.rentaromper.com/ Rent-a-Romper on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rentaromper Rent-a-Romper on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rentaromperus

When Sustainability Isn’t Enough, with Mary Jane Melendez, General Mills
Jul 13 2020 34 mins  
General Mills is blending regeneration and philanthropy to create impact. How do you feed a hungry world without destroying the planet? And, how do you do so in a way that is just and equitable? Agriculture and forestry activities generate 24% of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. The world population will reach 9.7 billion in 2050. And, a growing middle class in emerging countries is straining our global food supply. Mary Jane Melendez is Chief Sustainability and Social Impact Officer for General Mills. She also serves as President of the General Mills Foundation. “It’s broader than philanthropy and broader than sustainability,” Mary Jane says. “It’s those two areas coming together to drive greater social impact.” General Mills is a leading global food company whose purpose is to make food the world loves. They are a 150-year-old company that is using their scale to produce more quality food while reducing their footprint. Regenerative Agriculture “Our work is rooted in the earth,” Mary Jane explains, “and we want to restore it. We share a unique bond with nature. When there are threats to nature through changes in climate, those are threats to our business. At General Mills, this is a business imperative and a planetary imperative. “Today, about a third of the world’s topsoil is degraded. We have lost about 40% of insect species on the planet, including pollinators that are important to our food. There is nothing about that fate that should be sustained. We don’t want to sustain declining ecosystems. “At General Mills, what we’re being very thoughtful about is our responsibility to move beyond sustainability and think about regeneration.” General Mills has commitment to advance regenerative agriculture practices on one million acres of farmland by 2030. Regenerative agriculture is a system of farming practices that enhance soil health, pulling carbon from the air and storing it in the soil. It helps land to be more resilient to extreme weather events. 100% Renewable Energy Scale can be a force for good as demonstrated by General Mills’ commitment to regenerative agriculture. But scale can also be a burden on the planet. In 2015, General Mills was the first company to publish a goal approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) to reduce absolute greenhouse gas emissions across the company’s full value chain by 28% by 2025. That means that, no matter how much they grow, they committed to reducing their 2010 greenhouse gas emissions. Last April, General Mills also set a goal of 100% renewable electricity worldwide by 2030. “Technology changes quickly,” Mary Jane told me. “As new technologies come online, we are constantly keeping our eyes open for new ways to activate that technology, drive the investments to help reduce our greenhouse gas “ Learn More About Mary Jane Melendez and General Mills: Mary Jane Melendez on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mary-jane-melendez-4a45915/ General Mills Global Responsibility Report: https://blog.generalmills.com/2020/04/2020-global-responsibility-report/ General Mills and Regenerative Agriculture: https://www.generalmills.com/en/News/NewsReleases/Library/2019/March/Regen-Ag General Mills and Renewable Energy: https://www.generalmills.com/en/News/NewsReleases/Library/2020/April/General-Mills-commits-to-100-percent-renewable-electricity-globally-by-2030 General Mills CEO Jeff Harmening’s LinkedIn post from June 4: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/where-we-go-from-here-jeff-harmening/

Comfortable, Efficient, and Healthy Buildings, with Deepinder Singh, 75F
Jun 30 2020 21 mins  
Optimizing building energy efficiency can be complicated and expensive. According to Deepinder Singh, it doesn’t have to be. The world has more than 230 billion square meters of building space with another 65 billion square meters coming online in the next decade. Buildings account for 6% of global greenhouse gasses. With the ongoing global pandemic, the CDC has developed guidelines that encourage more fresh air circulation. The goal is to maintain lower viral load in the work atmosphere. Those guidelines could increase energy consumption. Improving energy efficiency could make a significant dent in climate change. It Started with His Daughter Deepinder Singh is a computer network engineer by training. He designed some of the world’s fastest core networks for AT&T, NTT, and Verizon. In his work on complex systems, he found ways to simplify operational complexity and to make products intuitive. “If you use Verizon,” Deepinder told me, “there’s a 95% chance it goes over a network I built. My claim to fame is that I had one of the first petabit routers sitting in my garage for five years.” When he and his family moved to Minnesota, he ran into a problem that was a little closer to home. “My daughter, who was one at the time, would wake up in the night crying. The temperature in her room would drop ten degrees at night. The thermostat was in the mater bedroom, which was west facing. We were nice and warm because the sun would keep it warm in that room. In the rest of the house, the heat would not kick on. “When my daughter was this uncomfortable, I quit my job to fix the damned problem.” Since Deepinder was not trained in HVAC, he used his computer network skills to solve the problem. 75F, Born Digital to Solve Problems for Commercial Buildings After solving his own problem, Deepinder realized he had a solution with a commercial application. In 2012, Deepinder and his cofounders launched 75F, an intelligent building solution that utilizes the Internet of Things and the latest in Cloud Computing to create systems that predict, monitor and manage the needs of buildings. “I found that there was an even bigger problem in commercial buildings. People are there all day, and somebody is wearing a coat during the summer.” “The building controls industry, the last innovation that they had was in the mid-1990s. They are mechanical engineers who try to design It-controlled solutions. Those solutions are archaic by today’s standards. In the controls industry, people are taking these Lego pieces and they are building a custom solution for each building. To me, that’s an opportunity to disrupt. “I had none of this baggage. I had no idea what the heck I was doing. We were born digital, so we looked at IOT and cloud computing, and created a completely different architecture. It’s modern. It keeps getting upgraded all the time. We look at the building holistically. We use machine learning and AI to implement things that people are doing manually. The building is continuously adjusting and adapting.” 75F uses smart sensors and controls to make commercial buildings healthier, more comfortable, and more efficient than ever before, all at a disruptive price. “Normally energy efficiency and comfort oppose one another,” Deepinder commented. “We’re trying to do both at the same time.” 75F helps customers achieve an average savings of 41.8 percent in energy consumption and carbon footprint. Learn More About Deepinder Singh and 75F: 75F: https://www.75f.io/ Deepinder Singh on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FlyingSardar

Healing is in the Environment, with Robert Blake, Solar Bear
Jun 25 2020 20 mins  
Solar Bear is a Native American owned solar installation company. Robert Blake of Solar Bear has a habit of mashing up two problems and coming up with a solution. His driving philosophy is “healing is in the environment.” Solar Bear is a Native American owned solar installation company. They train people on the Red Lake Indian Reservation to install solar power. “If we can do this in Red Lake, we can bring this out to other tribal nations,” Robert explains. “We’re going to see that solar energy can solve a human health crisis. On Native Nations and reservations, there is a high poverty rate, alcohol addiction, and drug addiction. What I’m hoping is, with this energy source, we can provide opportunities and give purpose to community members.” Solar Bear also works with the Department of Corrections, and the Willow River Correctional Facility to provide a solar installation workforce development program for the inmates. “The idea here is to battle mass incarceration with climate change,” Robert says. “Here in the United States, we are one of the leaders in incarcerating our citizens. We have this existential problem. Can we get individuals that are incarcerated to fight climate change? “I believe that healing is in the environment. If we can have these individuals work in the solar industry, be installers, maybe become electricians, this will be a way to heal and give back to society. “It’s a ripple effect. When these individuals come out of the correctional facilities and are doing solar, they are taking their families off of public assistance. They show their kids that they have a steady job, and that breaks the cycle.” Robert is also the executive director of Native Sun Community Power Development. Native promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency, and a just energy transition. They use education, workforce training, and demonstrations. One Native Sun project is creating a K -12 curriculum on climate change. In the pilot program on the Red Lake Reservation, they teach children about energy efficiency, renewable energy, recycling, and gardening. “Imagine a polar bear family that wear sunglasses. They’re solar bears,” Robert explains. “It’s going to be the kids who are going to have to deal with the aftereffects of climate change.” Another Native Sun project is to teach solar installation skills to military veterans. Learn More About Robert Blake, Solar Bear, and Native Sun: Robert Blake on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robert-blake-b5b82543 Solar Bear: https://solarbear.earth Native Sun Community Power Development: https://www.nativesun.org


Delivering Efficiency with Marc Kuo, Routific
Jun 16 2020 26 mins  
Routific uses AI to cut mileage and drive time by 20%-40%. Marc Kuo is the Founder & CEO of Routific. He is a routing expert with nearly a decade of experience in last-mile logistics. But he didn’t always work in logistics. “Being a fresh grad out of school, I just wanted to get into either management consulting or investment banking, simply because of its prestige,” Marc told me. “I was ambitious. I wanted to aim for something challenging. “Once I was in finance, I was on the equity trading floor for one of the investment banks in Hong Kong. It was a glamorous dream job. I was sitting on the fifty-first floor of one of the tallest skyscrapers in Hong Kong. But I just felt a little empty. I was quickly disenchanted by this glamorous job and the corporate life. “I wasn’t adding much value to society, using algorithms to move money from the retired pensioners to the rich bankers. I didn’t feel like it was value added to society.” After being on the job for a year, Marc decided to go back to what he studied in graduate school. He wrote his thesis on route optimization algorithms. From his perch on the fifty-first floor, he watched the ships, trucks, and logistics in the harbor. “I felt a calling to move physical goods and rout them more efficiently. Physical goods are being moved anyway. Why not do it that much more efficiently?” The Big Problem Transportation is responsible for 14% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Imagine a delivery business that delivers to 500 locations every day with a fleet of 10 vehicles. The puzzle of deciding which vehicle goes where and in what order, while making sure the fleet operates as efficiently as possible, is extremely hard. “Every day we optimize the routes of hundreds of delivery businesses around the globe to save them time and fuel,” Marc explains. “Our mission? To make route optimization software accessible to every delivery business. We are passionate about helping businesses thrive and creating a more sustainable world. “Routific surveyed 11,246 businesses and found that 72% still plan routes manually. That means they plan routes using tools like spreadsheets, pen and paper, and Google Maps. Businesses dependent on manual route planning struggle with the consequences of inefficient routes—hours of manual route planning time and inflated delivery costs. “It’s hard work. And humans are not particularly good at it. Businesses report spending anywhere from one to three hours a day trying to plan delivery routes – many of which are not efficient nor optimal.” This is where route optimization software can help. “Aside from saving the manual route planner a lot of time, we also cut mileage and drive time by 20%-40% by generating more efficient routes than humans can ever find.” The fact that most businesses are still manually planning routes is a big problem for the environment. Third-party environmental consultants estimated carbon emission reductions equivalent to planting 86 trees/year for every driver that switches over from manually planned routes to one optimized by Routific. In 2019 alone, Routific helped delivery businesses around the world save 11,322 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions, the equivalent of planting more than 500,000 trees. More Information: https://routific.com/

Environmental Change in the Midwest, with Janet McCabe, Environmental Resilience Institute
May 19 2020 29 mins  
The Environmental Resilience Institute helps midwestern communities understand and prepare for environmental change. There’s something powerful about understanding how a global trend impacts your local community. For example, it’s one thing to hear about world hunger. It’s another to hear about hunger in your state. But there’s a different feeling when you realize that there’s a hungry kid in your neighborhood. As Tip O’Neill said, “All politics is local.” It’s the same thing with climate change. You’ve probably heard about the global climate crisis. And, when your state is mentioned, you might pay attention. But, when you notice the impact on the health and wellbeing of your local community, well, there’s something compelling about that. Climate Change in the Midwest We hear a lot about the impacts of climate change in far-flung corners of the world. We are aware of the dangers of flooding along the US coastline. But what about the Midwest? The average annual temperature has been increasing across the Midwest. Warmer air holds more moisture, which changes moisture patterns. That means more frequent flooding, and drought. For each 1 degree Celsius of warming, the crop yield declines for corn, wheat, rice, and soy. Warmer, wetter winters have led to higher tick populations. The mosquito season is longer. Mosquitoes and ticks spread diseases. Helping Midwestern Communities Understand and Prepare for Environmental Change Janet McCabe is an expert in environmental law and policy. She is the director of the Environmental Resilience Institute at Indiana University. The Environmental Resilience Institute collects data across all 92 counties in Indiana to predict changes in climate, groundwater systems, vegetation, wildlife, and more. Their goal is to help Indiana understand how a changing climate will affect health, communities, industry, and agriculture. Before joining the Environmental Resilience Institute, Janet held key positions in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. Learn More About Janet McCabe and Indiana University Environmental Resilience Institute: · Indiana University Environmental Resilience Institute: https://eri.iu.edu · Janet McCabe on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/janet-mccabe-204b53126

A Just and Equitable Transition to a Clean Energy Future, with Ry Brennan
May 11 2020 30 mins  
The problems are systemic and complex. So are the answers. Globally, the United States accounts for 5% of the world’s population, but we produce 15% of the energy-related CO2 emissions. Coastal flooding, hurricanes, drought, and fires are all related to climate change. And who suffers the most from the impacts of climate change? Mostly the poor and vulnerable. Bringing this closer to home, in the US, 5.9 million people live within three miles of a major coal-fired power plant. On average, these people have a per capital income of $18,400, which is 17% lower than the average in the US. A Yale University study found that Hispanics have the highest exposure rates for 10 out of 14 air pollutants. African Americans have higher exposure rates than whites for 13 out of the 14 air pollutants. 68% of African Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant. Black people are exposed to 1.5 times more particulate matter than white people. Hispanics have about 1.2 times the exposure to particulates than non-Hispanic whites. African Americans are hospitalized for asthma at three times the rate of white Americans. And, the death rate from asthma is 172% higher for African Americans than white Americans. Among children, the results are even worse. According to the Centers for Disease Control, black children are twice as likely to have asthma as white children. And black children are 10 times more likely than white kids to die of complications from asthma. And, that is not to mention increased birth defects, heart disease, lung disease, learning difficulties, and lower property values. The average US household spends 4% of their income on energy costs, while low-income families spend 17% of their income. African Americans spend around $40 billion on energy. Yet, 1.1% of energy jobs are held by African Americans. And, only .01% of energy revenue went to African Americans. The Solutions Can Be the Problem At one level, we have the solutions in hand. King Coal is dead. It is more expensive to generate electricity from coal than from either wind or solar. Wind is the cheapest source of new electricity generation in Minnesota. The cost fell by 16% in one year. The price of solar energy in Minnesota has declined 34% over the last five years. LED lighting is energy efficient. Electric cars don’t emit CO2 from combustion. However, as H. L. Mencken said, “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem—neat, plausible, and wrong.” The problems are systemic and complex. The solutions are at the systems level. According to Ry Brennan, a doctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, “Solving the problems with our existing energy infrastructure requires creating resilient energy systems. These systems must be decentralized, diverse, and open to democratic deliberation. This change will require a dramatic remaking of our hard and soft energy infrastructures.” A Call to Action In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, Ry challenges us to think deeply about our electrical system. “Figure out how energy gets from the plant to your light switch. If you're not happy about it, find out what people in your town are doing about it. If they're not doing anything about it yet, ask if anyone wants to help you make some noise. If you are happy about it, share your community's good idea with someone else.” About Ry Brenna Ry Brennan is a doctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where they study energy justice, infrastructure, environmental sociology, prison ecology, and democracy, especially as these themes and fields relate to energy decentralization. They are also a community organizer working in a range of different affinity groups with the simple ambition of ending oppression in all its forms to cultivate the flourishing of humans, non-human animals, and their ecosystems. They do nothing in their spare time because they have no spare time.

Jessica Hellmann, Geofinancial Analytics and the Institute on the Environment
May 03 2020 22 mins  
If you could invent a post-pandemic world, what world would you create? I hear a lot of people talking about the desire to return to “normal.” However, normal was unsustainable. Before the pandemic, there was another crisis, an environmental crisis. A crisis in our food systems, our energy systems, our clean water systems, and our unequal economic systems. Coronavirus did not break our systems. It revealed how broken our systems already are. There is a saying, “Problems cannot be solved by the same level of thinking that created them." That is why, when faced with intractable problems like COVID-19 or the climate crisis, I like to talk to thought leaders. On the other side of the pandemic, we have an opportunity to begin again. What world can you imagine in a post-pandemic world? I asked this question to Jessica Hellmann, the Director of the Institute on Environment at the University of Minnesota. The Institute on the Environment has a bold vision for the world: Sustainable agriculture feeds the world.Renewable energy powers healthy homes, efficient transportation, and flourishing businesses.Every person has access to food, water and shelter.Oceans, lakes and rivers are clean and healthy.Communities have vibrant economies, neighborhoods and cultures.Thriving ecosystems support thriving economies and societies. Overall, humanity restores and renews resources for the benefit of all living things. IonE is accelerating the transition to this future by supporting breakthrough research across disciplines. They develop the next generation of global leaders, discover breakthrough solutions, and build transformative partnerships. “Universities have been profoundly important in figuring out what environmental issues are,” Jessica explains. “Now, it’s equally, if not more important in addressing those problems.” Jessica says, “Occasionally, there are projects or activities that are created within an interdisciplinary institute. Some ideas continue to flourish within an institute, and some go off elsewhere.” One example of a spinoff from the institute is Geofinancial Analytics. Jessica is the Chief Scientist at Geofinancial Analytics. They are a science-driven benefit corporation. Their mission is to accelerate capital flow from climate stressors to sustainable solutions. They inform investment decisions with transparent, objective facts. Learn More About Jessica Hellmann: Jessica Hellmann: https://jessicahellmann.org/Institute on the Environment: http://environment.umn.edu/Geofinancial Analytics: https://geofinancial.com/



Kickoff, Season Two, Social Entrepreneur
Apr 22 2020 3 mins  
In season two, we are telling stories of an inclusive and just transition to a clean energy future. Happy Earth Day! Welcome to Season Two of Social Entrepreneur. You already know that we tell positive stories from underrepresented voices, focused on solutions. In season two, we are focusing on stories of an inclusive and just transition to a clean energy future. Here are the kinds of guests we will feature: Underrepresented voices such as women entrepreneurs, people of color, Native Americans, LGBTQ voices, and others who don’t normally get the spotlight. The venture capitalist Arlan Hamilton refers to them as the underestimated. We highlight the true hustlers, those who have overcome the most on their journey.Are working to solve big problems, tied to sustainable development goals. In this season, we are focused on an inclusive and just transition to a clean energy future.Have a sustainable business model. We give preference to for-profit businesses. We will consider nonprofit businesses who sell a product or service to sustain their impact.Are solution-focused. Our Guests are making a lasting difference through direct action. Upcoming Episodes: We’re excited to bring you new stories about our clean energy future. Here are some examples of upcoming episodes: Jonathan Foley, Project DrawdownJessica Hellmann, University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment and Geofinacial AnalyticsRy Brennan, Grad Student, UCSBJanet McCabe, Environmental Resilience Institute at Indiana UniversityMarc Kuo, RoutificSteve Downey, Harmony FuelsMany more.

Introducing Thrive. Connect. Contribute.
Apr 22 2020 3 mins  
Positive stories of resilient people who thrive in life, connect with others, and contribute to the world in the face of adversity. Who do you know who is modeling resilience during difficult times? Have you heard any good stories lately? In this critical time, we are surrounded by acts of heroism, both large and small. I want to introduce you to the podcast, Thrive. Connect. Contribute. Here is What You Will Hear: I am sharing stories of resilient people. Here are three examples. Episode 3: How I Overcame Anxiety, Found the Purpose of Life, and Lived a Year of Personal Bests. If you’ve been wondering “What happened to Tony?” This answers the question. It’s been quite a year. Episode 4: These Children Show Us How to Connect with Others in a Time of Crisis. I interview a 10-year-old boy and his 7-year-old sister. They launched a new podcast so that kids can learn and have fun. Episode 10: Crowdsource Kindness During the COVID-19 Crisis with Morgan Schmidt. According to Morgan, the world is full of kind people. She found a way to crowdsource kindness. What I'm Doing During the COVID-19 Crisis I’m looking for these stories. I’ll bet you have heard stories like this. And, I’ll also bet that you have stories from your life. In the middle of this pandemic, I feel compelled to do this. I am calling for stories. Here’s how it works. You can nominate a story that you heard from someone else, or you can tell your own story. Why "Thrive. Connect. Contribute."? Last year I did a personal experiment called “My Year of Personal Bests.” If I boiled the entire year-long experience into one phrase, it would be this: You are here on earth to connect with others and contribute to the world. But before you can connect and contribute, you must first practice self-care. In other words, you must thrive. Thrive. Connect. Contribute. In that order. Take Control of Your Destiny So, help me out, will you? Let’s find and tell the stories of people who are thriving, connecting, and contributing in the face of adversity. Nominate someone to tell their story. Or, let us know about the story you have to tell. We need these stories now more than ever.









Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Elizabeth Sarquis
Dec 17 2018 20 mins  
Global Gaming Initiative provides a suite of tools and services to make it easier for game developers and publishers to produce and monetize games for social good. Note: Between now and the end of the year, we’re counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. It is a people’s choice award, determined by the number of downloads. This interview originally aired on February 12, 2018. Elizabeth Sarquis was born in a small town along the Magdalena River in Colombia. When Elizabeth was five years old, her family moved to the US. Growing up, she went to school in the US and spent time her summers in Colombia. Elizabeth says “It struck me, when I would see children on the streets begging. Then I would go back home, and I would have everything. It didn’t make sense to me.” As an adult, Elizabeth worked in nonprofits focused on children’s issues. During the 2008 financial meltdown, Elizabeth observed how difficult it was for nonprofits to raise funds. And, after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, she noticed that there was a wide gap between the money raised and the impact of those funds. “I knew something had to change,” she says. “I wanted to create a model that used technology, which I love, and create an impact.” In 2010, Elizabeth’s 14-year-old son traveled to Ecuador to volunteer with a nonprofit. Her son told her a story about a boy he met. The boy did not have transportation, and therefore, did not attend school. Elizabeth’s son challenged her to help. Around this same time, Elizabeth found herself playing Angry Birds for hours. She thought, “Can’t we figure out a way to use games, tied to impact?” From this thought cam Global Gaming Initiative. Global Gaming Initiative is a mobile game company that creates games and aligns them with social impact. They are a cooperative. They work with game developer who wants to create social impact through their game. Global Gaming Initiative is a BCorporation. They have been selected as a “Best for the World” company two years in a row. Global Gaming Initiative was not successful right away. They hired eight engineers and animators, spent months on the game, but it was not commercially successful. “We didn’t bring marketing in soon enough,” Elizabeth explains. “At that time, it was a bit more of the wild west in the app store.” One of Global Gaming Initiative’s first successful games was Sidekick Cycle, a competitive retro arcade game that positions players in a race against time. Profits from in-app purchases and advertisement go towards bicycles for kids. The game is popular and has provided lots of bikes. However, parents began to push back on the content of the advertisements. To help control the types of ads that are presented on their games, Elizabeth and her team created Jukko. Jukko connects game players with socially-conscious brands. Jukko is scheduled to launch around April of 2018. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Elizabeth Sarquis “You can make games and you can have an impact.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative “You have to surround yourself with a network of people who believe in what you’re doing.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative “Get involved in your community.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Global Gaming Initiative: https://www.globalgaminginitiative.com/ Global Gaming Initiative on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalGamingInitiative Global Gaming Initiative on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gginitiative Jukko: https://jukko.com Jukko on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/myjukko Jukko on Twitter: https://twitter.com/myjukko Free Bikes 4 Kids: http://fb4k.org Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


Top Twelve Popular Podcasts 2018, Elisa Birnbaum
Dec 14 2018 23 mins  
In the Business of Change features stories of changemakers who use the power of business to address society’s most pressing problems. Note: Between now and the end of the year, we’re counting down the top twelve popular podcast interviews of 2018. It is a people’s choice award, determined by the number of downloads. This interview originally aired on May 24, 2018. Elisa Birnbaum is the publisher and editor-in-chief of SEE Change Magazine, a digital publication of social entrepreneurship and social change. You may recall her interview from June 2017. Elisa has a new book out, In the Business of Change: How Social Entrepreneurs are Disrupting Business as Usual. The book highlights how social entrepreneurs are using business savvy to create change in their communities. Elisa tells stories from a wide range of sectors, including employment, food, art, education, and social justice. Each chapter focuses on lessons learned and measurable impact. The book provides practical tips for starting and scaling a social enterprise. Social Entrepreneur Quotes by Elisa Birnbaum: “It’s part storytelling and part lessons for those who want to start their own social enterprise.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “It’s for the average person who wants inspiring storytelling.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “Look at all of this amazing work being done.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I wanted to provide a broad spectrum of people doing things in different sectors.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “The book has actually been on my mind for a long time.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “It’s good to tell stories in different medium.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “You want to get these stories out there in as many ways as you can.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “This was a lot more strategic.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “There were a couple of chapters that ended up changing.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “You have to be flexible.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “Social entrepreneurs are taking a bigger role in systems change.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I didn’t start writing until I had a contract.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I had a book on my mind for many years.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “People don’t get to see the grit, the passion, and the work that goes into it.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “These stories, I find so inspiring.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I enjoyed the process more than I imagined I would.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: In the Business of Change: How Social Entrepreneurs are Disrupting Business as Usual: https://amzn.to/2ILp2OA Elisa Birnbaum’s previous interview on Social Entrepreneur: https://tonyloyd.com/storytelling-platform-social-entrepreneurs-elisa-birnbaum-see-change-magazine SEE Change Magazine: http://www.seechangemagazine.com SEE Change Magazine on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/seechangemagazine SEE Change Magazine on Twitter: https://twitter.com/seechangemag SEE Change Magazine on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seechangemag In the Business of Change podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/in-the-business-of-change/id1214748429 Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book
















Developing Young Entrepreneurs, with Dario Otero, Youth Lens 360
Sep 24 2018 21 mins  
Youth Lens 360 is a for-profit marketing company that works with youth. Youth Lens 360 provides visual communication, product marketing, and branding services through the lens of youth ages 14-24. Dario Otero, the founder of Youth Lens 360, has seen first-hand how the education systems do not support, nurture or value entrepreneurial thinking. “I’ve found in my teaching and leadership experience that underrecognized youth of color have a naturally creative and resourceful entrepreneurial spirit. That gets ignored in traditional education settings,” he explains. “As a result, youth will eventually lose that capacity and enthusiasm for education. They don’t stay engaged when we don’t connect what they are learning to the real world of self-sufficiency or survival.” To address the problem of lack of entrepreneurial opportunities, Dario has developed a model called L.E.A.D., or Learn, Experience, Apply, and Debrief. “LEAD allows youth access and opportunities that ignite their desire to start a business, create a product, or become self-sustaining while they work with entrepreneurs,” Dario explains. “It is about finding themselves as contributors, leaders, and money makers.” LEAD is not about a single path, Dario says. “It is about changing the way we see youth. It shatters the stereotype threat that we have about our youth and changes our focus from what they will do to what they can do. When we see them in a new light, they become the light we need to see. “ The vehicle he uses to empower youth is Youth Lens 360, a for-profit marketing company that provides visual communication, marketing, and branding services. “There is an assumption that because my company has a social impact, we are a nonprofit. However, we are for-profit. It is essential that the youth who work for me and with me make money for their talents. It is a model that I hope a lot of for-profit companies learn and apply. Profit and social impact should not be mutually exclusive. It is imperative today that our communities see how the products and services big business provides also contribute to our health and welfare on a daily basis. We are all in this together, and we can still make a ton of money. Nobody loses. Dario’s passion is to empower youth. He encourages them to set their goals high and to implement a plan to achieve those goals. Dario believes that all youth should acquire the necessary skills to become entrepreneurs. He also thinks that the youth need to be community leaders and mobilize other young people to be successful. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Dario Otero: “There’s this core group of youth from 19 to 24. There’s a gap there that we try to focus on.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “I’m trying to tap into that untapped potential that so many overlook.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “We started think-tanking with companies.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “To allow young people to step into their brilliance, you need to facilitate that energy.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “The kids just flourished.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “The system of school didn’t understand what we were doing.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “If you’re doing business in 2018, you need a visual.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “I didn’t know I was a social entrepreneur. I didn’t know they had a name for it.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 “That even exchange back and forth is where the magic happens.” Dario Otero @YouthLens360 Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Youth Lens 360: https://www.youthlens360.com Youth Lens 360 on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Youth-Lens-360-275988726216944/ Youth Lens 360 on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/youthlens360 Youth Lens on Twitter: https://twitter.com/YouthLens360 Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


The Empowerment Bag: A Bag to End Human Trafficking, with Vaishali Umrikar
Sep 18 2018 23 mins  
The Empowerment Bag is an eco-friendly brand of bags, that employs women at risk of sex trafficking. Vaishali Umrikar is a passionate social entrepreneur who is committed to fighting human trafficking. While she was in high school, she read the book, The Natashas: Inside the New Global Sex Trade by Victor Malarek. This book awakened her to the realities of modern-day human trafficking. She became involved in anti-trafficking advocacy groups throughout high school and college. Since then, Vaishali has worked with the Australian Government Office for Women, Chicago Probation Sex Offender Unit, and Chicago Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation. After graduating from college and beginning her corporate career, Vaishali realized her passion was to end human trafficking. So, she decided to launch her own business. She thought of several product ideas. But it was when she couldn't find an ethical and affordable line of bags, she decided to create one herself. The project became The Empowerment Bag. The Empowerment Bag is a brand of practical & eco-friendly bags that empower survivors of sex trafficking. The bags are made by women at risk of exploitation in West Bengal, India. These women are given an alternative to the sex trade through literacy training, sewing skills, and employment with fair wages. Five percent of sales go to New Light, a nonprofit that provides shelter, education, and healthcare to trafficked women and their children. The Crowdfunding Campaign The Empowerment Bag is crowdfunding on Indiegogo until September 27, 2018. Crowdfunding allows people to purchase the bags at up to 35% off retail price. After the crowdfunding period ends, the bags will be available at regular price on The Empowerment Bag website or through authorized retailers. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Vaishali Umrikar: “Our bags are made by women at risk of sexual exploitation in West Bengal, India.” “A big part of The Empowerment Bag is breaking the cycle of exploitation.” “That made me feel powerful about the immigrant experience.” “Whatever you do in life, do it with all your passion.” “I always had this feminist push in me, even before I knew what feminism was.” “Something did not feel right about not being treated the same.” “I wanted to do something more meaningful.” “I was missing that passion and that fire that I had all through high school and college.” “I started listening to podcasts and reading books about being your own boss.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: The Empowerment Bag on Indiegogo: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-empowerment-bag/x/4581013 The Empowerment Bag website: https://theempowermentbag.com The Empowerment Bag on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theempowermentbag The Empowerment Bag on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theempowermentbag Common Objective: https://www.commonobjective.co New Light: http://www.newlightindia.org UpWork: https://www.upwork.com


Come to a Live Taping of Social Entrepreneur
Sep 06 2018 2 mins  
Acara + Four Leading Social Entrepreneurs + YOU = Social Entrepreneur Live! Do you want to be at a live taping of the Social Entrepreneur podcast? We're partnering with Acara, a program of the Institute on the Environment and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. Together, we're interviewing four world-changing entrepreneurs, live in front of an audience. Imagine, four entrepreneurs, fifteen minutes each, answering the questions that you care about. At the end of the night, we'll reassemble entrepreneurs on the stage to take your questions. Step up to the mic and ask them anything. The event will take place during Twin Cities Startup Week on Wednesday, October 10, from 6 PM - 7:30 PM. We will be at the West Bank Auditorium, Wiley Hall, Room 20. The address is 225 19th Avenue S, Minneapolis, MN. But, you'll need a ticket. Seating is limited, so grab your ticket today. Here's how you get into Social Entrepreneur Live! First, order a Twin Cities Startup Week ticket on Eventbrite. NOTE: You'll have to do this before you can sign up for the scheduled events. Following that, you will be prompted to create a Sched account. With your new Sched account, you can sign up for the Social Entrepreneur Live event. (Again, you can't start doing this until you have a ticket.) Browse the schedule and add other events to your Sched calendar. Spread the word! The best way to ensure you have a seat is to grab your ticket now. In the next few weeks, as we announce each of our four guests, we expect more tickets to be sold. But, seating is limited. Don't miss this fun night with four changemakers. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Twin Cities Startup Week: https://twincitiesstartupweek.com TCSW Tickets on Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/twin-cities-startup-week-2018-tickets-49338984230 Social Entrepreneur Live! http://sched.co/G7C1 Acara: http://acara.umn.edu










Hope, Cookies, and the End of Relationship Violence, with Junita Flowers, Junita’s Jar
Jul 02 2018 19 mins  
Junita’s Jar donates a portion of their profits to end relationship violence. One year ago, Junita Flowers said, “Clarity comes while you are working.” And, she is always working. So, it comes as no surprise that she launched a new brand, Junita’s Jar. They offer new products, including 3 oz snack packs. She has a new overarching message, #HopeMunchesOn. And her new job title is “Hope Muncher in Chief.” Still, she remains true to her mission. She brings hope to women experiencing relationship violence. “Junita’s Jar is focused on creating meaningful conversations that foster education and awareness around relationship violence,” Junita explains. A portion of profits from each purchase of Junita’s Jar cookies is donated to support education and awareness initiatives leading to the end of relationship violence. Social Entrepreneur Quotes by Junita Flowers “We believe in the power of really good food and desserts to bring people together.” @JunitaLFlowers “Our overarching message is ‘Hope munches on!’” @JunitaLFlowers “It was survival mode.” @JunitaLFlowers “It’s the clarity and the focus of being on the other side of trauma.” @JunitaLFlowers “We are a cookie company on a mission.” @JunitaLFlowers “Our goal is to be purveyors of hope.” @JunitaLFlowers “Everybody wants to be heard. And everybody wants to be validated.” @JunitaLFlowers “That’s the movement that I want to be part of creating.” @JunitaLFlowers “Even in the smallest of crumbs, goodness still exists.” @JunitaLFlowers “I believe we’re all born with this purpose.” @JunitaLFlowers “Usually, purpose comes from that place that we’re not the expert.” @JunitaLFlowers “Say yes to the uncomfortable things, because that’s where the bulk of lessons are and that’s where your courage appears.” @JunitaLFlowers “Be prepared to pivot, but never quit.” @JunitaLFlowers “You have to trust your gut so that you can live with your decision.” @JunitaLFlowers Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Junita Flowers’ interview from July 2017: https://tonyloyd.com/179 Junita’s Jar: https://junitasjar.com Junita’s Jar on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/junitasjar Junita’s Jar on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/junitasjar Junita’s Flowers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JunitaLFlowers Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book






Elisa Birnbaum, Author of “In the Business of Change: How Social Entrepreneurs are Disrupting Business as Usual”
May 28 2018 23 mins  
In the Business of Change features stories of changemakers who use the power of business to address society’s most pressing problems. Elisa Birnbaum is the publisher and editor-in-chief of SEE Change Magazine, a digital publication of social entrepreneurship and social change. You may recall her interview from June 2017. Elisa has a new book out, In the Business of Change: How Social Entrepreneurs are Disrupting Business as Usual. The book highlights how social entrepreneurs are using business savvy to create change in their communities. Elisa tells stories from a wide-range of sectors, including employment, food, art, education, and social justice. Each chapter focuses on lessons learned and measurable impact. The book provides practical tips for starting and scaling a social enterprise. Social Entrepreneur Quotes by Elisa Birnbaum: “It’s part storytelling and part lessons for those who want to start their own social enterprise.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “It’s for the average person who wants inspiring storytelling.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “Look at all of this amazing work being done.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I wanted to provide a broad spectrum of people doing things in different sectors.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “The book has actually been on my mind for a long time.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “It’s good to tell stories in different medium.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “You want to get these stories out there in as many ways as you can.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “This was a lot more strategic.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “There were a couple of chapters that ended up changing.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “You have to be flexible.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “Social entrepreneurs are taking a bigger role in systems change.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I didn’t start writing until I had a contract.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I had a book on my mind for many years.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “People don’t get to see the grit, the passion, and the work that goes into it.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “These stories, I find so inspiring.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag “I enjoyed the process more than I imagined I would.” @ElisaBirnbaum @SEEChangemag Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: In the Business of Change: How Social Entrepreneurs are Disrupting Business as Usual: https://amzn.to/2ILp2OA Elisa Birnbaum’s previous interview on Social Entrepreneur: https://tonyloyd.com/storytelling-platform-social-entrepreneurs-elisa-birnbaum-see-change-magazine SEE Change Magazine: http://www.seechangemagazine.com SEE Change Magazine on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/seechangemagazine SEE Change Magazine on Twitter: https://twitter.com/seechangemag SEE Change Magazine on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/seechangemag In the Business of Change podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/in-the-business-of-change/id1214748429







Used Bikes, Big Impact, with Calla Martin and Mary McKeown, Express Bike Shop
Apr 22 2018 24 mins  
Express Bike Shop is a learning lab where young people develop the habits and skills for work. Today might be a good day to ride a bike. In fact, almost any day is a great day to ride a bike. Biking can be fun. It’s great exercise. It reduces your carbon footprint. The environmental impact of manufacturing and maintaining a bike is far below that of a car. The only thing better than a new bike is a used bike. And the only thing better than a used bike is a used bike that provides jobs for young people with a barrier to employment. Express Bike Shop in Saint Paul, Minnesota is a full-service repair shop that also sells refurbished bikes. Profits from bike sales and repair go towards a youth apprenticeship program. Express Bike Shop is a social enterprise owned by a nonprofit organization, Keystone Community Services. Bicycles are considered hard to recycle items. When you donate a bike to the Express Bike Shop, they either strip the bike down for parts or build the bike up for resell. Since their inception, Express Bike Shop has collected and refurbished more than 20,000 bicycles. They sell between 500 and 600 bikes per years. Components that cannot be reused are recycled. Each year they recycle between 15 and 18 tons of metal and three tons of rubber. 100% of the revenue from the bike shop is reinvested in youth employment programs. The shop serves as a learning lab where young people learn about work and business. They believe that early work experience is the best predictor of later work experience. They have a saying at Express Bike Shop. “The best work readiness program is a job. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Express Bike Shop: http://exbike.com/ Express Bike Shop on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ExpressBikeShop/ Express Bike Shop on Twitter: https://twitter.com/expressbikeshop Express Bike Shop on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/expressbikeshop/ Keystone Community Services: https://keystoneservices.org/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


Make a Living without Losing Yourself, with Sharon Rowe, The Magic of Tiny Business
Apr 09 2018 24 mins  
The Magic of Tiny Business is now available for preorder. Sharon Rowe is a pioneer in social entrepreneurship. She launched her company, Eco-Bags Products, almost thirty years ago. Her company produces ECOBAGS, the original reusable bag. When the daughter of a friend approached Sharon looking for a book on how to launch a business, Sharon looked around and didn’t see what she wanted in the marketplace. Like any good entrepreneur, Sharon decided to fill that gap. The solution is her new book, The Magic of Tiny Business: You Don’t Have to Go Big to Make a Great Living. Sharon first told me about her book exactly one year ago when she first appeared on Social Entrepreneur. You can hear her interview here: https://tonyloyd.com/162 When I asked Sharon who she had in mind when she wrote the book, she quickly responded “Me. Thirty years ago.” She wrote the book that she wishes would have been on the market when she began. Sharon takes on the myths that keep aspiring entrepreneurs from starting. “There are too many cultural myths out there that say; you can’t get started unless you have…this,” she explains. “I wanted to take the cover off the mystery called business.” The book provides practical advice on how to start without becoming overwhelmed. “I wove into this book a lot of takeaways that you can easily and readily apply,” Sharon says. “I wrote it to be accessible, applicable, and fun.” The Magic of Tiny Business is available for preorder today. Quotes from Sharon Rowe “I built a business that fit my life.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “I decided to write the book to get clearer on my why, and then to figure out, how did I do it?” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “Along the way, there was a lot of failures.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “It was time to start sharing what I’d learned.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “There are too many cultural myths out there that say, you can’t get started unless you have…this.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “I wanted to take the cover off the mystery called business.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “It’s a lot of work to get the work you don’t want to do.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “Without profit, you can’t proceed.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “This is not another book about ‘get confident and go.’” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “If you can identify your why, you can stay on the right path.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “You’re going to fail at least 20% of the time, so just let it go.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “It’s not about making a killing. It’s about making a very good living.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “A book, you can share.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “I am still pretty attached to my pen and my paper.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “It’s kind of like a birthing process.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “I wove into this book a lot of takeaways that you can easily and readily apply.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “Preorders really matter.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “I wrote it to be accessible, applicable, and fun.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “It’s about becoming a part of many different communities.” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags “What’s your why?” @sharon_rowe_ @ecobags Social Entrepreneurship Resources: The Magic of Tiny Business: You Don’t Have to Go Big to Make a Great Living: https://amzn.to/2qle2R1 Sharon’s previous interview on Social Entrepreneur: https://tonyloyd.com/162 Sharon Rowe: https://www.sharonrowe.com/ Eco-Bags Products: http://www.ecobags.com





Science and Our Relationship with Nature, with Bonnie Keeler, The Natural Capital Project
Mar 19 2018 24 mins  
The Natural Capital Project is developing practical tools and approaches to account for nature’s contributions to society. As Bonnie Keeler grew up in Eagan, MN, she loved to explore Minnesota’s natural wonders with her family. “My mom was a master at relationships,” Bonnie recalls. “One of the things she taught me was, how people are at the center of everything. Every problem is essentially a problem of relationships. Science can take us part of the way there, in terms of providing the appropriate knowledge base. But when it comes down to actually making change, that’s all about relationships.” Today, Bonnie is a lead scientist with The Natural Capital Project. The Natural Capital Project is a partnership between the University of Minnesota, Stanford University, the Nature Conservancy, and World Wildlife Fund. They solve big problems related with how we value nature, and the relationship between people and the environment. The Natural Capital Project works with a variety of organizations from local community groups who are advocating for a particular environmental future, to private sector companies who are trying to green their supply chain, to national-level governments who are considering the impact of infrastructure. They collaborate with decision-makers to identify questions and develop new science and tools to answer those questions. They test and publish results in peer-reviewed journals. “If you’ve made a big international commitment to the environment, how do we make that practical, and think of the implementation of it?” Bonnie asks. “Where do you protect? What landscapes do you restore? How do you invest in new infrastructure, whether it’s hydropower, or a big agricultural incentive program? Or a payment program to farmers to adopt different conservation practices? Those are big environmental management decisions that have a set of consequences, not just for those ecosystems, but for the people who depend on them.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Bonnie Keeler “We’re so connected to the environment in so many ways.” “The big problem is, those connections aren’t very visible.” “We’re often not thinking of the full set of consequences.” “There is a broad set of users and audiences that our projects serve.” “We have partnerships around the world.” “If you’ve made an international commitment to the environment, how do you make that practical?” “We spent a lot of time car camping.” “My mom was a master at relationships.” “People are at the center of everything.” “It’s the human dimensions that require careful thought.” “I was searching for the connection between people and nature.” “There was a way to be a scientist, but be engaged in those people-oriented, human dimension problems.” “Partnerships are everything.” “Are you reading the environmental page in your local newspaper?” “Find someone who you have the opportunity to be inspired by.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: The Natural Capital Project: https://www.naturalcapitalproject.org The Natural Capital Project on Twitter:https://twitter.com/NatCapProject The Natural Capital Project on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NaturalCapitalProject Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


The Power of a Simple Idea, with Lulu Cerone, LemonAID Warriors
Mar 05 2018 23 mins  
LemonAID Warriors is a youth empowerment program that aims to give young people the tools that they need to turn their compassion into action, and raise funds and awareness for causes that they care about Lulu Cerone was an entrepreneur from an early age. At the age of six, she opened her first lemonade stand. At first, she used the money to buy toys or candy. But her mom made a suggestion. Why not use the profits to help someone else? Lulu looked into it and found an animal shelter that needed the funds. “This really crazy thing happened,” Lulu said. “This crazy thing I was doing with my friends actually took on this whole new meaning. It became a lot more fun. My friends and I became more engaged. We felt like what we were doing was meaningful.” Lulu became interested in community service. However, she had a hard time finding opportunities to serve at a young age. Most organizations require volunteers to be 16 to 18 years-old. She found a few opportunities through her school. Her parents tried helping her to find opportunities. Lulu explains, “It’s hard to know how to raise effective global citizens as a parent.” In 2010, when an earthquake struck Haiti, Lulu was ten years old. She says, “That was the first time I was aware of a global tragedy. I remember being online with my mom and looking at pictures of kids whose lives had been completely changed by the earthquake. I really had this strong urge to help.” When Lulu went to school, she challenged the boys to a Boys vs Girls LemonAID fundraising competition. Her fifth-grade class raised just over $4,000 in two weeks. This early success has had a ripple effect. “I found it spinning out of my control really quickly,” Lulu says. She looked back at what worked with the Lemonade stands and came up with bigger idea – PhilanthroParties. A PhilanthroParty is any gathering with a social purpose behind it. Lulu started an organization, LemonAID Warriors to spread this idea of youth empowerment. She wrote a book, PhilanthroParties!: A Party-Planning Guide for Kids Who Want to Give Back. “This is such a simple idea, but people really latched onto it,” Lulu says. “There is power in simplicity.” Lulu has attracted partnerships for her business. She partnered with Mattel and Forever 21. She was recently recognized as a L’Oréal Woman of Worth. She is currently a freshman in collage as she continues to develop her nonprofit. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lulu Cerone “Growing up, I had a passion for community service.” “Young people can get involved.” “They can do it in fun and simple ways that integrate social action into their social life.” “That’s when I had my first PhilanthroParty.” “It was the first time my friends and I felt like we could be agents of change.” “I did not set out to start a nonprofit organization.” “This is such a simple idea, but people really latched onto it.” “There is power in simplicity.” “LemonAID Warriors is youth-driven and community-based.” “It was incredible being in eighth grade and having Mattel looking to me.” “See yourself as an important agent of change.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: LemonAID Warriors: http://www.lemonaidwarriors.com/ Book: PhilanthroParties!: A Party-Planning Guide for Kids Who Want to Give Back: http://philanthropartiesbook.com L’Oréal Women of Worth:https://www.lorealparisusa.com/women-of-worth.aspx Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


Find Your Funding, Part 2, Cathy Clark, CASE Smart Impact Capital
Feb 26 2018 23 mins  
CASE Smart Impact Capital is a toolkit that helps you to raise capital that aligns with your needs. In 1992, Cathy Clark had a conversation with Lloyd Morrissett, the co-founder of Sesame Workshop. Lloyd told her “Change happens when the right people with the right idea and the right capital come together at the right time.” This idea stuck with Cathy and has guided her career since. When Cathy first appeared on Social Entrepreneur in January 2016, she said. “It isn’t enough to have a good idea, to want to help people, but you have to have an organization to do it, and eventually that organization needs capital. And that has become the theme of my career.” Cathy Clark is the faculty director for the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at the Duke Fuqua School of Business. She runs the Initiative on Impacting Investing. Cathy and the team at CASE have developed a resource to help social entrepreneurs to be more efficient and effective in raising investment capital. The solution is called CASE Smart Impact Capital. It is a toolkit that contains short videos, downloadable resources, spreadsheets, and more. The modules are bite-sized and flexible. You can jump to any section at any time to match where you are on your fundraising journey. CASE Smart Impact Capital was developed over a two-year period, while working with partner organizations such as MIT, Stanford, USAID, Uncharted, and Spring. In this interview, Cathy takes the listeners from the theoretical basis of impact investing through a description of CASE Smart Impact Capital. If you want to jump ahead, leap to 15:50 in the interview. We didn’t get to everything we wanted to talk about, so we’ve put together a short Bonus episode, which you can find here. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Cathy Clark “The term impact investing was coined almost ten years ago.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “Anyone who is investing is taking their dollar and putting it into a capitalist system, where that dollar has an impact.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “It’s basically, people voting with their dollars.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “Anyone who has an investment account is already investing in an outcome.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We live in a finite set of resources. The planet earth is not infinite.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “Unlimited growth within a resource-constrained environment simply does not make sense.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We have to tilt capitalism in a slightly different direction.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “I teach at a business school because I believe business has the largest leverage point.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “At CASE, we call it leaping the chasm. Other people call it the pioneer gap.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “I’ve been looking at this for over 20 years.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “What I saw was completely demoralizing.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We really wanted to build this around the needs of entrepreneurs.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We have a template or a tool, where you make a decision, and you move on.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We wanted to make this modular and easy.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “We created a triage process.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “Most of our entrepreneurs had the wrong list.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact “The stakes are really high.” @cathyhc, @CASESmartImpact Social Entrepreneurship Resources: CASE Smart Impact Capital: https://casesmartimpact.com The Center for Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke University:https://centers.fuqua.duke.edu/case/ Cathy Clark on Twitter:https://twitter.com/cathyhc Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

BONUS Episode: Cathy Clark Talks About Larry Fink’s Letter to CEOs
Feb 26 2018 6 mins  
BONUS Episode: Cathy Clark Talks About Larry Fink’s Letter to CEOs Cathy Clark stopped by to talk about CASE Smart Impact Capital, a rich resource to help entrepreneurs to be more efficient and effective in raising investment capital. While she was here, I took the opportunity to ask Cathy about a letter that Larry Fink, CEO of Blackrock, wrote to CEOs. Blackrock manages $6.3 trillion in investments. In this letter, Mr. Fink said, “To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society. Companies must benefit all of their stakeholders, including shareholders, employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate.” You can read the entire letter here. You can hear the full interview with Cathy where she talks about CASE Smart Impact Capital here. I asked Cathy about this letter, and about the dynamic tension that business leaders sense between shareholders and other stakeholders. You can hear her answer to these two questions in this bonus episode. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Cathy Clark’s full interview: https://tonyloyd.com/235 Larry Fink’s Letter to CEOs: https://www.blackrock.com/corporate/en-no/investor-relations/larry-fink-ceo-letter Cathy Clark on Twitter:https://twitter.com/cathyhc CASE Smart Impact Capital: https://casesmartimpact.com The Center for Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke University:https://centers.fuqua.duke.edu/case/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

Find Your Funding, Part 1, Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation
Feb 19 2018 24 mins  
The Venn Foundation uses Program-Related Investments in surprising new ways. This week, we’re kicking off a two-part mini-series how to fund a business that does social good. We did something like this in April 2016. Next week, Cathy Clark is going to be here to talk about CASE Smart Impact Capital, an online resource to help social entrepreneurs figure out how to find the right capital at the right time. This week, we’re talking to Jeff Ochs of the Venn Foundation. Jeff is an experienced entrepreneur and investor. He invented and commercialized an educational party game that was licensed by Hasbro. He started a successful nonprofit, Breakthrough Twin Cities. And he was the Executive Director of an angel investing network. In each of these instances, Jeff saw the difficulty of getting the right investments to the right startups at the right time. Jeff explains that today there are two types of capital: Charitable donations, which support causes we care about with no expectation whatsoever for financial return. For-profit investments, which are designed to make as much money as possible for investors on a risk-adjusted basis. “In this current capital system, it is obvious why there is no investment capital available that is willing to accept ‘below-market’ financial terms,” Jeff explains. To meet this challenge, Jeff partnered with Rob Scarlett and Jeanne Voight to launch the Venn Foundation. Jeff says, “At the highest level, Venn Foundation has a method for using charitable donations, which today we just give away, to make investments. This allows us to create the below-market investment capital that we badly need. Charitable investments have all the same tax advantages of donations, are anchored against -100% financial returns of donations, and allow the precious charitable donation to be recycled over and over again. Venn Foundation is where charity and investing meet.” Venn is creating a marketplace for charitable investing. They are removing the obstacles that donors face in making charitable investments directly. By opening a special donor-advised fund called a Venn Account, any individual or organization can recommend that their charitable dollars be used by Venn to make Program-Related Investments, or PRIs. Venn can syndicate any PRI among any number of Venn Accounts. Financial returns from these PRIs go back to participating funds for the donors to redeploy into new PRIs or to grant out as desired. Venn recently made a program-related investment to Binary Bridge. BinaryBridge creates software that helps humanitarians do their work effectively and efficiently. You may recall our conversation with BinaryBridge founder Lori Most. Who should seek program-related investing? Jeff suggests that business and nonprofit leaders ask themselves, “Is that I’m doing helping advance a charitable cause as defined by the IRS? And if the answer is yes, or maybe yes, the program-related investment tool is something that could apply to you and your goals.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jeff Ochs “If that kind of capital existed, what could we do?” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “It’s where charity and investing meet.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “Today, there is not a market for charitable investing.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “If capital behaved differently, what would be possible?” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “Capital is the lifeblood of our economy.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation “If we can change the nature of capital, we can change the way our economy works.” Jeff Ochs, Venn Foundation Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Venn Foundation: https://www.vennfoundation.org BackpackEMR:https://www.backpackemr.com Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

Mobile Gaming for Social Good, with Elizabeth Sarquis, Global Gaming Initiative and Jukko
Feb 12 2018 23 mins  
Global Gaming Initiative provides a suite of tools and services to make it easier for game developers and publishers to produce and monetize games for social good. Elizabeth Sarquis was born in a small town along the Magdalena River in Colombia. When Elizabeth was five years old, her family moved to the US. Growing up, she went to school in the US and spent time her summers in Colombia. Elizabeth says “It struck me when I would see children on the streets begging. Then I would go back home, and I would have everything. It didn’t make sense to me.” As an adult, Elizabeth worked in nonprofits focused on children’s issues. During the 2008 financial meltdown, Elizabeth observed how difficult it was for nonprofits to raise funds. And, after the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, she noticed that there was a wide gap between the money raised and the impact of those funds. “I knew something had to change,” she says. “I wanted to create a model that used technology, which I love, and create an impact.” In 2010, Elizabeth’s 14-year-old son traveled to Ecuador to volunteer with a nonprofit. Her son told her a story about a boy he met. The boy did not have transportation, and therefore, did not attend school. Elizabeth’s son challenged her to help. Around this same time, Elizabeth found herself playing Angry Birds for hours. She thought, “Can’t we figure out a way to use games, tied to impact?” From this thought cam Global Gaming Initiative. Global Gaming Initiative is a mobile game company that creates games and aligns them with social impact. They are a cooperative. They work with game developers who want to create social impact through their game. Global Gaming Initiative is a BCorporation. They have been selected as a “Best for the World” company two years in a row. Global Gaming Initiative was not successful right away. They hired eight engineers and animators, spent months on the game, but it was not commercially successful. “We didn’t bring marketing in soon enough,” Elizabeth explains. “At that time, it was a bit more of the wild west in the app store.” One of Global Gaming Initiative’s first successful games was Sidekick Cycle, a competitive retro arcade game that positions players in a race against time. Profits from in-app purchases and advertisement go towards bicycles for kids. The game is popular and has provided lots of bikes. However, parents began to push back on the content of the advertisements. To help control the types of ads that are presented on their games, Elizabeth and her team created Jukko. Jukko connects game players with socially-conscious brands. Jukko is scheduled to launch around April of 2018. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Elizabeth Sarquis “You can make games and you can have an impact.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative “You have to surround yourself with a network of people who believe in what you’re doing.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative “Get involved in your community.” @elizabetsarquis, @GGInitiative Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Global Gaming Initiative: https://www.globalgaminginitiative.com/ Global Gaming Initiative on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalGamingInitiative Global Gaming Initiative on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gginitiative Jukko: https://jukko.com Jukko on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/myjukko Jukko on Twitter: https://twitter.com/myjukko Free Bikes 4 Kids: http://fb4k.org Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book










Community Feasts for a Cause, with Emily Torgrimson, Eat for Equity
Dec 18 2017 24 mins  
Eat for Equity is building a culture of generosity through sustainable community feasts. In the early 2000s, Emily Torgrimson was a college student on financial aid. She lived in a cooperative house in Boston with 24 people. “We always came together around food,” she recalls. “The kitchen was the hub of the home.” During Emily’s senior year, Hurricane Katrina struck the southern US coast. Not only was Katrina one of the costliest and deadliest storms in US history, it also uncovered financial and racial inequities. Emily wanted to do something, but, she says, “I had no money to give. So, I wondered what kind of difference I could make.” Because it was Emily’s turn to cook in her cooperative house, she was looking at recipes, when she stumbled across a recipe for jambalaya. This gave her an idea. She asked her housemates, “If I made a New Orleans themed meal, do you think people would throw in a buck or two for hurricane relief?” Her housemates agreed. They handed out fliers. They invited friends and classmates. In the end, one-hundred people showed up, ate Cajun food and raised money for hurricane relief. They called the event “Eat for Equity.” Eat for Equity eventually became Emily’s life’s work. After returning to Minnesota, Emily began to host Eat for Equity meals with her roommate in their small home. After about a year of monthly meals, a friend, Jane, hosted an Eat for Equity meal. People who knew Jane showed up for the meal. Then Eat for Equity began to grow to more homes, more social causes, and more people who were willing to experience something new. How does Eat for Equity Work? You walk in to a home, an art gallery or a farm. Volunteers have prepared a feast with from-scratch cooking, utilizing local produce. You give what you can. That might be $10 or $50. You might not have money, but you can volunteer to help with dishes or provide music. The meal supports a nonprofit cause. Eat for Equity also hosts dinners called “The Welcome Table,” which is focused on immigrants and refugees. Four cooks are featured in each dinner. Each course reflects their family heritage. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Emily Torgrimson “You walk into abundance.” “How do you use food to bring people together to support a great cause, to address inequities around us?” “I think of Eat for Equity as trying to create connections.” “There are all these ways you can give that feed you and also create something bigger around you.” “You can be generous with what you have.” “You share a piece of yourself when you cook for people.” “I wanted to be part of the story, as much as I wanted to tell it.” “I fell in love with Minneapolis and the culture of collaboration.” “Catering has basically doubled every year.” “Just try something and see how it feels.” “Everything happens around food.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Eat for Equity: https://eatforequity.org Eat for Equity on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/EatForEquity Eat for Equity on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eatforequity Eat for Equity on Twitter: https://twitter.com/eatforequity Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

Fair Trade Coffee from Smallholder Farmers, with Lee Wallace, Peace Coffee [ENCORE]
Dec 18 2017 24 mins  
NOTE: This is an encore presentation of an episode that first aired on July 11, 2016. Advice from Lee Wallace is featured in the book, Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs. To hear the original, extended interview, go here: https://tonyloyd.com/096. Smallholder farmers grow more than half of the coffee consumed worldwide. Imagine if you will, that you are working at a non-profit in Minnesota, focusing on public policy. The phone rings, and the person on the other end says “Hello. This is the Port of Los Angeles. We have 38,000 pounds of green coffee with your name on it. How would you like to pick this up?” You know nothing about coffee or roasting or retail. What would you do? That is exactly what happened twenty years ago at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. In today’s Social Entrepreneur, Lee Wallace, the Queen Bean of Peace Coffee tells us the rest of the story. Peace Coffee is a for-profit social enterprise, owned by a nonprofit, the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. Peace Coffee has a wholesale business that they have been running for about two decades. They also have four retail coffee shops within the Twin Cities, Minnesota. Last year Peace Coffee purchased 735,000 lbs. of coffee from 12 countries and 20 smallholder farmer cooperatives. In the process, Peace Coffee paid $370,000 in fair trade premiums. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lee Wallace “We think hard about how to do the right thing for coffee farmers.” “Our customers named us.” “I was trying to find a career that made sense to me in terms of my passions.” “What I was trying to do was find places that sit at the nexus of mission and money.” “Pretty quickly I realized that this is a magical place for me.” “I have always been interested in how organizations work.” “We spend a lot of our time at work.” “The Twin Cities is an amazing place to learn about natural foods because we have such a vibrant and thriving co-op ecosystem.” “My dad really wanted us to understand the history of industry as it came in and out of communities and how that really impacted families in those communities.” “The original idea was that we would be an importer of all kinds of things.” “More than 50% of the world’s coffee farmers, farm coffee on very small parcels of land.” “We come this work with the sense that, what we’re doing is working on trying to elevate the livelihood of an awful lot of people who historically have been very disadvantaged when it comes to the way trade works.” “It’s livelihood, but its community development too.” “Co-ops are stepping in and playing the role of civil society in these communities.” “People in these communities have ideas and know how they’re going to make their communities better. Our job is to be a good partner on the other side of that.” “We have a price floor…We believe that below this level is unsustainable for coffee farmers.” “This company existing 10 years from now is more important than what is happening this month. This company is bigger than all of us.” “You’d be amazed at who would be willing to talk to you.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Peace Coffee: https://www.peacecoffee.com/ Peace Coffee on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Peace-Coffee-26583664405/ Peace Coffee on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/peace_coffee/ Peace Coffee on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Peace_Coffee Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy: http://www.iatp.org/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book








The Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem Map with Susan Hammel, Cogent Consulting
Nov 20 2017 24 mins  
The Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem Map documents impact investing activity in Minneapolis and Saint Paul. If you would have picked up a copy of the Financial Times last Saturday, you might have noticed a half-page ad asking readers to participate in the Investing for Global Impact research study. Two pages later, you may have also noticed a full-page ad for a report from Principles for Responsible Investing (PRI) on the relationship between the Sustainable Development Goals and investment opportunities. And, you may have caught this interview with Rehana Nathoo of The Case Foundation on their efforts to map this space. Impact investing is a hot topic. According to the World Economic Forum, impact investing “intentionally seeks to create both financial return and positive social or environmental impact that is actively measured.” But, what does impact investing look like in the Twin Cities? Last year, Susan Hammel set about to answer this question. Susan is the CEO of Cogent Consulting and Executive in Residence for impact investing for the Minnesota Council on Foundations. In 2016, Cogent Consulting partnered with the Bush Foundation, the Impact Hub Minneapolis – Saint Paul, and others in the community to map the impact investment space. The result is Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem map. The map consists of three components: sources of capital, companies being funded and intermediaries. The map covers both debt and equity investments. Work on the Twin Cities Impact Investment Ecosystem continues. Cogent Consulting is holding a meeting on November 28, 2017, “What's Next for Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem?” Click here for details. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Susan Hammel “Entrepreneurs really need patient capital to fuel their great ideas.” @susan_hammel “If it is intentional and measured, it is an impact investment.” @susan_hammel “Where is all this money going? Could any of it being going to good purposes?” @susan_hammel “We don’t think there is a deal flow problem we think there is a deal mismatch problem.” @susan_hammel “The Investees sometimes go to the investors and ask them for things they will never do.” @susan_hammel Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem: https://minneapolis.impacthub.net/impact-investing-ecosystem Upcoming event, “What's Next for Twin Cities Impact Investing Ecosystem,” https://www.eventbrite.com/e/whats-next-for-twin-cities-impact-investing-ecosystem-tickets-39456629842 Cogent Consulting: http://www.cogentconsulting.net Bush Foundation: https://www.bushfoundation.org Impact Hub Minneapolis – Saint Paul: https://minneapolis.impacthub.net Minnesota Council on Foundations: https://mcf.org Susan Hammel on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/susan-hammel/ Susan Hammel on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cogentconsultinginc/ Susan Hammel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/susan_hammel Book: The Impact Investor: Lessons in Leadership and Strategy for Collaborative Capitalism: http://amzn.to/2xZcbTF Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book




Everyone Deserves Healthcare, with Grace Garey, Watsi [Encore Presentation]
Nov 13 2017 24 mins  
NOTE: This is an encore presentation of an episode that first aired on March 6, 2017. Grace Garey and Watsi are featured in the book, Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs. To hear the original, extended interview, go here: https://tonyloyd.com/157. Watsi is on a mission to provide healthcare for every person in the world. A billion people around the world do not have access to basic healthcare. And, for those who are fortunate enough to have access, the cost of healthcare can create a life-crippling financial burden. Watsi enables anyone to directly fund life-changing healthcare for people around the world. You can go to their website, see photos and read stories of patients. You can donate as little as five dollars. All the donated money goes directly to the patient. Donors receive updates throughout the funding process. Once the patient’s healthcare is funded, donors receive updates from doctors and healthcare workers. Donors experience full transparency from the donation to the impact. Since launching four years ago, visitors to the site have raised $7.5 million to provide healthcare for more than 10,000 patients in 24 countries. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Grace Garey “We believe everyone deserves healthcare.” @gracegarey, @watsi “A billion people around the world don’t have access to basic healthcare.” @gracegarey, @watsi “It’s all through a network of local medical partners.” @gracegarey, @watsi “When you support a patient, by default, 100% of your donation goes to support that patient’s care.” “My parents are both progressive people who raised me and my sister to care about the rest of the world, outside of our bubble.” “When people are safe and healthy and have access to the basic things they need, they make good decisions and they make the world around them better.” “We started working on Watsi on nights and weekends.” @gracegarey, @watsi “We just started.” @gracegarey, @watsi “We employed the generosity of a lot of people who were excited about the idea.” “We really didn’t know if it would work or not.” @gracegarey, @watsi “We started with almost no systems.” @gracegarey, @watsi “Our initial goal was that we would fund healthcare for ten patients in the first six months, and we did it in the first six hours.” “I didn’t know what Y Combinator was.” @gracegarey, @watsi “We were more like the for-profit startups than we were different.” @gracegarey, @watsi “When we got to YC, everyone was thinking really big.” @gracegarey, @watsi “We told them that we wanted to change global health and they did not blink an eye.” “They assumed it was worth trying.” @gracegarey, @watsi “There are now a dozen or so non-profits and social ventures who have gone through Y Combinator. They’ve all meshed this idea of making an impact with the idea of reaching scale.” “Up to 40% of health funding is lost to inefficiency.” @gracegarey, @watsi “The hardest part throughout this whole journey is just scaling as a person.” “Everyone talks about what it takes to scale your startup, but you also have to scale.” “You have to get used to being really bad at your job most of the time.” @gracegarey, @watsi Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Watsi: https://watsi.org Watsi on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Watsi.org Watsi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/watsi Watsi on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/watsi Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book











A Second Chance at Childhood, with Jenny Bowen, OneSky
Oct 09 2017 23 mins  
One Sky is an international NGO that works with governments and communities to help the most disadvantaged and marginalized children. Jenny Bowen is a storyteller. In this interview, she tells the story of OneSky. I would also suggest that you pick up Jenny’s book, Wish You Happy Forever: What China’s Children Taught Me About Moving Mountains. Because Jenny tells the story so well, I recommend the audiobook. It seems like a simple concept. When children interact with loving parents, they learn…well, they learn everything. They learn a sense of self. They develop language and mobility and curiosity and so much more. But, not all children are so lucky as to have loving parents. In some extreme cases, children are neglected. They can wither and eventually die. In 1996, Jenny Bowen and her husband Dick read an article about Children’s Welfare Institutions, or orphanages. They sat in stunned disbelief as they learned the mortality rate of children in these orphanages was upwards of 85%. They were moved to help, but they were not sure what exactly to do. It was Dick who first suggested that they could adopt one of the children and bring her home. In 1997 Jenny and Dick adopted Maya from a Chinese orphanage. When they received their daughter, she suffered from parasites and dysentery. She was emotionally vacant. Jenny says that she did what any mother would have done. She loved her daughter, interacted with her, read to her and paid attention to her. Maya’s development was subtle at first. But one year after adopting Maya, Jenny watched Maya play in the garden with other children. Jenny said to Dick, “It’s so easy…why don’t we do that for all the kids we can’t bring home?” She knew that she had to go back to China to help other vulnerable children like Maya. Jenny’s story is one of incredible perseverance. She focused on solutions. She flowed like a river around immovable objects. When people did not say no, she took it as a yes. She transcended political, cultural and language barriers to find what was accessible to everyone: the love of children and the desire to see those children prosper. Today, Jenny is the CEO and Founder of OneSky. She sees the problem of child development as a global problem. She says that about one-half of all children in the world will never reach their full potential because they don’t have access to the resources and love they need. OneSky for all children currently operates in China, Vietnam and soon, Myanmar. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jenny Bowen “We focus on low resource communities.” “It’s so easy why don’t we do that for all the kids we can’t bring home.” “It wasn’t easy…Everyone told me that it would be impossible.” “I couldn’t have done what I have done if I did not feel absolutely driven.” “Our mission has grown to focus on what is universal in all children.” “We were certainly living comfortable lives, and maybe we could save one life.” “I knew what I had to do. I just knew it.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: OneSky: https://onesky.org/ OneSky on Twitter: https://twitter.com/oneskyorg OneSky on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/onesky.org OneSky on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneskyorg/ Book: Wish You Happy Forever: What China’s Children Taught Me About Moving Mountains: http://amzn.to/2xzyBNL Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


Making Technology Fun, Relevant, and Accessible for Girls, with Betty Gronneberg, uCodeGirl
Oct 02 2017 24 mins  
uCodeGirl offers pathways to technology careers for teen girls by tapping into their curiosity, skills, and potential. Betty Gronneberg grew up in Ethiopia. She attended Addis Ababa University where she majored in statistics. Betty recalls a day in college when she saw her name on a list of students who had been accepted into the new Computer Science track. She was one of two female students on the list. This was 1991. The “world wide web” had not yet been invented. Betty learned to write simple programs in BASIC, an early computer language. Betty’s experience grew rapidly as the internet began to spread. She became a country-wide email administrator for Ethiopia. In 1995, she became the first webmaster for the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa. With each new assignment, Betty noticed that she was one of the few women in the room. In 1995, 37% of computing jobs went to women. Since women make up half of the population, that’s bad news. And, the news is getting worse. Today, according to Betty, “Nationally 18% of the technology sector is made up of women.” Betty began to ask a fundamental question. “In this great United States, where everything is possible, why are there not many women?” According to Betty, girls begin to lose interest in technology around middle school, when the girls are around 12 or 13 years old. They don’t see the relevance of technology in their everyday lives. Betty began to imagine an organization that helps young girls to apply technology in a fun environment. To help her work out the details of this new organization, Betty applied for and became a Bush Fellow with the Bush Foundation. From the beginning, as she was filling out her application for the Bush Fellowship, she began to refine her ideas. Through her experience with the Bush Foundation, she formed a new organization, uCodeGirl. uCodeGirl is a Fargo, North Dakota based nonprofit that focuses on building confidence and talent for young girls between the ages of 12 and 18, and to inspire them to pursue opportunities in technology. uCodeGirl is making technology fun, relevant, and accessible. Girls learn leadership skills and an entrepreneurial mindset. Leading women in technology provide mentoring. uCodeGirl also helps girls to learn hands-on skills. They provide a three-week summer camp where the girls can experiment with technology to solve their own problems. In the process, they help the girls to build a pathway to a career in technology. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Betty Gronneberg “We want to go to the young girls where the divergence happens and cultivate their confidence.” “Nationally 18% of the technology sector is made up of women.” “It’s like nothing changed, but everything changed.” “I have always been resourceful and resilient.” “We want to help young girls to see technology as a solution for real-world problems.” “We want to cultivate their confidence.” “When you exude that passion, it’s easy for people to say, I’m here to help. What can I do?” “Not everybody is an early adopter of your idea.” “Be okay with no.” “It takes all of us to be a tech savvy generation.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: UCodeGirl: http://www.ucodegirl.org/ UCodeGirl on Twitter: https://twitter.com/uCodeGirl UCodeGirl on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/uCodeGirl/ Bush Foundation: https://www.bushfoundation.org Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

Connecting Buyers and Suppliers of Aid Supplies, with Stephanie Cox, The Level Market
Oct 02 2017 24 mins  
The Level Market is the premier marketplace for aid and relief supplies. Stephanie Cox grew up looking at National Geographic with her grandfather. “I knew I wanted to travel the world when I was 6, 7, 8 years old,” she explains. After graduating from college, she traveled the world as a freelance journalist. In 2004, she had a near death experience during the Boxing Day Tsunami that killed more than 230,000 people. She worked in Nepal and in Eastern Europe during times of conflict. But, she found it difficult to make a living. Her family encouraged her to return to the United States to find her way forward. Stephanie moved to Colorado to attend graduate school. While there, she pitched an idea to iDE, a global organization that creates market-based solutions in agriculture, water, and sanitation. Stephanie offered to travel to Tanzania to document the impact of iDE’s efforts. Using her skills as a journalist, Stephanie says “I spent three months in the back of a pickup truck.” Her efforts paid off. She landed a full-time role with iDE, where she remained for 13 years. In 2014, ten years after the Boxing Day tsunami, Stephanie received a call from a colleague in Sierra Leone. He shared how difficult it was to find aid and relief supplies. Stephanie offered to help. Although she had many connections in the aid and relief space, she also struggled to find supplies. She compared her experience with finding relief supplies with her experience shopping on Amazon or Alibaba. She knew that there had to be a better way. Stephanie thought, “If no one’s going to do it, a single mom in her PJs will do it.” That was the genesis of The Level Market. The Level Market connect buyers and suppliers of products such as solar lights, shelter, and cooking stoves around the world. The Level Market’s site allows government agencies, relief agencies, and nonprofits groups to purchase goods for those on the front lines. According to Stephanie, “They can come to our site and find quality, top notch aid supplies.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Stephanie Cox “Today, we’re in the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II.” “We were looking at the problem of discovery and distribution.” “There was never a hub to connect buyers and suppliers of these products.” “It was a fragmented and broken industry.” “We were very specific as to who could sell their products on our marketplace.” “I always wanted to be the first female president.” “I knew I wanted to travel the world when I was 6, 7, 8 years old.” “I was always interested in words, ideas, and communication.” “I was in Eastern Europe during the time when it was very unstable.” “I grew up in a family where my mom was a Democrat, and my dad was a Republican.” “I spent three months in the back of a pickup truck.” “They can come to our site and find good quality, top notch aid supplies.” “I got to understand the pain of entrepreneurship.” “If no one’s going to do it, a single mom in her PJs will do it.” “Get your heels firmly in the mud.” “If you do donate find out specifically what it is that they need.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: The Level Market: https://www.thelevelmarket.com/ The Level Market on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thelevelmarket The Level Market on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thelevelmarket The Level Market on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/9318912/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book


One Million New Change Creators, with Adam Force, Change Creator Magazine
Sep 25 2017 25 mins  
Change Creator is a platform for motivated social entrepreneurs who are ready to create solutions to the world’s problems. What would it take to produce one million new change creators per year for the next 10 years? That’s the question that Adam Force, Amy Aitman, and Keisuke Kubota of Change Creator Magazine sat down to answer. The result of that question is a new strategy. Change Creator Magazine is a multimedia platform empowering forward-thinking change creators and established enterprises to drive social progress. Their mission centers around three of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They focus on SDG 1, No Poverty; SDG 6, Clean Water and Sanitation; and SDG 7, Affordable and Clean Energy. According to Adam, “People want to make a living doing something that matters, aligning their capital to values.” Adam thinks of Change Creator Magazine as an ongoing form of mentorship. They interview social entrepreneurs and global icons to learn about their strategies, how they get their ideas, and how are they scaling. Some examples of notable figures featured in the magazine are Tony Robbins, Dale Partridge, Ariana Huffington, and Guy Kawasaki. Based on reader surveys, Change Creator Magazine is changing technology platforms, creating an improved reader experience. The magazine uses responsive text for mobile and desktop. Also based on this feedback, they are featuring more stories of every day social entrepreneurs. “There is so much more we want to offer people in to help them along their journey,” Adam says. To take on additional changes, Change Creator is launching a crowd funding campaign. This will allow them to create new educational and consulting offerings. They will be able to offer virtual summits, speaker series, and online courses. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes “They want to make a living doing something that matters to them.” “One of our key values is collaboration.” “The magazine is an ongoing form of mentorship.” “We extract these insights and we put them in the magazine.” “We’re doing the heavy lifting and saying, here are the strategies.” “Our focus is listening to our audience and giving them the interviews they can’t anywhere else.” Amy “We want to put out awesome content that has value.” Amy “The more you dig through, the more value you find.” Amy “What are we providing people to give them the outcomes they’re looking for?” “We’ve developed a crisp vision called our brand network.” “We have six new channels that we will be rolling out.” “Phase one is crowdfunding to start development of the next program.” “Our point is building a community.” Keisuke Kubota “We want to create 1,000,000 change creators a year for the next 10 years.” Amy “Really put yourself out there to build relationships.” “Don’t think that just because you put a strategy together that if it doesn’t work your done.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Change Creator Magazine: https://changecreatormag.com/tonyloyd Change Creator Magazine on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Change_Creator Change Creator Magazine on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/changecreator/ Change Creator Magazine on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/change_creator/ Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book

Clean Water, Powered by Gravity, with May Sharif, AguaClara
Sep 25 2017 21 mins  
AguaClara designs gravity-powered water treatment plants for low-income communities around the world. According to May Sharif, Founder and Managing Director of AguaClara, “More than one in ten people around the world don’t have access to clean drinking water on tap.” When people don’t have access to clean drinking water, adults lose time at work and children miss school. They suffer from illness and or even death. “Up to two million people die each year due to waterborne disease,” May explains. “Most of them are children under five.” By providing access to clean drinking water, people prosper and children learn. Conventional water treatment plants typically do not last more than two years in rural and remote communities. They require skilled technicians and proprietary parts to run and to be maintained. AguaClara has a different approach. AguaClara develops community-scale, non-electric water treatment systems. The systems are designed to be operated by a person with a sixth-grade education and are powered entirely by gravity. They use local materials and local labor to build and maintain the systems, creating a sustainable solution. AguaClara has its roots at Cornell University. In 2005, Dr. Monroe Weber-Shirk worked with Salvadoran refugees in Honduras. He noticed the lack of access to clean drinking water. He saw that there were water treatment plants, however the plants did not work. As he investigated the cause of widespread failure of water treatment systems in poor communities, he discovered that the systems built in these communities were not designed for the communities. Working with graduate students, he and the team designed a series of technologies for off-grid water treatment. May Sharif became involved in AguaClara as a student. She joined the summer internship program and developed designs for the program. “That was my first exposure to the developing world and what water can mean to an entire community,” she says. May pursued a Master’s of Engineering degree and continued to work on AguaClara as her project. After graduation, Dr. Weber-Shirk asked her to continue to work on AguaClara. In 2013, May and fellow graduates of the Cornell AguaClara program formed AguaClara LLC, a social enterprise. AguaClara currently has 14 systems in Honduras serving 65,000 people, four systems in India serving 2,000 people and a new plant is being built in Nicaragua. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Maysoon Sharif “More than one in ten people around the world don’t have access to clean drinking water on tap.” “Conventional water treatment plants don’t last more than two years in remote and off-grid communities.” “We put out designs that are open-source.” “Me being there and working on designs wasn’t translating into new projects happening.” “Gravity-powered water treatment works, and it works well.” “Our partners worked on commercializing it for us.” “It’s a certified BCorporation.” “Yes, you can find people to trust but also learn to develop an eye for who you can trust.” “When we leave, we want to make sure they’re taking care of it.” “Fail fast.” “You have no way of predicting what’s going to happen.” “Put your plan in place and be ready to throw it out the window.” “I make it a point not to get married to anything I create.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: AguaClara: http://www.aguaclarallc.com AguaClara on Twitter: https://twitter.com/aguaclarah2o AguaClara on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aguaclarallc/ AguaClara on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/3560610 Certified BCorporation: http://www.bcorporation.net Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: https://tonyloyd.com/book









Reducing the Carbon Footprint of the Internet, with Jack Amend and Matthew Reid, Web Neutral Project
Aug 28 2017 25 mins  
The Web Neutral Project is a comprehensive certification program that calculates, offsets and neutralizes the carbon footprint of websites and digital products. Matt Reid and Jack Amend have known each other almost all of their lives. They grew up just down the street from one another. Matt attended the University of Minnesota where he studied Environmental Science. Jack attended the University of California, Santa Barbara where he studied Political Science. While in school, Jack ran a graphic design and web development company as a side-hustle. After school, Jack and some friends put together a creative agency with a focus on cause-driven organizations. Jack’s company used solar-powered servers to run their company. When some of their customers asked for a way to tell the story of solar-powered servers, Jack hit upon an idea. Could he provide a certification program for the internet, much like LEED certification for buildings? To figure this out, he reached out to Matt. The IT sector consumes 10% of all global energy, and it’s growing. IT produces more greenhouse gasses than the entire global aviation industry. With an additional 3 billion people expected to come online, it is critical that we think of the carbon footprint of our global presence. The Web Neutral Project offers a certification for carbon-neutral websites. They offer solar-powered web hosting. And, they can help you optimize your web page design, reducing energy consumption. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jack Amend and Matthew Reid “It’s something that’s unknown to the general public.” “The average person who uses the web isn’t aware of the effects it is having.” “The footprint of the internet is about 50% larger than the global aviation industry.” “The average website in a year produces about 4,700 lbs. of CO2.” “The infrastructure of the internet is dependent on fossil fuels.” “There is an issue with green washing.” “Something I like about the entrepreneurial experience is getting to learn new things all of the time.” Matt Reid “Echoing Green has been a huge validation of what we’re working on.” “I didn’t know almost anything about entrepreneurship.” Matt Reid “Try to manage your expectations.” Jack Amend “Be ready for the long grinding days where you feel like you do so much, but not gotten too far.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Web Neutral Project: http://www.webneutralproject.com Web Neutral Project on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/webneutralproject Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/book


Style with a Purpose, with Hamilton Perkins, Hamilton Perkins Collection
Aug 21 2017 25 mins  
Hamilton Perkins Collection is a certified B Corporation, offering designer travel bags at an affordable price. Each bag is made from 100% recycled plastic bottles and lined with vinyl from repurposed billboards. Hamilton Perkins found his niche early with retail sales. During university, he had a sneaker business on eBay. He made and sold leather bags. After college he entered financial services, rising through the ranks at Bank of America and Merrill Lynch. Yet, he had an entrepreneurial itch. So, he enrolled in an MBA program at William & Mary while working full-time. Not only was Hamilton working full time while pursuing his MBA, but he also had a side-hustle business creating leather bags. To make sure he was creating something that customers would want, he conducted over 1,000 customer interviews. Hamilton describes his strategy, “I spent every break, and every lunch and every happy hour with a customer throughout business school.” One of the key learnings was that consumers wanted their purchases to have a social impact. “A lot of people want more out of the companies they support,” Hamilton explains. Hamilton consumed a lot of water from plastic bottles. “I saw what eight plastic water bottles every day for a week looked like,” he says. Hamilton researched and found a company, Thread, that makes material out of water bottles. He found a source of used billboard vinyl. He put them together into a prototype bag. To test interest in the bag, they set up an event at a new art gallery and invited potential customers. That evening Hamilton gave a 90-second speech. That night they received a couple dozen orders. This gave them the confidence to move to a Kickstarter campaign. They launched the campaign with a goal of raising $10,000. They hit their goal in under a week. With the upcycled billboard liner, each bag is unique. But, Hamilton says, “We’re not making a bag that is eco-friendly and crafty. It’s eco-friendly and stylish. It starts with style, then it’s quality, and then it’s impact.” For every Hamilton Perkins Collection bag, they use material from 17 plastic bottles. The inside is lined with one square yard of upcycled billboard vinyl. Customers have responded. “We just need to make the product,” Hamilton says. “Once we make it, it sells out.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Hamilton Perkins “Everything I was trying to do was pointing me in the direction of ‘Why don’t you go start a company?’” “A bag came to me because I needed it. I wanted to travel.” “No two bags are ever exactly the same.” “It’s cleaning up the environment. It’s also providing dignified income opportunities.” “The real business plan was, would people buy it?” “We wanted to make a product that mattered.” “I learned a whole lot about patience in the first six months.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Hamilton Perkins Collection: https://hamiltonperkins.com NOTE: Use “socialentrepreneur” as a discount code. You’ll get $10 off your first order. Hamilton Perkins Collection on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HAMILTONPERKINS Hamilton Perkins Collection on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HamiltonPerkins Hamilton Perkins Collection on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hamiltonperkins Hamilton Perkins Collection on Snapchat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/hamiltonperkins Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/book

Using Your Professional Skills to Volunteer, with Ann Herzog-Olson, Social Venture Partners, Minnesota
Aug 21 2017 24 mins  
Social Venture Partners is a nonprofit that uses the venture capital model to help other nonprofits build capacity and grow. Sometimes you want to do more. It might feel satisfying at the moment to march and chant. But does the impact last? You can donate money to social causes, and that’s important. But sometimes, it feels like you want to do even more. One trend in philanthropy is engaged philanthropy. Engaged philanthropy recognizes that you have more than financial capital to give to a cause. You also have intellectual capital and social capital. You can use your skills and experience to help a nonprofit. You have a network of connections which can benefit a nonprofit. Social Venture Partners allows individuals and corporations to practice engaged philanthropy. There are 42 Social Venture Partners affiliates around the globe. Social Venture Partners, Minnesota is one of them. They focus their efforts on serving youth. The partners at Social Venture Partners identify potential nonprofits to target. They look for nonprofits that are emerging early stage, with some proof of concept. Ann Herzog-Olson, the Executive Director of Social Venture Partners Minnesota says, “We focus on nonprofits who have a vision of where they want to go and look like they’re emerging. Then we help them build a capacity building plan.” The individual and corporate partners at Social Venture Partners stick with the nonprofit for three years as they build their capacity. In some cases, the nonprofit wants to serve more youth. In those cases, Social Venture Partners help them to scale. In other cases, the nonprofits want their existing programs to be more effective. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Ann Herzog-Olson “Youth are kind of lost in the middle.” “Social Venture Partners is focused on building capacity.” “We look for nonprofits that are directly serving youth.” “It’s what we call engaged philanthropy.” “It’s skilled expertize, professional expertize, that we provide to the nonprofits.” “We usually get about 30 to 50 applications, and we select just one nonprofit.” “We walk alongside them.” “It’s highly strategic skilled volunteers.” “We use revenue as a proxy.” “They double their revenue in three years.” “We expect our partners to become involved and volunteer their time.” “It’s sophisticated volunteering.” “We train people to use their skills to help a nonprofit in a strategic way.” “We are impacting more teens as we add more partners.” “Development’s really about the donor.” “They need to have a vision of where they want to take their organization.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Social Venture Partners, Minnesota: http://www.socialventurepartners.org/minnesota Social Venture Partners, Minnesota on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/svpminnesota Social Venture Partners, Minnesota on Twitter: https://twitter.com/svpminnesota Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/book

Product Packaging with a Purpose, with Lindsey McCoy, Plaine Products
Aug 14 2017 25 mins  
Plaine Products helps reduce single-use plastics by producing natural, vegan shampoo, conditioner, and body wash in returnable, reusable containers. In 2013, Lindsey McCoy was living in the Bahamas and running a non-profit called Save the Bays. “I had zero interest in going into business,” she told me. “I was going to save the world.” As she explored the islands, she noticed the impact of single use plastics. “Without regular trash pick up, you see those water bottles, flip flops and plastic bags in the water and along the side of the road,” she explains. “To me, single-use plastics is one of those things that once you start to notice it, you realize it’s everywhere.” Lindsey tried to reduce her personal use of plastic. But she found it difficult to find plastic-free alternatives to shampoo, conditioner, and body wash. “It began to occur to me that there was a way to solve this by going outside of the non-profit community Providing a product might be a better solution.” When she returned to the United States in 2015, she and her sister, Alison Webster, went to work on the problem. Together, they formed Plane Products. Plaine Products produces natural, vegan shampoo, conditioner & body wash in returnable, refillable, reusable containers. When a customer empties a Plaine Products bottle, they order a replacement. They place the empty bottle into the box and return it to Plaine Products to be sanitized and refilled. It took Lindsey and Alison almost two years from idea to product launch. They had to find a contract manufacturer who produces natural products. They needed to work with someone who would be willing to refill bottles. And, they had to figure out their non-plastic packaging. At first, they tried steel containers, but the containers rusted. When they switched to aluminum containers, they found that the packaging not only lasted, but it was lighter to ship, saving costs. And, they had to figure out how to explain the concept of reusable packaging. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lindsey McCoy “Once you start to notice it, you realize it’s everywhere.” “I’m lazy. I’m busy. Making shampoo in my tub was not going to work for me.” “Our addiction to convenience and dispensability seems only to be growing.” “There will be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050.” “As far as we know, no one is doing this.” “We were doing something totally different, and that made it even harder.” “We tried some terrible products.” “You can be small and still mighty.” “Progress not perfection.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Plaine Products: https://www.plaineproducts.com/ Plaine Products on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/plaineproducts Plaine Products on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlaineProducts Plaine Products on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/plaineproducts Plaine Products on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/plaineproducts Book: Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs: http://amzn.to/2hqn9xx


Investing in, Connecting and Celebrating Social Entrepreneurs, with Sally Osberg, Skoll Foundation
Aug 07 2017 25 mins  
The Skoll Foundation drives large-scale change for the world’s most pressing problems. They invest in, connect and celebrate social entrepreneurs. Sally Osberg’s reading early in life shaped her outlook. “I was reading biographies of people like Eleanor Roosevelt, and Jane Adams, and people who convinced me that you could make a pretty powerful difference in the world. And somehow that seeped into my consciousness and gave me a real sense of agency, and I could be meaningful in the scheme of trying to make the world a better place.” Sally is the President and CEO of the Skoll Foundation. She describes what they’re looking for this way. “We look for the convergence of an innovative idea; a great innovator with the determination and wherewithal to stay at this work; and an inflection point where there is sufficient evidence that this idea works.” Jeff Skoll founded the Skoll Foundation in 1999. Jeff was the founding president of eBay. Jeff’s vision is a more peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world. In 2001, he reached out the Sally to help him create a different kind of philanthropy. Each year, the Skoll Foundation recognizes four to six changemakers who are ready to scale their impact. They invest in these changemakers through the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship. Awardees receive a $1.25 million investment over three years. They also gain access to a global community of innovative leaders and who are solving the world’s most pressing problems. “We’re looking for a proven track record,” Sally explains. “We’re looking for a truly pressing global problem…And then this inflection point. Is the team in place? Is the evidence in place? Is there a discipline in place? Is there a great board?” The Skoll Foundation connects social entrepreneurs through the annual Skoll World Forum. They video, document and share the stories of these changemakers. Sally has announced that she will be soon stepping down from her role at the Skoll Foundation. As she looks back and forward at the same time, she reflects on the world as she sees it. “The challenges have never seemed so complex and massive in scale. And yet, the upwelling of talent and interest and goodness from people… I look at young people and see this incredible determination to tackle these problems and not make a choice between doing good, making a difference and a viable career. And I believe that holds so much promise.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Sally Osberg “We partner with social entrepreneurs and celebrate the impact of their great ideas.” “I tried to channel his DNA, which is fundamentally entrepreneurial.” “Our mission is our strategy: Invest, Connect and Celebrate.” “There are great solutions out there. We just have to open our aperture to find them.” “People think of social entrepreneurs as lone rangers. They are anything but.” “We first and foremost are trying to be a good partner to the social entrepreneurs.” “We can help to amplify, accelerate and strengthen, how all this comes together.” “I plan to continue working with people who want to make a difference in the world.” “I believe the empowerment of women and girls holds major promise for the world.” “It is not a moment for us to descend into cynicism or despair.” “I see this aspiration in young people around social entrepreneurship.” “That combination of expertise and humility…is a critical piece.” “Develop some area of expertise.” “Think about social entrepreneurship different.” “Learn about a social entrepreneur who is making a difference on an issue that they care about.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Skoll Foundation: http://skoll.org Skoll Foundation on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SkollFoundation Skoll Foundation on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skollfoundation Book: Getting Beyond Better: How Social Entrepreneurship Works: http://amzn.to/2hdyBwm





183, Lori Most, BinaryBridge | Improving the Effectiveness and Efficiency of Humanitarian Missions
Jul 24 2017 25 mins  
BinaryBridge creates software that helps humanitarians do their work effectively and efficiently. Lori Most grew up seeing television commercials of humanitarian crises, especially in Africa. Lori recounted, “I always wanted to go to Africa and help…I thought ‘I’m going to grow up and go over there.” In college, she started as a pre-med student. Part way through she switched to engineering. “I changed directions a lot,” she laughed. When she graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in mathematics, she was left with this sense that she still wanted to help. After graduating, Lori quickly found work in the booming field of software development. She worked as a software developer, business analyst and product manager with well-known brands such as UnitedHealth Group, Target, and C.H. Robinson. She felt like the work she was doing was important, but she says, “It wasn’t quite the mission I was looking for.” Lori thought about working with a nonprofit. She explored several opportunities. Eventually, her sister introduced her to a humanitarian medical mission working in Peru. Lori accompanied the mission to Peru where she observed organized chaos. The medical team saw between 80 and 100 patients per day. As the patients moved from the intake room to the exam room, to the checkout areas, the patients were tracked with paper records. Paper records are easily misplaced or mishandled. They lack instant access across a caregiving team. They can be illegible, causing medical errors and slowing down care. Medical professionals on humanitarian missions have had to rely on paper medical records, until now. Walk into almost any medical clinic in an industrialized country, and you’re likely to be greeted by a person behind a computer screen. With a few key strokes, the receptionist can pull up your complete medical record. Modern clinics depend on electronic medical records or EMR. EMR provides many benefits. Records are instantly accurate and complete. Health workers can effectively diagnose patients, reduce medical errors, and provide safer care. EMR provides coordinated, efficient care, improving productivity. backpackEMR allows medical professionals in the field to instantly input, update and share patient data. They use a custom-built peer-to-peer network to share data in remote areas where no internet access is available. backpackEMR works as an app on a tablet or with web-based access. BinaryBridge charges a minimal fee to keep the software running. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lori Most “I changed directions a lot.” “My philosophy on software…is get the best of the best and make sure it’s right the first time.” “Get a technical co-founder.” “Accept help from other people.” “Support your local social entrepreneurs.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: BinaryBridge: https://www.backpackemr.com BinaryBridge on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Binary_Bridge

182, Zach McGill, Perk Health | Improving the Health of People and Companies
Jul 24 2017 23 mins  
Perk Health is a website and app that helps you pick up healthier habits in a way that is sustainable. Zach McGill and Doug DeBold grew up playing sports. Games taught them so much: achievement, competition, leader boards, point scoring, rewards, rules of play, self-expression, socializing, mastery, and status. When it was time for college, Doug went off to college in Vermont while Zach attended the University of Minnesota. Initially, Zach studied engineering. He wanted to invent things. But, he says, “I realized, with engineering, there would be less inventing and lot more equations.” So, he started studying entrepreneurship. “It became clear to me that my path was going to be to start and build companies.” Zach built side businesses while he was in school. He became involved with the Acara Institute at the University of Minnesota. He traveled to New Delhi where he and a team developed a business plan to build a small biogas plant. The proposed plant would reduce greenhouse gasses while providing reliable access to electricity. As Zach’s project in India came to a close, he had a decision to make. Did he want to move to Delhi and pursue his business idea, or did he want to grow another side project he had, Perk Health? He chose Perk Health. And to help him grow and scale it, he partnered with his childhood friend, Doug DeBold. Perk Health helps individuals to develop healthy habits. If you look back 100 years ago, people in the United States died mainly of influenza, pneumonia, and tuberculosis. Today, Americans die primarily from lifestyle diseases including heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. 73% of Americans don’t get the recommended amount of physical activity. Inactivity, diet, and obesity kill more people in the US than any communicable disease. As a result, 86% of our healthcare spending can be traced back to these lifestyle factors. Employers who use Perk Health can lower healthcare costs, increase productivity and decrease absenteeism. Perk health delivers their products through a virtual system, which can be cost effective. The Perk Health app retains over ten times the engagement of traditional wellness programs. Perk Health tailors the program to each individual, making it easy and fun to participate. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Zach McGill “We looked at things that change people’s behavior in the real world.” “How can we flip those mechanisms on their head and use them for good?” “How do we get people to focus on small actions, and follow that up with rewards?” “We looked at things that worked for us.” “To get to the beginning, you have to go back to Junior High.” “I was bitten by the entrepreneurial bug.” “A business can be not only a vehicle for profit but a vehicle for good.” “You can do good and do well.” “It’s something we’re really passionate about.” “I knew I wanted to do something that was impactful.” “I realized that, if I wanted to do anything well, I needed to focus.” “Just get started.” “The reality is, there is no ah-ha moment.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Perk Health: https://www.perkhealth.me Perk Health on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PerkHealth Perk Health on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/perkhealth


181, Marcus Owens, NEON | Sustainable Community Development through Entrepreneurship
Jul 17 2017 25 mins  
Northside Economic Opportunity Network, better known as NEON, provides entrepreneurs in North Minneapolis with business development services. Marcus Owens is a product of North Minneapolis. He grew up there, graduating from North Community High School. He bought his first home there. Then his second. He says, “I always wanted to find a way to give back to this community.” Marcus has long been an entrepreneur, operating real estate and financial services businesses. He also worked at a regional bank and a large retailer. He ran a small nonprofit. By 2012, he was looking for more ways to give back to the community. He found his way to the board of NEON. Two years later, he took over as the CEO. NEON works with low- to moderate-income entrepreneurs to build wealth and develop a sustainable community. They offer training and coaching. They also provide access to capital and access to markets. Their coworking space is on West Broadway in North Minneapolis. Marcus says that “We’re trying to revitalize [North Minneapolis] in a way that provides the people that are here with ways to bring themselves out of poverty.” Marcus and board developed innovative ways to fund NEON. Though NEON is a nonprofit, they have several streams of revenue. Marcus explains, “It’s not enough to just give services away. You’ve got to create affordable options for folks to work with you, and bridge the gap where the market does not exist today.” To give small businesses access to the market, NEON has two incubator programs. One incubator is centered around the business of property maintenance. NEON owns a property maintenance business and aggregates smaller subcontract work. They develop these subcontractors with business development skills. They also have a partnership with Twin Cities RISE to provide personal development. NEON also runs a food business incubator program. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Marcus Owens “We saw North Minneapolis as a key area to provide development services.” “We saw that the way to develop assets was through small business ownership.” “We wanted to give people a gateway to start a business.” “We have about 42% of our residents in poverty.” “We’re building a community of entrepreneurs together.” “What problem are you solving and who are you solving it for?” “We have a great partnership with Fredrikson & Byron.” “I always wanted to find a way to give back to this community.” “There is no difference in nonprofit and for-profit in how you should operate.” “How do you innovate in a space that has not been innovated in a long time?” “How can you start it today?” “Think about how you’re spending money. Are you spending it in your community?” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: NEON: http://neon-mn.org NEON on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NEON.MN NEON on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NEONBusiness



178, Kristen Womack, Hack the Gap | Hacking the Diversity Gap
Jul 10 2017 23 mins  
Hack the Gap is a weekend event where women come together to build a project as a team. Kristen Womack is a bona fide techy. She worked as a product manager for some well-known tech companies. She runs Night Sky Web Co. And she has been involved in the local tech scene from Geekettes to Mpls MadWomen. And yet, as she attended hackathons, she couldn’t help but notice the lack of women. “When I went to the bathroom, there was no line,” she told me. The diversity gap in tech has been widely reported. The problem starts early in life. In a recent survey, only 0.4% of teenage girls plan to major in computer science. Only 6.7% of all women graduate with a STEM degree. According to a study by MIT, about 20% of undergraduate engineering degrees are awarded to women, and only 13% of the engineering workforce is female. According to Google’s annual report, only 31% of its employees are women. Worse still, Hispanic workers account for only 4% of their workforce, and black employees make up only 2%. Kristen and Jenna Pederson of Hack the Gap believe that, while there is a problem with getting more women in the tech pipeline, the problem goes deeper. Tech has a culture problem. Kristen says that “We fundamentally believe that, if we increase the pipeline of women and girls who are interested in technology, they are going to enter a world where they could potentially drop about due to death by a thousand cuts.” A recent New York Times article painfully documented the culture of sexual harassment in the tech industry. Male founders of tech companies have come to a slow realization that their practice of hiring from within their network has caused them to exclude talent from diverse backgrounds. Kristen points out that the problem is multifaceted. “We have to fix every part of the journey from childhood to adulthood for women in technology.” That’s a big undertaking, Kristen acknowledges. “So, we decided to focus on this one particular segment of adult women.” Hack the Gap is a weekend event where women come together to build a project as a team. During the weekend, women can become more confident in their skills, or learn a new skill. Not all the women who participate in Hack the Gap are coders. Some have skills in project management, marketing or other skillsets. The Hack the Gap event strengthens the community of women business leaders. Kristen says, “We have seen several women come out of our hackathon and go on to continue with the business from what they built at Hack the Gap.” Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Kristen Womack “There is a need for everyone at the hackathon.” “12% of all engineers are women.” “The problem is multifaceted.” “How do we show the rest of the community what these women are doing, and elevate them even more?” “There are more men named John who are CEOs of Fortune 500 companies than there are women CEOs.” “We might have more diversity in technology if we had more women in hiring positions.” “These women are bringing real-world problems into the hackathon, and building tech that will solve those problems.” “Testing your idea in the smallest state possible is really key.” “You start to see patterns when you start small.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Hack the Gap: https://www.hackthegap.com Hack the Gap on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HackTheGap Hack the Gap on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HackTheGapLLC Hack the Gap on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hackthegap Kristen’s company, Night Sky Web Co.: http://nightskyweb.co Jenna’s company, 612 Software Foundry: https://www.612softwarefoundry.com Book: Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career: http://amzn.to/2syJF7T “Women in Tech Speak Frankly on Culture of Harassment,” New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/30/technology/women-entrepreneurs-speak-out-sexual-harassment.html

177, Katherine Milligan, Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship | The World’s Largest Network of Late-Stage Social Entrepreneurs
Jul 03 2017 28 mins  
The Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship is the sister organization to the World Economic Forum. They manage the world’s largest network of late-stage social entrepreneurs. Katherine Milligan says, “I have always been deeply touched by the inequities of the world.” She spent time in the Peace Corp. She lived in a village in Benin without running water or electricity for two years. While there, she saw first-hand how an international shift in the commodity price of cotton had a significant impact on local cotton farmers and their families. “It opened a deep curiosity in me to understand why the conventional ways of delivering solutions to these populations where failing.” Her curiosity led her to pursue a Master’s degree in Trade and International Development. This was followed by two years as a Research Fellow, traveling the world and interviewing stakeholders from ambassadors and trade representatives to the WTO and farmers. She says that this study gave her an appreciation for how complex problems are. “When you know very little about a problem, it’s very easy to see it in a black and white way and to propose a simplistic solution. When you dig into it and you understand the complexities of it, that’s when you appreciate just how challenging and complex these problems are to solve.” Katherine’s search for solutions to large, complex global problems led her to the World Economic Forum in 2005. In 2009, she took over the lead role for the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship. The Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship is the sister organization to the World Economic Forum. They manage the world’s largest network of late-stage social entrepreneurs. They elevate the work of late-stage social entrepreneurs on the platform of the World Economic Forum. The Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship was launched in 1998 by Klaus Schwab, founder of the World Economic Forum and his wife Hilde. Their initial goal was to introduce the work of social entrepreneurs on a global stage. At the time, the concept of social entrepreneurship was mostly unknown. Each year the Schwab Foundation recognizes several social entrepreneurs through a “Social Entrepreneur of the Year” competition. This year they selected 17 social entrepreneurs from 13 organizations. These social entrepreneurs become part of the broader Schwab Foundation community of more than 300 entrepreneurs to exchange expertise and experiences. They are also fully integrated into the World Economic Forum’s events and initiatives, giving them a global presence and visibility. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Katherine Milligan “When you get that kind of spotlight and exposure, it changes the dynamics and resources come to you.” “I’ve always been deeply touched by the inequities in the world.” “When you know very little about a problem, it’s easy to see it in a black and white way.” “You have to log those hours.” “We need a reality check on the problem spaces.” “Know your strengths.” “Surround yourself with people who compliment your skills.” “This is a really challenging path.” “Understand the role of self-care.” “If you let the cause consume you, what good are you to the cause?” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship: http://www.schwabfound.org Free Report: Beyond Organizational Scale: How Social Entrepreneurs Create Systems Change: http://www.schwabfound.org/content/publications Book: Innovation and Scaling for Impact: How Effective Social Enterprises Do It: http://amzn.to/2u6eK4A Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship on Twitter: https://twitter.com/schwabfound Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/schwabfound/




174, Eric Sannerud, Mighty Axe Hops | Experimenting within an Ecosystem
Jun 26 2017 19 mins  
Mighty Axe Hops is using experimentation to create an ecosystem within an ecosystem. Eric Sannerud is an experimenter. He tries small experiments, gathers feedback and then adjusts. For example, in 2013, he was graduating from the University of Minnesota. At the same time, he had several irons in the fire. He was part of a team that launched Twin Fin, an innovative urban farm start-up, growing fish and greens in a city warehouse. At the same time, he was involved with the Famers’ Legal Action Group (FLAG). He was also involved with Urban Oasis, the winner of a $1 million Forever Saint Paul Competition to create a sustainable food center on the East Side of Saint Paul. And, he cofounded the Sandbox Center for Regenerative Entrepreneurship. And, in his spare time, he managed to co-found Mighty Axe Hops, building and leading a new industry in Minnesota. Eric explains, “There’s a sliver in your life where your commitments and your personal life might not be as stringent as they tend to grow to be, and I wanted to make full use of that time.” He talks about the importance of an experimental mindset. “They were all really low-risk. As they begin to grow, you try to commit more resources to the ones that look like they will bring better results.” Eventually, Eric began to focus his efforts. “That time of being involved in many things, I’m really shrinking it down to just being involved in the things I want to be involved with.” Today, he spends his time growing Mighty Axe Hops. He and his co-founder Ben Boo have grown their operations from 20 plants to a new 80-acre farm. Mighty Axe Hops is creating a hops-growing ecosystem in Minnesota. Where no hops industry existed before, a cottage industry of inputs, processors, marketers, farm implements is beginning to grow. The hops industry is an ecosystem within an ecosystem. The rise of craft beer and microbreweries gives rise to the need for local hops with unique flavor profiles. Not only is Mighty Axe Hops creating an ecosystem, they are growing within the fertile ground of the Minnesota social good ecosystem. They started as a student-led start-up, launched during the Acara program at the University of Minnesota. Eric is also a member of the local Global Shapers Community and is an active member of the Impact Hub, Minneapolis-St. Paul. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Eric Sannerud “I was looking for something that would or could become a job.” “I was involved in a number of startups through late college and just after college.” “It boils down to, I want to make a difference with my life.” “At that phase of my life, I was just saying yes.” “I know what I want to do for the next five years.” “That was the little money we needed to put more proof behind our concept.” “Our main goal is to create a vibrant Minnesota hops industry.” “It never felt sharky.” “I think the reason I like entrepreneurship is because of how challenging it is.” “We’re directly measuring water quality and soil health.” “The thing that helped me the most was learning to just do it.” “Start something and try something, but in a smart way.” “I always approach it like a scientific hypothesis.” “Test as many of your assumptions in your business plan as possible, with the least amount of risk.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Mighty Axe Hops: http://www.mightyaxehops.com Mighty Axe Hops on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MightyAxeHops Mighty Axe Hops on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MightyAxeHops Mighty Axe Hops on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mightyaxehops


172, Evva Kraikul, GLITCH | Equipping Emerging Game Makers with Tools for Success
Jun 18 2017 25 mins  
GLITCH promotes the exploration of digital games as a culture, career and creative practice. If I were to tell a joke about Evva Kraikul, it might go something like this “A game designer, a neuroscientist and an entrepreneur walk into a bar. She ordered herself a drink.” Evva brings her experience in game design and neuroscience to the startup world where she is the cofounder of GLITCH. Evva was an extraordinarily early adopter of technology. At the age of four, she was interested in all things digital. She used a laptop to explore online. When she was ten-years-old, she set up a website and sold Beanie Babies. Her first online transaction was for $1,000. She built battle simulators in AOL chat rooms. She is a true digital native. Evva’s parents encouraged her to be either a doctor or lawyer. “Those seemed to be my only two options,” she remembers. She pursued her degree in neuroscience at the University of Minnesota, but her interests in all things digital would not let her go. She looked for local resources for emerging game makers but found none. Evva and fellow student Nic VanMeerten set up programs and events. They invited gaming industry insiders to give lectures and workshops. Fellow students were enthusiastic, paying to attend these events. With this proof of concept under their belts, Evva and Nic were awarded a $45,000 grant to continue their work. This work eventually led to the startup, GLITCH. GLITCH supports emerging game makers through a series of ongoing programs, events, and residencies. GLITCH recently began providing small grants to game makers who are doing interesting work. By supporting emerging game makers, GLITCH is bringing a unique perspective to the gaming industry. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Evva Kraikul “My parents didn’t believe me when the first sale was $1,000.” “There was something missing.” “There weren’t a lot of resources and support for emerging game makers.” “We tested them. We did small programs.” “That’s the most powerful thing – going in open minded.” “My initial ideas change drastically. They aren’t the same as when they started.” “How do we allow people to be vulnerable and talk about the issues they’re facing, in games?” “All you can do is put your design in the world, let people use it, and iterate.” “Everything you put into the world should be a living thing.” “The thing that was the hardest and continues to be most difficult is learning how to lead.” “I’ve been learning how to say yes, and more specifically how to say no.” “I want to support emerging game makers who are doing interesting and innovative work.” “I love games. I don’t love where games are right now.” “Be bold. Be daring.” “Find a community that you’re specifically passionate about.” “Find a problem you’re itching to solve. Jump in and shut it down.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: GLITCH: http://glitch.mn GLITCH on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlitchMN GLITCH on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GlitchMN GLITCH on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/glitch.mn


171, Mark Norbury, UnLtd | The Foundation for Social Entrepreneurs
Jun 12 2017 27 mins  
UnLtd is the UK’s largest supporter of early-stage social entrepreneurs. Mark grew up in the time when Land-Aid, Band-Aid, and Live-Aid were popular. “The idea that you can be a rock star who saved the world was pretty damned compelling when you’re fourteen years old” he confesses. But, with a lack of musical talent, Mark decided to focus on changing the world. As an 18-year-old, Mark volunteered on London’s east side, working with Father Duncan. “He was much more of a social activist than he was a priest,” Mark explains. “He was five-foot-nothing. He was a British-Asian guy who experienced a lot of racial abuse…He also fostered a young kid who had come from an abusive background. And he had a rare blood disorder that caused him to have to take whole body blood transfusions.” During his work with Father Duncan, Mark experienced a world different from his own, from domestic abuse to illiteracy, to the lives of the elderly. “That was where I realized that what I needed to do was to try to make a difference.” After university, Mark worked in non-profits but did not quite find the sustainable model he was looking for. He eventually enrolled at INSEAD where he encountered social entrepreneurship. With social entrepreneurship, he saw the bridge between service and economic sustainability. Mark helped set up INSEAD’s Social Innovation Centre where they introduce and developed new business models that deliver sustainable economic, environmental and social prosperity. He also was a trustee at Bridges Ventures. It was while at Bridges Ventures that he first had contact with UnLtd. In 2016, he joined UnLtd as its Chief Executive Officer. UnLtd has backed over 40,000 individuals over the last 15 years. They provide three levels of awards to early-stage social ventures: Try it, which is £500 Do it, up to £5,000 Grow it, up to £15,000 These awards come with support such as business advice, coaching, mentoring, and peer-to-peer support. UnLtd has also runs the Big Venture Challenge, an award program that provides match funding to help growing social enterprises to raise investment and deliver social impact at scale. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Mark Norbury “Everything we do, the social entrepreneur is at the heart of it.” “I grew up in the Land Aid, Live Aid, Band Aid era.” “UnLtd is a gem, but it’s not realized its potential yet.” “You’ll find social entrepreneurs in these communities making something with nothing.” “They’re creating a micro-conglomerate of brilliance and hope, and it’s all self-sustaining.” “Make it about the people and communities you’re serving.” “Do it in a co-production model.” “Social entrepreneurs don’t always ask for help enough.” “I’m an idealistic optimist.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: UnLtd: https://unltd.org.uk UnLtd on Twitter: https://twitter.com/unltd UnLtd on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UnLtd/ Global Social Entrepreneurship Network: http://www.gsen.global



168, Lisa O'Donoghue-Lindy, She Inspires Her| Stories that Inspire African Women to Start and Grow Businesses
May 22 2017 29 mins  
She Inspires Her is an online and mobile media platform that shares stories about women entrepreneurs in emerging African markets. Lisa O’Donoghue-Lindy was born in Ireland. When she was 12 years-old, she moved to the United States with her family. After college, she went back to Europe working with major corporations in communications roles. Lisa and her husband have lived in South Africa, Greece and Finland. As we spoke, they are in the process of moving to Namibia. Because she has moved so often, she has done work that can be accomplished from anywhere in the world. In 2014, Lisa and a friend launched a side project called Career 2.0. They wrote stories of women who had experience major mid-life shifts. They featured women, mainly from the US and Europe, who had found a way to live a fulfilling life. It was through this work that Lisa wrote a story about Hyasintha Ntuyeko, and entrepreneur from Tanzania. After the story came out, Hyasintha applied for the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) fellowship. She included the story in her application. When Hyasintha was accepted, she wrote an email to Lisa telling her about the difference that the story had made. This had a profound effect on Lisa. “I made a difference in someone’s life,” she realized. It was at this point in 2016, that Lisa pivoted away from Career 2.0 and to open She Inspires Her, focusing on women entrepreneurs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Women in Sub-Saharan African only own about 10% to 15% of formal businesses. They are stuck mostly in the informal economy. Their businesses are not sustainable. They do not create jobs. These businesses cannot scale and grown. For many women in Sub-Saharan Africa, there are legal, cultural, financial and structural barriers that keep them from owning formal businesses. In some cases, local culture reinforces the idea that the woman’s place is in the home. Women often lack access to education. Women can lack access owning property, which can also block access to financing. Highly successful African women entrepreneurs are often featured in Forbes or CNN Africa. And, there are other women who are incredibly savvy at social media who can tell their stories, However, Lisa says “There’s a real dearth of stories of everyday women in markets like Uganda, Rwanda or Tanzania who are not able to get their stories out. And these women are remarkable. My goal is to get these stories out there so that younger women, or even girls, can read them and see themselves in those stories.” She Inspires Her provides role models, connects women to networks, promotes women-owned businesses and raises awareness to barriers to female entrepreneurs. Their main objective is to share relatable stories that get more women to start and grow businesses in Africa. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lisa O'Donoghue-Lindy “You can’t be what you don’t see.” “Small and Medium Enterprises are crucial drivers of job creation.” “In countries like Cameroon and Ghana, SMEs are responsible for more than half of employment opportunities.” “My objective is to get more women out of the informal sector and into formal business.” “It was in working with her that I realized where I could really make a difference.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: She Inspires Her: http://sheinspiresher.com She Inspires Her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sheinspiresher She Inspires Her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sheinspiresher She Inspires Her on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/she_inspires_her

167, Peter Holbrook, Social Enterprise UK | Leading an Economic and Political Systems Shift
May 15 2017 21 mins  
Social Enterprise UK is the membership and advocacy body for social enterprises in the United Kingdom. Peter Holbrook started his career with the retailer Marks & Spencer. He also worked at The Body Shop. In both cases, he watched as values-based companies changed once they became shareholder-driven. Peter wanted to have a social impact with his work, so worked for Oxfam and for Greenpeace. There, he found organizations that were working on purpose but were missing some of the innovation and drive of for-profit enterprises. In 2001, he launched Sunlight Development Trust, a community owned and managed charity. They work in the Medway community in South East England to improve health and well-being. Sunlight Development takes an innovative approach. They house a community café, recording studio, and a community radio station, located next to health services. Peter’s work with Sunlight Development attracted the attention of political parties from both sides of the aisle. Prime Minister Gordon Brown appointed Peter as a Social Enterprise Ambassador. David Cameron visited Sunlight Development on several occasions. Peter was a member of Social Enterprise UK. When the Chief Executive, Jonathan Bland stepped down, Peter was encouraged by a board member to apply for the role. Peter had been at Sunlight Development for more than ten years. The opportunity at Social Enterprise UK seemed like a chance to get back to his entrepreneurial roots. It also gave him an opportunity to work at the system level to create an economic and political shift. In the UK, there are around 80,000 social enterprises with a combined revenue of £27 billion per year. Social Enterprise UK is the national membership body for social enterprises. They conduct research. They run campaigns such as Buy Social and Social Saturday. They develop policy. And they lobby on behalf of their members. One key piece of legislation that was passed with Social Enterprise UK support is Social Value Act. This law requires public authorities to consider the economic, social and environmental implications of contracts. Therefore, instead of only basis government contacts on price and quality, government organizations can look holistically at the impact of their spending. This single piece of legislation can unleash £300 billion in government spending for social good. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Peter Holbrook “I wanted to bring those two worlds together – commercial thinking, to the world of social change.” “I set up an organization without any knowledge of the term social enterprise.” “I understand the value of networks.” “Running a social enterprise can be a lonely experience.” “I’ve always recognized the need for an economic and political shift.” “Enthusiasm is a great substitute for talent.” “Dare to dream.” “You can genuinely achieve great things if you’re not bothered about who takes the credit.” “We can only make the huge change the world desperately needs if we work together.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Social Enterprise UK: https://www.socialenterprise.org.uk Social Enterprise UK on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SocialEnt_UK Social Enterprise UK on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Social-Enterprise-UK-136948359726274 Social Enterprise UK on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/socialenterpriseuk Buy Social Directory: http://buysocialdirectory.org.uk Social Saturday: http://www.socialsaturday.org.uk Social Enterprise Places: http://socialenterprise.org.uk/social-enterprise-places








161, Madeline Di Nonno, Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media | Changing Media to Empower Girls
Apr 03 2017 27 mins  
The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media is a research-driven organization that is changing media to empower girls. While watching television with her daughter, Geena Davis noticed that women were not well represented. She was concerned about the messages that were being sent to her daughter and to her twin boys. Geena launched a research project and was disturbed by what she found. In 2009, Geena met with Madeline Di Nonno, a 30-year veteran of the entertainment industry. Together, they launched the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media. Here is what they found. Women and girls make up 51% of the population and yet, if you watch movies and television, you might not know that. For every minute of female screen and speaking time, there are three minutes of male screen and speaking time. Women make up around 17% of crowd scenes. And only 17% of the top 100 feature films of 2015 featured solo female roles. The kinds of characters played by women are also off-balance. 80% of the characters seen working are male. Women in films make up less than 5% of the C-Suite roles. Men play attorneys or judges 13 times for every time the role is played by a woman. Men play professors 16 times for every time a woman plays the same role. And men play medical professionals nearly 6 times for every time a woman plays the same role. Children consume about 7 hours of television per day. So, media plays an oversized role in influencing their understanding of society. Given the statistics above, children, both boys and girls, are fed a steady diet of messages that women and girls don’t matter to society. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media is a research-driven organization. Through their research, they have amassed the largest body of research on gender prevalence in family entertainment spanning over 25 years. They partnered with Google to create a software that analyses video and audio. The software measures the GD-IQ (the Geena Davis Inclusion Quotient). They research directly to decision makers and creators in the entertainment industry. They collaborate with the media and entertainment industry to expose gender imbalance, identify unconscious bias and remodel characters to achieve equity. In a recent impact study, 68% of entertainment industry executives familiar with the Institute’s research changed two or more projects, and 41% changed four or more projects. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Madeline Di Nonno “The problem is centered around unconscious gender bias.” “Even when there are female leads, they receive three times less speaking time than the male leads.” “Female-led films are earning 16% more at the box office.” “We’re focused on research, action, and results.” “I learned a lot by reading obituaries.” “I thought, could I use my power for good?” “It’s important to do a SWOT analysis.” “Is there another organization that you can partner with?” “Whatever you do has to be measured in finite terms.” “We’re dealing with huge systemic change.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media: https://seejane.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GDIGM Twitter: https://twitter.com/GDIGM Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gdigm/ More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 5, Gender Equality In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In April, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 5, Gender Equality. You can read more about the Sustainable Development Goals here.

160, Yohans Wodaje Emiru, helloDoctor | Bridging Barriers to Healthcare in Ethiopia Through Simple MedTech
Mar 27 2017 22 mins  
Dr. Yohans Wodaje Emiru is the founder of Telemed Medical Services. Their flagship service is helloDoctor. For every doctor in Ethiopia, there are more than 30,000 patients. Compare that to less than 400 patients per doctor in the United States. Millions of Ethiopian patients are cut off from medical services due to geography and infrastructure. There are also cultural barriers to medical treatment. Some conditions can seem embarrassing to discuss face-to-face with a local doctor. Transportation costs or consultation fees may be a barrier to treatment. Yohans Wodaje Emiru has found a way to use technology to provide access to medical professionals using a simple hand-handheld phone. Yohans understands the challenges of medical services in Ethiopia. He graduated from medical school at Addis Ababa University. He worked in several roles, including being the Medical Director of Saint Urael Medical Services in Addis Ababa. He also worked in a remote town in a government hospital where he saw first-hand the challenges of Ethiopians to access medical services. HelloDoctor allows people to call at any time and from anywhere in Ethiopia and get instant professional medical advice. People call, describe their symptoms and a medical professional helps them decide whether to treat their symptoms at home, to obtain an over-the-counter product or to seek further medical services at a local clinic or hospital. For chronic illnesses such as diabetes, HIV or Tuberculosis, helloDoctor also provides Patient-Center Engagement and Tracking Services. HelloDoctor has received over 80,000 calls. They have directly impacted over 50,000 individuals. Between 50% to 65% of the medical conditions are sufficiently handled through the phone calls. The remaining patients have been helped through direct referrals. They also help patients to save money. They calculate that for every phone call received, they save their patients $3 in healthcare expenses. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Yohans Wodaje Emiru “These barriers can be bridged with the kind of service we are building.” “People launching new services is not something people are used to here.” “You have to pull all the strings you can to keep the music going.” “There are challenges you face every day. But if you believe in what you’re doing, it just passes.” “We monitor everything we’re doing.” “The most interesting thing is the money that people are able to save.” “You have to keep measuring. You have to keep talking to your clients.” “The first thing you start out with is, unless you’re very lucky, rarely the right solution.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: helloDoctor: http://www.hellodoctorethiopia.com/ helloDoctor on Twitter: https://twitter.com/8896helloDoctor helloDoctor on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/8896hellodoctor/ More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In March, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about all of the Sustainable Development Goals here.



157, Grace Garey, Watsi | Everyone Deserves Healthcare
Mar 06 2017 37 mins  
Watsi is on a mission to provide healthcare for every person in the world. In March, on Social Entrepreneur, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being. A billion people around the world do not have access to basic healthcare. And, for those who are fortunate enough to have access, the cost of healthcare can create a life-crippling financial burden. Watsi enables anyone to directly fund life-changing healthcare for people around the world. You can go onto their web site, see photos and read stories of patients. You can donate as little as five dollars. All the donated money goes directly to the patient. Donors receive updates throughout the funding process. Once the patient’s healthcare is funded, donors receive updates from doctors and healthcare workers. Donors experience full transparency from the donation to the impact. Since launching four years ago, visitors to the site have raised $7.5 million to provide healthcare for more than 10,000 patients in 24 countries. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Grace Garey “We believe everyone deserves healthcare.” “A billion people around the world don’t have access to basic healthcare.” “It’s all through a network of local medical partners.” “When you support a patient, by default, 100% of your donation goes to support that patient’s care.” “My parents are both progressive people who raised me and my sister to care about the rest of the world, outside of our bubble.” “When people are safe and healthy and have access to the basic things they need, they make good decisions and they make the world around them better.” “We started working on Watsi on nights and weekends.” “We just started.” “We employed the generosity of a lot of people who were excited about the idea.” “We really didn’t know if it would work or not.” “We started with almost no systems.” “Our initial goal was that we would fund healthcare for ten patients in the first six months, and we did it in the first six hours.” “I didn’t know what Y Combinator was.” “We were more like the for-profit startups than we were different.” “When we got to YC, everyone was thinking really big.” “We told them that we wanted to change global health and they did not blink an eye.” “They assumed it was worth trying.” “There are now a dozen or so non-profits and social ventures who have gone through Y Combinator. They’ve all meshed this idea of making an impact with the idea of reaching scale.” “Up to 40% of health funding is lost to inefficiency.” “The hardest part throughout this whole journey is just scaling as a person.” “Everyone talks about what it takes to scale your startup, but you also have to scale.” “You have to get used to being really bad at your job most of the time.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Watsi: https://watsi.org Watsi on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Watsi.org Watsi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/watsi Watsi on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/watsi More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In March, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about all of the Sustainable Development Goals here.


156, Morgan Dixon, GirlTrek | When Black Women Walk, Things Change
Mar 01 2017 35 mins  
GirlTrek is the largest public health nonprofit for African-American women and girls in the United States. Morgan Dixon was a school teacher. As she learned about the statistical probability of chronic disease and early death among her students, she wanted to take action. Morgan knew that walking was a powerful antidote to many of the health challenges faced by those in her community. She began by walking with her students. As satisfying as those walks were, she knew that the solution needed to scale. With her friend, Vanessa Garrison, they used Facebook to organize a 10-week walking challenge. The next year, women came back and asked Morgan and Vanessa to run the challenge again. That’s when they knew they were on to something. As important as walking is, Morgan and Vanessa sensed that they were on to something even bigger. Morgan told me, “We started to look to our history for what happened when black women walked for change?” They connected the movement with the history of black women and civil rights. This was the beginning of GirlTrek. GirlTrek encourages women to use walking as a practical first step to inspire healthy living, families, and communities. They have nearly 100,000 women who participate in their walks, and they are a path to rapid growth. This year they anticipate they will reach 500,000 women and by next year, over 1 million. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Morgan Dixon “I felt like I was uniquely positioned to do this because I was that girl.” “Life felt like a setup for a takedown.” “It has become a neighborhood walk in sneakers.” “We just started with ourselves.” “We did a call to action with just our friends and family.” “We needed a bite-size ask.” “Small waistlines and skinny jeans have never been why we do this.” “They will become the new changemakers in our communities.” “We had 10,000 people before we had funding.” “There’s so much power and changemaking that can happen without huge and bloated budgets.” “If the mom is committed to a lifetime of active, healthy, personal glow, her whole family changes.” “You have to root, to rise.” “What is the level of trauma that creates an entire population of people to feel inactive?” “There were root causes around loneliness and isolation.” “Loneliness is deadlier than cigarette smoking.” “We are building movement tools that are based in our culture.” “That for me feels different, hopeful and constructive.” “I think we have a spiritual muscle and a grit.” “I think we are spiritual warriors in a way that allows us to rise above and stay hopeful when things turn incredibly dark.” “I have the muscle to hope. I have the muscle because my mother has the muscle to hope, and her mother had the muscle to hope.” “I don’t have the stomach for rage.” “You have to be incredibly present and grateful for where we are now.” “It’s OK to make pivots.” “In order to grow, you have to try a bunch of things.” “We can’t afford to be apart at this time. We have to come together in common cause.” “We need you to organize.” “You can organize a team of you and your daughter for the first year.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: GirlTrek: http://www.girltrek.org GirlTrek on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthyBlackWomenandGirls GirlTrek on Twitter: https://twitter.com/girltrek GirlTrek on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/girltrek More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In March, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 3, Good Health and Well-Being. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about all of the Sustainable Development Goals here.

155, Jehiel Oliver, Hello Tractor | Collaborative Consumption for Smallholder Farmers
Feb 27 2017 23 mins  
Hello Tractor is an AgTech company focused on improving food and income security across sub-Saharan Africa through a tractor co-sharing platform. Collaborative consumption is reshaping the world. There are the well-known players. For example, Airbnb rents more rooms than Hilton, Marriott, and InterContinental combined. If you want to get around in a city, you can grab a ride with someone via Lyft or pick up a bike with bike sharing services such as Nice Ride Minnesota. But can collaborative consumption help feed the world? That’s what Hello Tractor is attempting to do. In Africa and Asia, more than 80% of the food is produced by smallholder farmers. These farmers cannot afford to purchase and maintain a tractor. They depend on manual labor to work their land. With a lack of available labor, they often do not fully cultivate their land. Hello Tractor builds low horsepower tractors, suitable for smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. Smallholder farmers can request tractor services by sending a text, just as you might request a Lyft. Hello Tractor is not just building tractors. They have created a technology platform that can be used by other manufacturers to provide services on-demand. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jehiel Oliver “I’ve always been a fan of using commercial markets to reach low-income populations.” “Most people who access microfinance, earn their income on the farm.” “The tractor itself is low-tech, but the technology that supports it is fairly sophisticated.” “We just asked people for advice.” “Our biggest asset is a willingness to put yourself out there and sound really stupid.” “The upside was clear.” “We were always putting out fires. I think that was part of the fun.” “Get started. Just go. You’ll never have it figured out.” “The best learning is not done behind a desk. It’s done out there in the field.” “Be bold with your ideas. Because some of these challenges are so massive.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Hello Tractor: http://www.hellotractor.com/ Hello Tractor on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HelloTractor Hello Tractor on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hellotractor/ Hello Tractor on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellotractor/ More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In February, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about the Sustainable Development Goals here.

154, Vijaya Pastala, Under the Mango Tree | A Hybrid Social Enterprise that Creates Livelihood from Bees
Feb 20 2017 31 mins  
Under the Mango Tree increases agricultural yields by teaching rural farmers to keep bees. Vijaya Pastala and Under the Mango Tree are a good illustration of something that I believe which is, miracles find you while you’re in motion. Vijaya started experimenting with her business idea in January 2009. By January, 2010, Vijaya had 8,000 rupees in the bank. That’s less than $120 USD. At the time, the monthly cost of running Under the Mango Tree was around 34,000 rupees. Under the Mango Tree was gaining positive press, but beneath the surface, Vijay’s personal savings, which she was using to fund the company, were running out. During this crisis, Vijaya received a request for a meeting from a stranger. Given all that she was managing, she considered turning down the meeting. It turned out that the stranger was willing to provide the funds needed to meet their operating costs. By May 2010, Under the Mango Tree won the UnLtd India competition, which provided their first seed investment. Other money was to follow, including support from Acumen. Under the Mango Tree works with marginal farmers, that is farmers who have an income of about $600 per year. They train farmers to transfer wild bees into a bee box. As a result, the farmers increase their productivity, their income and their savings. Under the Mango Tree also helps farmers to gain access to markets for honey and other bee-related products. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Vijaya Pastala “We work with marginal farmers.” “There are only five types of bees that make honey and out of those, there are only two bees that can be boxed.” “It takes a farmer 18 months to become completely at ease with being a beekeeper.” “We are a honey brand in the market in India.” “We have created an ecosystem of beekeeping.” “We train women’s groups to create a swarm bag or a bee veil.” “We’re like a one-stop-shop on beekeeping.” “It’s farmers who are training other farmers.” “Agriculture is something I’ve always worked on.” “I understood the importance of sustainability.” “The hybrid came into being from day one.” “I realized that, in India, we don’t really showcase the origin of the honey.” “When you’re an entrepreneur, it’s on your head – everything.” “Yields are going up 40% to 60%.” “We have trained about 700 women beekeepers.” “We have six women who are training other women to be beekeepers.” “Keep knocking on doors.” “Use your network.” “Don’t be shy in asking for help.” “Set yourself a timeframe.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Under the Mango Tree: http://utmt.in/ Under the Mango Tree on Twitter: https://twitter.com/UTMT Under the Mango Tree on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UTMT.in Under the Mango Tree on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/utmt_honey More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In February, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about the Sustainable Development Goals here.


152, Marion Atieno Moon, Wanda Organic | Food Security through Soil Health
Feb 06 2017 25 mins  
Wanda Organic is a for-profit social enterprise that works with farmers to improve their productivity and profitability by improving their soil. At the age of 28, Marion Atieno Moon quit her job. She wasn’t quite sure what she was going to do next, but she knew there had to be more to life than work and a paycheck. When she returned home to Kenya, she noticed a pattern. As she visited the villages of her childhood, she was expected to bring food. This was a sharp contrast when compared to her travel to other regions where strangers often offered food to her. As she considered the causes of food insecurity, she realized that food production depends on a handful of factors such as climate, water, and soil. Soil has been called “the living epidermis of the planet.” It is the thin membrane upon which all life on earth depends. Marion saw the poor quality of soil as a business opportunity. Challenges with Food Production in Kenya Kenya is a microcosm of the challenges of food production globally. One report estimated that 1.3 million people in rural areas and between 3.5 to 4 million in urban areas are food insecure. The population is growing and becoming more affluent. The cities are encroaching on arable farm land. Climate change is changing soil temperatures and putting pressure on water supplies. And, more importantly, poor farm practices have led to decreased productivity. Wanda Organic educates Kenyan farmers on the important role soil plays in productivity. They sell bioorganic fertilizers that restore soil health. They also help farmers access markets. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Marion Atieno Moon “By focusing on maximizing or restoring soil health, we’re enabling farmers to produce more and better-quality food.” “A lot of the arable land is being taken over by urbanization.” “I felt there must be more to life than working and making money.” “I found a huge gap in soil fertility.” “I learn a lot from the farmers I work with.” “By using our products, farmers are able to increase their productivity by 30%.” “We are able to reduce input costs by about 20%.” “We are currently working with just over 4,000 smallholder farmers, and we have 11 big, corporate clients that we work with.” “People don’t understand how serious and bad this is.” “If you’ve killed your soil, you’ve got to fix it.” “I felt I finally had a seat at the table.” “I realized that I had grown so much.” “I feel my instincts are so much better.” “Resilience and persistence – don’t underestimate what those two can do for you.” “Take soil very seriously.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Wanda Organic: http://wandaorganic.com Wanda Organic on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wandaorganic Wanda Organic on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WandaOrganicKE More Stories of Sustainable Development Goal 2, No Poverty In 2017, we’re emphasizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). In February, we are focusing on Sustainable Development Goal 2, Zero Hunger. You can read more about Sustainable Development Goal 1 here, Sustainable Development Goal 2 here, or learn about the Sustainable Development Goals here.










144, Mario Jovan Shaw, Profound Gentlemen | Male Educators of Color as Role Models for Boys of Color
Dec 28 2016 35 mins  
Profound Gentlemen is having a profound impact on boys of color through social-emotional learning. How do you raise a successful boy of color, in an age of Trayvon Martin and Philando Castile? Boys of Color are four times more likely to receive out of school suspensions as their peers. They are rarely exposed to men of color in the classroom, despite data that shows that having men of color as role models greatly improves the social, emotional, and academic progress of all students, but especially boys of color. More than a quarter of men of color will leave the education profession after their first year. In 2013, Mario Jovan Shaw was a 7th Grade English language arts teacher. He started a group called The Brotherhood which consisted of 12 – 15 boys of color. Some of the boys were struggling with repeated disciplinary problems while others were performing well in school. They met each Wednesday to talk about how to navigate through life as boys and men of color. This was around the time that George Zimmerman was on trial for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin. The students told him, “Mr. Shaw, you are our first educator of color.” This had a profound effect on Mario Jovan. He wrote a letter to the Charlotte Observer, laying out the case for the need for more male educators of color. His letter arrived around the 60th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. So the Charlotte Observer featured his letter. This caught the attention of Jason Terrell who was also doing work in the same area. By July 2015, they launched Profound Gentlemen. Profound Gentlemen is creating a cradle-to-career pipeline for boys of color. They work with educators of color to increase the social-emotional learning for boys of color. Their goal is to retain 90% of the Gentlemen in the field of education. The expect 90% of boys of color in their Gentlemen’s mentoring groups will graduate from high school. And 90% of boys of color in the Gentlemen’s mentoring groups will be exposed to diverse career opportunities. They work with boys of color in student groups and in after-school programs. They help boys of color who live in poverty to overcome the barriers in their lives. Profound Gentlemen gives them a chance to experience opportunities that they might not otherwise be exposed to. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Mario Jovan Shaw “Over 80% of our guys who are Profound Gentlemen, were not education majors.” “We not only want to have a great football player, but we want him to understand how he contributes back to society.” “You have to recognize the reality, but you also have to be optimistic.” “In order for us to win, we have to show gratitude.” “The biggest thing I’ve learned on my journey is continuously evolving yourself and your organization.” “Your mission and vision in the first year, is always evolving.” “Jason and I had to become very, very vulnerable.” “My way is not the only way.” “My biggest advice is, continue to allow yourself to grow.” “Whenever we get into a dark place, we know we’re about to experience major growth.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Profound Gentlemen: http://profoundgentlemen.org Profound Gentlemen on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/profoundgentlemen Profound Gentlemen on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profoundgentlemen Profound Gentlemen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PGeducator






139, Sonja Ausen-Anifrani, SMS Maama | Reduce Maternal Mortality in Uganda
Dec 16 2016 25 mins  
Sonja Ausen-Anifrani and Katelyn Pastick believe that maternal mortality can be reduced by providing the health information that every woman deserves. The founders of SMS Maama met at a course on social entrepreneurship at the University of Minnesota. None of them had experience in being an entrepreneur or building a social venture. The class provided mentors in Uganda. They worked on their idea and, when the class was over, they walked away with a grade and a business plan. But now, they were on the hook. They knew what the problem was and they suspected that perhaps they had a solution. And if they could do something about maternal mortality, didn’t they have to try? Uganda has a maternal mortality rate of 360 deaths per 100,000 live births. While 1 in 44 Ugandan women will die due to pregnancy complications, in many cases, this is preventable. Early health assessments and improved nutrition can dramatically reduce maternal mortality. However, many women in Uganda do not have access this information. SMS Maama uses automated text messages to send pregnancy-related information. They also screen for complications during pregnancy through simple text questions and responses. They are just beginning their pilot project in Uganda. Sonja Ausen-Anifrani tells the story. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Sonja Ausen-Anifrani “These complications are preventable.” “Every woman has the right to accurate information.” “When you’re in the class, you’re working with theory.” “Moving from theory, working in class on a group project, to something real, takes a lot of work.” “You don’t have a structure. You’re creating a structure.” “It takes so much internal motivation.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: SMS Maama: http://www.smsmaama.org SMS Maama: https://www.facebook.com/smsmaama5 Acara Challenge Business Competition: http://environment.umn.edu/leadership/acara/competitions/acara-challenge D-Prize: http://environment.umn.edu/leadership/acara/competitions/d-prize

138, Julius Ibrahim, Second Shot Coffee | Heart, Head, and Hustle to end Homelessness
Dec 14 2016 17 mins  
Julius Ibrahim is tackling homelessness one espresso at a time. In her book, Work on Purpose, Echoing Green alumni Lara Galinsky offers this formula: Heart + Head = Hustle By heart, she means your emotions. By head, she is referring to your skills and abilities. And by hustle…well, every entrepreneur knows exactly what that looks like. Julius Ibrahim is a beautiful illustration of heart, head and hustle. As Julius entered university in Central London, he was confronted daily by those who were sleeping on the sidewalk, in doorways or parks. These folks are referred to as “rough sleepers.” This was a significant “heart” moment for Julius. He wanted to apply his skills to make a difference. He became involved with the organization Enactus. Enactus allows students to take entrepreneurial action for social causes. His skills grew as he took on a leadership role in the organization. It was through Enactus that he helped turn around a social enterprise café. He was hooked. In this role, he had a chance to see a lot of social business startups, including several false-starts of companies who were trying to solve homelessness. Julius took the time to learn more, speaking to people in the homelessness space. He wanted to know what a good solution looks like. Julius has a passion for hospitality. He thought about how could bring his hospitality industry skills to bear to solve the issue of chronic homelessness. In other words, how could he combine his head and his heart to make an impact. Julius started hustling. It took him almost a year to raise the funds to start. He started with a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. Although he failed to raise as much money as he hoped, he did receive a great deal of press and social media attention. This led to private investment funding. Because Second Shot Coffee is a UK-based social enterprise, the investors qualified for a Social Investment Tax Relief. In May, 2016, Julius launched Second Shot Coffee. Charity organizations refer people dealing with homelessness to Julius and Second Shot Coffee. He employs them, trains them as baristas and then transitions them to further employment. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Julius Ibrahim “I was always passionate about hospitality.” “Every day there was just so much rough sleeping.” “That’s when I realized I’m probably not going to go and do the kind of standard career choice.” “The reason homelessness is so persistent is because there is such a lack of understanding about how easy it is to fall into the situation.” “Homelessness is something that happens to someone.” “The average person is two paychecks away from becoming homeless.” “We started with a crowdfunding campaign.” “Every day it’s something new and a new challenge.” “For our model, staff turnover is a good indicator.” “Once people learn what we do, they’re really onboard and willing to help.” “If people are given the opportunity, they will contribute and will try and be part of something more meaningful.” “Find a local social enterprise and support them.” “Everybody has some kind of specialized skill that they’re able to give.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Second Shot Coffee: http://secondshotcoffee.co.uk Second Shot Coffee on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/secondshotcoffee Second Shot Coffee on Twitter: https://twitter.com/secondshotcafe Second Shot Coffee on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/secondshotcoffee Social Investment Tax Relief: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/social-investment-tax-relief-factsheet/social-investment-tax-relief Enactus: http://enactus.org



136, Vivek Maru, Namati | The Rule of Law for Everyone
Dec 09 2016 36 mins  
Namati puts the rule of law in the hands of people. The rule of law is a bedrock of most modern societies. No one is above the law. We are all equal under the law. And yet, more than four billion people live outside of the protection of the law. Their rights are easily violated. They have no right to their land. They are denied basic human rights. They are threatened and intimidated, often by the very people who are supposed to protect them. Vivek Maru learned about social justice from his grandfather who was part of the Gandhian Movement. Vivek wrote his undergrad thesis on Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Malcom X. After college, he received a fellowship to study Gandhian social action in India. He settled in the Kutch district. There he worked on watershed development. Upon returning to law school, he felt conflicted. He considered dropping out. “What I was learning about the law seemed so contradictory to that Gandhian spirit that I admire,” he told me. But he stuck with his studies. By 2003, Vivek made his way to Sierra Leone, just after the end of a bloody civil war that had left more than 50,000 dead. Though the country had achieved peace, most of the civil institutions were weak or non-existent. In the entire country, there were less than 100 lawyers. Most of those were in the capital city of Freetown. Across rural Sierra Leone, people had little recourse for legal complaints. Vivek formed Timap for Justice, training paralegals throughout the country. These paralegals, often referred to as barefoot lawyers, restored the rule of law in many communities. The idea of using paralegals for social justice work is not new. What was different with Timap was that the paralegals coordinated and learned from one another. Eventually the work of Timap was recognized by the World Bank, International Crisis Group and others. In 2011, Vivek began to scale his community paralegal work to other countries. To do so, he formed Namati. Namati helps people to understand, use, and shape the laws that affect them. Namati develops innovative methods that allow grassroots legal advocates to take on challenges to justice. They spread these methodologies through an interconnected coalition of organizers. The organizers share insights and learn from one another. The coalition work for large-scale, system-changing policy changes. Once the policies are passed, the barefoot lawyers work with local communities to bring those policies to life. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Vivek Maru “Three billion people around the world live on lands to which they don’t have legal rights.” “Any big problem you can imagine, law and justice matters.” “Even though we’ve got tons of lawyers, we have an extraordinary crisis in terms of access to justice.” “I was dreaming about social justice since I was a kid.” “What I was learning about the law seemed so contradictory to that Gandhian spirit that I admire.” “There is a way of approaching the law that sets its sites on transformation.” “I have found that even in some of the toughest situations, well-equipped and well-supported paralegals can manage to squeeze justice out of broken systems.” “Study history.” “You might not notice law and justice if you’re not looking for it.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Namati: https://namati.org Namati on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GlobalNamati Namati on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalNamati

135, Gillian Caldwell, Global Witness | The Link Between Natural Resources, Conflict and Corruption
Dec 07 2016 27 mins  
Global Witness investigates and exposes natural resource exploitation around the world. Have you ever wondered why many of the countries that are richest in natural resources, have some of the poorest populations? Countries that are rich in gems, minerals and other natural resources also have persistent poverty. In many cases, this is due to corruption and human rights abuses. How do you break the chain of corruption and abuse? First, it must be exposed. That is what Global Witness does. They document abuses of environmental and human rights. They work for justice for the exploited and they hold the powerful to account. Gillian Caldwell has been thinking about social justice and natural resources since she was in high school, where she was a chapter coordinator for Amnesty International. Before joining Global Witness, she was CEO for 1Sky where she took on climate change. She was also the Executive Director for WITNESS, a platform for documenting violations of human rights. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Gillian Caldwell “Global Witness was one of the first organizations to understand the relationship between natural resource exploitation and environmental and human rights abuse.” “Our work looks at Western enablers of corruption that help impoverish nation states by depriving them of the wealth that their natural resources should be able to generate.” “My teachers were very influential for me.” “From an early age I was thinking in very broad terms about the world around me and what difference I could make in it.” “The process is as important as the destination.” “In an increasingly interconnected world, there is no such thing as an exclusively national concern.” “We just don’t have the luxury to see those problems in separate compartments any longer.” “Some of the most resource rich countries in the world are dealing with grinding poverty, environmental and human rights abuse and corruption.” “Too often companies are shielded and the money itself is shielded by the existence of so-called anonymous companies.” “Tune in to what moves and motivates you.” “Personal sustainability is key.” “This is a marathon and not a sprint.” “The only change that’s meaningful in the world is change that happens through partnerships and collaboration.” “There’s room for people who are passionate enough to chart their own course.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Global Witness: https://globalwitness.org Global Witness on Twitter: https://twitter.com/global_witness Global Witness on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GlobalWitness Global Witness on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/GlobalWitness

134, Verengai Mabika, Development Reality Institute (DRI) | The Climate Change Challenge and Opportunity
Dec 05 2016 24 mins  
Verengai Mabika sees the opportunities created by climate change. Eighty percent of Zimbabwe’s businesses depend on Agriculture. Most agriculture in Zimbabwe is rain-fed. Climate change brings record high temperatures and frequent droughts. When crops fail, so does Zimbabwe’s economy. The droughts, combined with land reform, changed Zimbabwe from a net exporter of agricultural products to an importer of food. There are currently around four million people who need food aid in Zimbabwe. Verengai Mabika has a passion for designing green communities. He was trained as an urban planner with an emphasis on environmental design. In 2009, there was a sharp rise in political violence. Verengai told me, “I was surprised by the way our leaders were taking advantage of young people who had so much energy. I thought I could motivate a few young people to get into a discourse that I believed was very serious and could bring some opportunities for them.” The Development Reality Institute taps into the high number of unemployed youth to address the effects of climate change. They have three key activities. They run a virtual school to build the capacity of people to adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change. They operate the Green Innovations Hub, which is a space with technical and financial assistance for innovative ideas. And they work with young people in school, educating them through their Cool Schools program. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Verengai Mabika “We believe that we can create a generation of social entrepreneurs who can effectively respond to the effect of climate change.” “I believe that the climate change discourse, even though it is one of the greatest challenges, it also offers some huge opportunities.” “I see it as a dual challenge of climate change as well as unemployment.” “The current unemployment rate in Zimbabwe is about 80%.” “What we’re trying to create here is a pathway for young people to think differently when it comes to climate change.” “The Green Innovations Hub is both a virtual and physical space.” “Most of the motivation that keeps me going is the motivation that I draw from my colleagues.” “Persistence and consistency are quite key.” “There’s now compelling evidence that climate change is a huge issue.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Development Reality Institute: http://www.driafrica.org Green Innovations Hub: http://www.gih.space Development Reality Institute on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DRIafrica Development Reality Institute on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DRI.AFRICA


132, Nina Smith, GoodWeave International | End Child Labor with a Market-Based Approach
Nov 30 2016 26 mins  
Nina Smith has been thinking about social justice since she was eight years old. It’s natural that today she is working to end child labor. You might think that child labor is a thing of the past, relegated to black and white pictures from the 1940s. Unfortunate for millions of children around the world, that is not true. According to the Global Slavery Index, 45.8 million people are enslaved in the world today. In the handmade carpet industry alone there are nearly a quarter of a million children who are being exploited. Nina Smith grew up in a Jewish household, where her grandmother taught her the Jewish tradition of tzedakah, or social justice. As an eight-year-old, she was first introduced to her cousin Mark. She was told by her mother and grandmother that Mark would tell her and her sister a story. The story, as it turns out, was the story of the holocaust. “That was the first time I understood about the injustices in the world,” she told me. Nina sees echoes of this injustice in the lives of modern-day slaves. “Very much my childhood influenced the way that I respond to this kind of thing now. People all over the world knew it was happening, the information was there, but people didn’t act soon enough or strongly enough.” She said of child labor, “It’s touching every one of us through the products that we buy.” GoodWeave is transforming the rug industry by certifying child-labor-free rugs. To earn the GoodWeave label, manufacturers must meet certifications standards. They must also agree to random, independent inspections. GoodWeave has freed more than 3,500 children from slave labor. They have reduced child labor by 80% in the handmade carpet industry of South Asia. Children who are rescued, are offered schooling and other basic needs. GoodWeave also prevents child labor by providing opportunities to at-risk children. GoodWeave is expanding their market-based approach to eliminating child labor to new sectors such as apparel, home textiles and agricultural products. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: GoodWeave International: http://goodweave.org Global Slavery Index: http://www.globalslaveryindex.org Target – GoodWeave partnership announcement: https://corporate.target.com/article/2015/09/good-weave-partnership Macy’s – GoodWeave partnership announcement: https://macysinc.com/social-responsibility/socially-responsible-products/default.aspx





128, Steph Speirs and Steve Moilanen, Solstice | Solar for All
Nov 21 2016 27 mins  
Solstice provides access to clean, affordable solar energy for those who have been locked out of the solar market. Today’s conversation with Steph Speirs and Steve Moilanen of Solstice is the fifth in a series on solar power and clean energy around the world. We spoke with Sam Goldman of d.light, a pioneer in solar energy for the developing world. We also spoke with Allison Archambault of EarthSpark International. They provide pre-pay electricity through a mini-grid in Haiti. We spoke to Harrison Leaf of Steama.co who helps mini-grid operators utilize “the internet of things,” wireless connectivity and a platform, primarily in Africa. We heard from Clementine Chambon, Amit Saraogi of Oorja. They are working on rural electrification in India utilizing a hybrid solar and biomass system. Today, we speak with Steph and Steve about why Americans are locked out of inexpensive solar energy and what it is that they are doing about that. How big is the problem? Almost 90 million American households cannot access solar power. Some are renters. Others live on low incomes. Still more live in homes that do not have sufficient direct sunlight. Whatever the reason, millions of households cannot access clear, affordable solar energy…until now. Solstice is transforming the market, using community shared solar. Through Solstice, anyone can subscribe to a solar garden, saving money and the environment at the same time. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Steph Speirs and Steve Moilanen “Solar is cheap enough that everyone can save money using it.” Steph Speirs “Sixteen states that allow for community solar, but the Department of Energy thinks it’s going to be a $16 billion industry by 2020.” Steph Speirs “One of the benefits of community solar is how easy it is.” Steve Moilanen “Think of it like a community garden, but for clean energy.” Steve Moilanen “The number one reason why anyone signs up for solar is because they have a friend or neighbor that went solar.” Steph Speirs “Solar is contagious in personal networks.” Steph Speirs “We’re creating viral communities around community solar.” Steph Speirs “You can switch to clean energy and save money on your electricity bill from day one, at no up front cost.” Steph Speirs “I realized I didn’t have to be halfway across the world to work on energy equity issues.” Steph Speirs “In America, the people who need solar savings the most are currently the least likely to get it.” Steph Speirs “We’re never going to mitigate climate change unless we get more people access to clean energy.” Steph Speirs “The set of thing that you are expected to be competent at as a first-time entrepreneur, is daunting.” Steve Moilanen “We probably got rejected from twenty grant proposals before we got our first influx of money through the Echoing Green fellowship.” Steph Speirs “Entrepreneurs don’t have good days and bad days. They have good hours and bad hours.” Steph Speirs “We want to switch 50,000 households to solar by 2020.” Steph Speirs “In starting something, make sure you’re picking a battle that’s worth fighting.” Steve Moilanen Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Solstice: https://solstice.us Solstice on Twitter: https://twitter.com/solarforgood Solstice on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/solarforgood Solstice on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/solarforgood

127, Clementine Chambon, Amit Saraogi, Oorja | Rural Electrification of India Using Waste
Nov 18 2016 27 mins  
Oorja's biomass and solar-powered micro-grids provide affordable and reliable electricity to off-grid communities in rural India. In India, 450 million people lack access to reliable energy. This has several repercussions including a lack of economic development, poor health outcomes, gender inequity, poor education and more. Without reliable electricity, villagers rely on fossil-fuels such as kerosene and diesel. They spend up to 20% of household income on these dirty sources of power. At the same time, people in rural India produce 200 million tons of crop waste per year. This waste is usually burned in the field, producing greenhouse gasses. Clementine Chambon and Amit Saraogi met in a Climate-KIC workshop in 2015. They developed the business model for Oorja during that workshop. Since then they have worked with and interviewed hundreds of people, fully developing their business idea. Oorja builds and maintains decentralized hybrid solar and biomass-powered micro-grids, producing reliable clean energy across the Indian countryside. Oorja is the project developer and they use a community-ownership model. This provides livelihood opportunities and economic stimulation. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Clementine Chambon and Amit Saraogi “We’re aiming to provide reliable and affordable power to places that currently don’t have access to electricity.” Clementine Chambon “We’re aiming to compete with diesel.” Clementine Chambon “I’ve always had interest in climate change and clean energy solutions.” Clementine Chambon “We identified that waste energy and rural electrification were our common points of interest.” Clementine Chambon “The benefits of this growth and globalization were not really trickling down.” Amit Saraogi “I was a banker, but I knew this was not the right path for me.” Amit Saraogi “I believe good policy that is well-implemented is the need of the hour.” Amit Saraogi “I was lucky to be in the right place at the right time.” Amit Saraogi Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Oorja: http://www.oorjasolutions.org Oorja on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oorjasolutions Oorja on Twitter: https://twitter.com/oorjasolutions Oorja on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oorjasolutions Climate-KIC: http://www.climate-kic.org/for-students/summer-school


126, Harrison Leaf, Steama.co | Connect Mini-Grids to the Cloud
Nov 16 2016 23 mins  
Mini-Grids are a way to connect more than a billion people to electricity and water. We’ve grown used to the idea of “the internet of things,” big data, and wireless connectivity. But can these technological breakthroughs be used to improve the lives of some of the poorest people in the world? And, will that technology work in the most rugged and off-grid places on earth? That’s what Steama.co does. On Social Entrepreneur, we’ve been looking at how the people around the world suffer from energy poverty can move up the energy ladder. When people don’t have access to reliable electricity, they use expensive, dirty fuels to power their lives. This hurts their health while keeping them trapped in poverty. One answer is mini-grids, powered by clean energy sources such as wind and solar. But, mini-grid operators have unique challenges. But how does someone without a bank account buy electricity? How does the utility read a meter, turn on an account or track usage remotely? Steama.co provides smart meters, wireless connectivity and a robust platform utilities can use to manage their system. Steama.co works in some of the most remote places on earth. Utilities can use Steama.co technology to aggregate data and to learn. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Harrison Leaf “My work is my protest.” “We’ve gone out to the bush and designed this in a place where it’s going to be used.” “We’re not the power company. We put the power company’s equipment, via our smart meters, onto the internet.” “It’s autopilot for mini grids.” “Search not just for success, but for failure.” “Apply the scientific method.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: co: http://steama.co


124, Sam Pressler, Armed Services Arts Partnership (ASAP) | Empowering Veterans through Comedy and the Arts
Nov 11 2016 30 mins  
On this Veteran’s Day, we celebrate with Sam Pressler of the Armed Services Arts Partnership or ASAP. What words would you use to describe veterans? Hero? Brave? Or maybe broken or dangerous? How about neighbor, coworker, or community member? Veterans are people like you and me who exist far beyond the hyperbole, and yet they are often misunderstood. Since September 11, 2001, about 1% of the US population has served in the military. Because so few have served, there can be a civilian-military divide, punctuated by common misunderstandings. The Armed Services Arts Partnership or ASAP helps veterans and their families to thrive through arts classes and performances. Their flagship program is a comedy boot camp where veterans learn about comedy, write their own jokes and then perform in front of a live audience. ASAP’s training helps veterans to develop life skills while breaking down the civilian-military divide. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Sam Pressler “Only 10% of veterans are female, but 35% of our classes are made up of women.” “There is a difference between art therapy and art as therapy.” “Humor was the avenue that I used to get through difficult times.” “When we don’t have a way to connect to one another, we often turn to humor.” “I didn’t know what social entrepreneurship was.” “I’ve really never had any job, except for this.” “The line between emotional tragedy and emotional jubilation is very thin.” “Really ensure that you are taking care of yourself.” “Get to know veterans beyond the stereotype of the hero or the broken.” “This is a movement to ensure veterans have opportunities to express themselves, have a voice and heal through the arts.” Veteran’s Day Resources: Armed Services Arts Partnership (ASAP): http://www.asapasap.org/ Comedy Bootcamp: http://www.comedybootcamp.org ASAP on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ASAP_Vets ASAP on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArmedServicesArtsPartnership ASAP on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/armedservicesartspartnership

123, Allison Archambault, EarthSpark International | Solving Energy Poverty through Innovation
Nov 09 2016 27 mins  
EarthSpark International is working to eradicate energy poverty. Energy poverty is the cycle of poverty that exist when people don’t have access to modern fuels, especially electricity. More than a billion people worldwide do not have access to electricity. And even more people do not have access to reliable electricity. For many of these people, they spend a very large portion of their income on energy services such as kerosene, candles, batteries and cell phone charging services. EarthSpark International researches and develops business models that can spin-off and scale to address specific aspects of energy poverty. EarthSpark provides a pre-pay microgrid in Les Anglais, Haiti. They serve over 2000 people with 24-hour electricity powered by solar energy. This solar-powered microgrid provides affordable clean energy. It cuts their customers’ energy costs by up to 80%. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Allison Archambault “We’re working on business models that can be relevant to energy poverty in many different places.” “Haiti’s the least electrified country in the western hemisphere.” “I signed up for six months and that was six months ago.” “It’s easier to build a town-sized, solar powered smart grid in rural Haiti than it is in Washington, DC, where I live.” “A lot of people in Haiti have cell phones but they don’t have access to electricity.” “Everybody aspires to higher levels of electricity.” “We call it de-risking by doing.” “A microgrid is an energy system that is at a community scale.” “We’re powerful enough to energize industry, and progressive enough to deliver electricity to every single customer within the infrastructure’s footprint.” “We have a solar powered microgrid that is delivering clean, affordable and reliable electricity to about two thousand people in a town in rural Haiti.” “Our mission is to eradicate energy poverty, but the method is to do research and development on business models that we can spin off and scale.” “It’s not one single solution that’s going to solve energy poverty. It’s a real portfolio approach.” “We have a goal of building eighty grids in the next five years.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: EarthSpark: http://www.earthsparkinternational.org



121, Lauren Fine, Youth Sentencing and Reentry Project (YSRP) | Providing the Child Advocacy every Child Deserves
Nov 04 2016 27 mins  
The Youth Sentencing & Reentry Project is dedicated to keeping kids out of adult jails and prisons. Did you make any bad decisions when you were ten years old? I know I did. In many states, including Pennsylvania, children as young as ten years old can be treated by the courts as an adult. When children come into the court system, they can be offered a public defender. However, when children are in trouble in a group, and we know that children often get into trouble in a group setting, only one of the children will be given a public defender. The others are appointed a private attorney. These private attorneys can be private practitioners who lack a support team such as paralegals, social workers or case managers. The Youth Sentencing & Reentry Project supports kids who are prosecuted in the adult criminal justice system, including individuals who were sentenced to life without parole as children. They do that by helping lawyers with low-income clients get their cases transferred from the adult criminal justice system to the juvenile justice system. They also help connect youth and juvenile lifers with existing community resources and programs, so they have access to education, healthcare, stable housing and job placement. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lauren Fine “Children as young as 10 years old can be treated as adults in the criminal justice system.” “On any given night in the United States there are 10,000 children in adult jails or prisons.” “In Pennsylvania we have the highest number of individuals who, as children, were sentenced to live without the possibility of parole.” “It’s important to note that race is really relevant in terms of which kids are being treated as if there were adults.” “86% of youth tried as adults are youth of color.” “Youth of color are ten times as likely to be sentenced to life without parole.” “Pick good advisors.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Youth Sentencing & Reentry Project (YSRP): https://ysrp.org/ YSRP on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ysrpinphilly YSRP on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhillyYSRP

120, Paul Bradley, ROC USA | Housing Security for Mobile Home Owners
Nov 02 2016 30 mins  
ROC USA is a non-profit organization with a mission of making quality resident ownership possible nationwide. When Paul Bradley was studying economics in university, he became interest in cooperative business models. “It immediately appealed to me,” he told me. “By its structure, it’s a more broadly distributing form of business ownership. Resources are shared more broadly among workers, among members and among consumers of the cooperatives.” Paul was also interested in development work, spending time in Central America. When he returned to his home in Concord, New Hampshire, he found the opportunity to work in development work in his own neighborhood. He worked with the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund where he organized mobile home park residents. In the United States, there are around 50,000 mobile home parks. The residents, many of whom are low-income, often own the home in which they live, but they do not own the land on which the home sits. It can be quite expensive to move a mobile home to another lot. Because mobile home owners do not own the lot, they do not have control over the lot rent. Rent can go up significantly with as little as sixty days’ notice. Some mobile home park owners do not properly maintain the infrastructure such as roads and sewage. This can cause homeowners to be held captive in unsafe and deteriorating conditions. Mobile home owners also lack the security of land tenure. A mobile home community can be closed with very little notice. This often happens when the value of the land has gone up significantly, and the land owner chooses to turn the land to another use. Homeowners who may have been paying rent for decades can suddenly lose their home. ROC USA helps homeowners form a cooperative, and to purchase land in order to preserve and improve the community. Each homeowner owns one share in the cooperative that owns the land. There are two barriers that keep mobile home owners from forming cooperatives and purchasing their land. One is technical know-how. The other is access to capital. ROC USA addresses both of these challenges. ROC USA has scaled a model of resident ownership in manufactured home communities, building a network of more than 10,000 secure and affordable homes with partners in 14 states. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: ROC USA: http://rocusa.org ROC USA on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rocusa.bettertogether ROC USA on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ROCUSAorg Cooperatives for a Better World: http://cooperativesforabetterworld.coop


118, Avnish Gungadurdoss, Instiglio | Tying social program funding to results
Oct 28 2016 31 mins  
Instiglio is a nonprofit with a mission of maximizing the social impact of every cent spent on social programs. They do that by tying funding to results. Avnish Gungadurdoss grew up on the island nation of Mauritius. He was drawn to do social work at a young age. “I remember being taken by how much the poor’s trajectory was completely dependent on where they were born,” he told me. “To me that was a crazy thought, that life is up to the random chance of where you were born.” While working in the field and seeing firsthand the gap between the promise of social programs and their outcome, he recognized that most social programs are funded for inputs and activities, not impact. “Policies that look good on paper get implemented in such a poor manner that they rarely deliver results on the ground,” he acknowledged. He and his cofounders decided to do something about that. They founded Instiglio in 2012. Instiglio helps social programs to be more effective in solving the world’s most pressing issues. They do that by tying funding to results. Instiglio is a leader in Results-Based Financing. That is, funding of social programs is tied directly to their impact. Instiglio focuses on two tools: Performance-Based Contracts and Impact Bonds. They also provide Performance Management services to help service providers track and make data-driven decisions to improve the impact of their programs. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Avnish Gungadurdoss “That’s the real standard we need to hold ourselves to in international development. Can we be better than just giving people a handout?” “Can we actually solve these market failures in such a way that’s relevant, and that drives results and outcomes for the populations that we’re serving?” “How do we actually make good policies work on the ground?” “We have been able to mobilize about $320 million towards results-based financing instruments.” “The deeper you look, the more troubling it was.” “There was this broad recognition that every year billions of dollars are spent with absolutely no impact.” “We wanted to shift the game.” “It’s a fairly simple concept, but it’s tricky to do in practice.” “These types of instruments are provoking some radical transformations.” “You see the organizations transition from a beneficiary mindset to a client mindset.” “Do it about something you care about, that grips you emotionally.” “Your purpose has to be strong enough to keep you going.” “Do it with a team that is equally committed and whom you can trust.” “Social programs, when they work well, are smart economics and smart politics.” “The idea of unlocking the potential of people who are otherwise constrained by poverty, should be of interest to every nation.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Instiglio: http://www.instiglio.org

117, Safeena Husain, Educate Girls | The Power of an Educated Girl
Oct 26 2016 23 mins  
Safeena Husain of Educate Girls works with volunteers across Indian villages to find out-of-school girls, bring them back to school and to educate them. As an educated, successful woman, Safeena Husain visited a village, accompanied by her father. Because they were strangers in the village, the local residents were naturally curious. The local villagers asked Safeena’s father about his family. When her father explained that this was his only child, a daughter, the reaction shocked Safeena. “You poor thing,” they said. “Perhaps it is not too late for you. You can still try to have a son.” Safeena thought to herself, “If I am treated like this, what chance does the poor girl in the village have?” When a girl is educated, they have the potential to enter the formal economy, gain employment and lift their families out of poverty. Educate Girls works at the root cause of gender inequality in India's education system. They work with thousands of schools, reaching millions of children in some of India's most remote areas. Through their work, they have achieved over 90% enrollment and higher attendance for girls. They have also worked to improve school infrastructure, quality of education and learning outcomes for all girls. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Safeena Husain “We find every girl who is out of school. We make sure she is brought back to school, stays in school and is learning.” “To find the girls out of school, we go door-to-door.” “It’s not enough to have her in school. If she’s not learning, everything would be worthless.” “India has the highest number of out-of-school girls in the world.” “We have the highest number of child brides anywhere on the planet.” “And we also have the highest number of women or girls that are trafficked.” “The World Bank says that investing in a girl’s education is the best investment a country can make.” “For each additional year of schooling for a girl, family income goes up by 10% - 15%.” “Once she is educated, she is 500 times more likely to educate her children.” “These are not the rules. These are just the rules we have made.” “I thought I have to do something in girls’ education, because I found my pathway through education.” “They gave me a list of 26 critical gender gap districts.” “I learned from a lot of best practices in this sector.” “In terms of learning, we had an almost 30% better result than a regular government school, in our school.” “My job is to have a vision of success.” “It’s a mindset issue.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Educate Girls: http://educategirls.ngo Educate Girls on Twitter: https://twitter.com/educate_girls Safeena Husain on Twitter: https://twitter.com/safeenahusain Educate Girls on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/educategirls


116, Tom Streitz, Twin Cities RISE | Ending Poverty through Personal Empowerment
Oct 24 2016 32 mins  
Twin Cities RISE transforms lives through personal empowerment and meaningful work. In the United States, one of the richest countries in the world, why does poverty persist across generations? The path out of poverty is complex, but it almost always involves meaningful work. And, while it often takes technical skills to find a job, more often the barrier to work involves power skills – emotional intelligence, social intelligence, confidence, belief, a sense of self-worth. Through their Personal Empowerment program, Twin Cities RISE creates transformative change, self-confidence and self-reliance. Twin Cities RISE helps individuals in poverty to find long-term, meaningful and stable employment. When someone joins Twin Cities RISE, they are assigned a coach. They participate in the Personal Empowerment program and they are connected with employment opportunities. Twin Cities RISE provides work skills training, internship opportunities, job search assistance, and employment placement. Twin Cities RISE creates long-term results. Eighty-two percent of graduates are still at their job after one year and seventy-five percent after two years. That’s more than double the national job retention average. Through their Reentry Connect program, they have reduced first-year recidivism rates from 43% to 13%. Studies have shown that, for every dollar invested in Twin Cities RISE, they produce seven dollars of social benefit. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Tom Streitz “The mission is focused around breaking multigenerational poverty.” “The technical skills someone needs on a job, we believe come after a grounding in emotional intelligence.” “The real foundation of what we’ve done is focusing on outcomes.” “We were a pioneer in Minnesota for Pay for Performance.” “The average income of someone coming into our program last year was around $3,000 to $4,000.” “This is a place where people walk through the door and their future hangs in the balance.” “For those who complete the program, it’s nothing short of a miracle.” “Are you prepared to take this journey? If you are, the outcomes are phenomenal.” “We don’t call people ‘clients.’ They’re participants.” “They’re the ones driving their success. We are a witness to it.” “Our retention rate on the job after one year is 82%, which is double the national average.” “Business principles can drive very successful social outcomes.” “By measuring it, we can demonstrate the economic proposition.” “Every dollar the state of Minnesota has invested in Twin Cities RISE, has delivered seven dollars back to the taxpayers.” “It pays for itself and has dividends both economically and socially.” “It is literally going to the root.” “It’s an intervention that’s meant to completely empower and transform someone on their journey.” “Their intelligence and their grit is intact. What’s lacking is a belief that are either worthy of or can achieve anything of importance.” “We are involved in addressing systemic issues that weave a web that keeps people enmeshed in systemic poverty.” “Our vision is long-term, meaningful employment that supports you and your family.” “Under our reentry connect program, the recidivism rate is under 12%.” “We’re a school that’s free for people in poverty.” “The best path out of poverty is a great job.” “Employers love to hire our participants.” “Look at the system that keeps that problem in place, and devise a very simple intervention.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Twin Cities RISE: http://www.twincitiesrise.org Book: The Non Nonprofit: For-Profit Thinking for Nonprofit Success: http://amzn.to/2exJWDF Twin Cities RISE on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/twincitiesrise Twin Cities RISE on Twitter: https://twitter.com/twincitiesrise Reentry Connect crowdfunding campaign: http://www.twincitiesrise.org/releaseandrestore

115, Anushka Ratnayake, myAgro | How to Move Smallholder Farmers out of Poverty
Oct 21 2016 24 mins  
Anushka Ratnayake of myAgro uses a combination of savings, inputs and training to increase the income of smallholder farmers. As a social entrepreneur, Anushka Ratnayake has seen startup challenges that are not common in other regions. For example, less than a year after launching myAgro, an armed conflict broke out in northern Mali. A group associated with Al-Qaeda set up a new state in Norther Mali. In response, the French military launched an operation and ousted the rebels. Anushka Ratnayake, the founder of myAgro was an early employee with Kiva. There she learned about the power of microfinance to impact poverty. She also worked with One Acre Fund where her job was to develop a repayment process for smallholder farmers. She heard from the farmers that they wanted to prepay their loan, or in other words, they were asking for help in saving money for the future. Seventy percent of the population of Mali are smallholder farmers, most living on less than two dollars per day. The farmers have seasonal income. They have the most cash at harvest time and less cash on hand when it is time to purchase seeds and fertilizer. myAgro sells seeds and fertilizer on layaway via a mobile phone platform. They also provide training on well-established agricultural methods. This helps smallholder farmers grow more food and increase their income. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Anushka Ratnayake “Smallholder farmers make up 80% of the two billion people living under two-dollars per day.” “I saw this opportunity of low yields, lots of land and a fast growing population.” “I started hacking One Acre Fund from within.” “When you’re working a startup, everyone’s time and resources are so valuable.” “On the side, I started working with someone on a savings program for a cow.” “There were all doing amazing work, but no one had a savings program specifically for farmers.” “Solving the financing problem for farmers is a key to ending poverty in our lifetime.” “One of the reasons it’s hard to serve smallholder farmers is that they tend to need many different support mechanisms.” “It’s really convenient for farmers to put small amounts of money aside.” “We bulk purchase seeds and fertilizer and deliver it to farmers.” “It’s that combination of financing plus delivery of inputs plus training that really gets us that increase in harvest and the increase in income that we’re seeing.” “Farmers are increasing their harvest from 50% - 100% over a control field.” “They’re increasing their income by an average of $150.” “There was a twelve hour period when it was unclear whether Mali would continue to exist.” “I think social enterprises sometimes under value the impact they have on their team.” “Our favorite day across the organization is delivery day, when farmers get their inputs.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: myAgro: http://www.myagro.org/

114, Satyan Mishra, Drishtee | Developing Sustainable Communities
Oct 19 2016 29 mins  
Satyan Mishra of Drishtee is developing sustainable communities in the villages of India. In the late 1990s, while Satyan Mishra was working on a government contract, he had the opportunity to visit many villages across India. In India, more than 775 million people live in small villages. Nearly half of them live on less than one dollar per day. Satyan saw how the presence of a computer in a village could have an impact. His company, Drishtee started setting up kiosks in villages. By 2006 they had set up over 1,000 village kiosks. And yet, as Satyan told me, “I realized that what we had done had not really made any impact on the community.” Economic challenges, social constraints and environmental degradation remained. So, Satyan and his cofounders at Drishtee decided to take the company in a different direction. While they continue to work at the village level, today they use the power of entrepreneurship to take on the social challenges of the villages. They take a holistic approach to community development. They start with livelihood. This often comes by developing local agriculture. Once people have livelihood, then Drishtee works to add services – doctors, education, banking, cobblers, etc., which further stimulates the economy. This is followed by infrastructure such as roads and electricity. The fourth area of intervention is governance. Drishtee incubates businesses in a non-profit. If the ideas is successful and looks like it will be able to scale, they move the idea into the for-profit side of the business. They are in about six thousand villages today. That means that their work impacts around two million families. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Satyan Mishra “We have always worked in villages.” “We have always believed in entrepreneurship.” “We have always been drive by business models.” “There are business solutions for every problem that exists.” “When I was in class nine, I wanted to be filthy rich.” “We realized the computers could not solve all of the problems of the community.” “The idea of Drishtee was to make money initially, but over a period of time I realized that this is perhaps not the best way to become the richest person in the world.” “Our entire approach was very top-down.” “That is when we started looking at the community as a customer.” “Sixty-five percent of people live in the villages, but they contribute about fifteen percent of the overall GDP.” “When you go into a village, you see that most people do not have jobs.” “The first and foremost need that they had was livelihood.” “There were four areas that were needed. The first was livelihood.” “Agriculture stood out as an area that we could train and enhance.” “We are like a pipeline. Start with an idea. Incubate it. Nurture it.” “We have limited bandwidth, but the need of the community is unlimited.” “I think a social entrepreneur is one who will be relentless, and would be flexible.” “We have been treating the symptoms. It’s time to look at the core disease.” “We have moved away from living together.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Drishtee: http://drishtee.com MadhuKrishi: https://www.facebook.com/MadhuKrishi Drishtee Rural Apparel Production (DRAP): http://www.drishtee.org/?page_id=63 Gharunda: http://www.drishtee.org/?page_id=73

113, Yvette Ondachi, Ojay Greene | Connecting Smallholder Farmers to Markets
Oct 16 2016 32 mins  
Yvette Ondachi uses technology to connect smallholder farmers to markets. Yvette Ondachi is a biochemist. She was a pharmaceutical product manager across several east African countries. “The problem I encountered was, most people couldn’t afford [medicine],” Yvette told me. Even after an experiment in which the company lowered the cost of medications by 75%, many people still could not get access to medicine. “One of the things that propelled me,” Yvette explained, “was watching mothers, helpless as their children suffered from preventable diseases.” She knew she had to do something to make a difference. “Something within me became very restless. I said, ‘I have to do something about this.’” Most of the people who were unable to buy medicine were smallholder farmers, those who farm on small plots of land and live off of their crops. Globally, there are about 500 million smallholder farmers. They produce 80% of the food consumed in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. In Kenya, around 42 million people work at least part time in agriculture. Yvette’s company, Ojay Greene works with smallholder farmers to remove the barriers that limit them. Ojay Greene uses technology to give smallholder farmers access to markets, therefore increasing their earnings. Farmers who participate increase their income by five times over five years. Quotes from Yvette Ondachi about Smallholder Farmers “What we do with smallholder farmers is, we link them to profitable markets.” “Smallholder farmers constitute between 50% and 70% of populations across Africa.” “Poverty robs them of their potential.” “I asked the question, why is it that people who are involved in food production are poor?” “Despite advances in mobile phones and other advances, very little had occurred in agriculture.” “I looked at the skill I had in my hand, and the skill I had in my hand was marketing.” “There was a lack of coordination between the supply and the demand.” “It is uncomfortable to watch people wallow in poverty.” “I was looking at the science of farming.” “This text system came out as a result of a problem and a frustration.” “In Sub-Saharan Africa, the continent is spending close to $40 billion importing food.” “We’re taking them on a journey where they move from subsistence farming to building micro enterprises.” “The end game of what we’re trying to achieve is to build strong and vibrant communities.” “We’re looking at going into four countries by 2018.” “When you have a goal, it’s important to stick to it.” “For every ten doors I knock, chances are that nine are shut.” “Many people want the success of your journey and not the hardship of your journey.” “I looked into the business aspect of the social enterprise and said this has to make business sense.” “We have focused on churning up the revenue.” “Never forget why you did this in the first place.” “Don’t do this for the money. Do this for the positive change.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Ojay Greene: http://www.ojaygreene.com Ojay Greene on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OjayGreene

112, Martin von Hildebrand, Gaia Amazonas | Promoting the Rights of Indigenous People and the Environment
Oct 14 2016 27 mins  
Martin von Hildebrand has been working with indigenous people for the last 42 years to protect their rights and the environment. Martin lived with indigenous people in the Amazon rainforest from the 1972 through 1980. There, he witnessed rubber tappers exploiting the lands and missionaries converting the indigenous people from their traditional ways. By listening to the indigenous people, he was able to learn what they wanted, and to explore ways to secure their future. Martin realized that, the indigenous people needed to secure land rights, the right to self-governance, and environmental protections. Martin worked with the government to secure all of these rights. In Colombia, 26 million hectares were set aside. Indigenous people have their own governmental system, and they are managing their environmental programs. Martin’s work is spreading beyond Colombia to the rest of the Amazon. The Amazon is critical for so many reason. The Amazon is a rich source of biodiversity. Twenty percent of the world’s oxygen comes from the Amazon. And the Amazon rainforest is responsible for moving moisture from the sea inwards, through what has been described as “flying rivers.” Today, the rainforest remains under pressure from hydropower, oil, mining, roads, timber production and agriculture. Martin takes a collaborative and pragmatic approach to saving the rainforest. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Gaia Amazonas: http://gaiaamazonas.org Gaia Amazonas on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gaiaamazonas Gaia Amazonas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/gaiaamazonas


111, Anne Field, Award-Winning Writer, Editor, Journalist | Not Only For Profit
Oct 12 2016 23 mins  
Anne Field is interested in “not only for profit” businesses. Anne Field is an award-winning writer, editor and journalist. Just over ten years ago, she wrote an article on for-profit social enterprises and impact investing. At the time, the term impact investing was new. The B-Lab had just been formed, and new social enterprises were blooming. Anne became fascinated how companies could make a profit with a purpose. Today, Anne is best known for her Forbes blog Not Only for Profit. She writes about for-profit social enterprises and impact investing. She primarily focuses on the startup journey. She is one of the people I closely follow on social media. In this conversation, Anne describes where her interest in social entrepreneurship and impact investing began. She describes some of the forces behind the growth of social entrepreneurship including the financial meltdown, the frustration with inaction on some of the larger issues of our time, and the important role of millennials. She describes four trends in social entrepreneurship that she is noticing, including companies that utilize tech breakthroughs, accelerators, companies that repurpose waste and local equity investments. She describes her worries about social entrepreneurship, but also her hopes. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Anne Field “I started hearing more and more about this new thing [social entrepreneurship]. This was more than ten years ago.” “The field has grown more and really blossomed.” “Something that gave it a big push is the financial meltdown and the sort of world economic crisis.” “What happens in the political sphere has been extremely depressing and seems to be going nowhere. Most importantly in the US is the area of climate change.” “The trend of millennial interest is extremely important. It’s really what’s giving this at all a shot and arm.” “I just don’t know if all this stuff is going to last if it had legs or if it’s what amounts to a fad.” “There’s another issue also with just how much these enterprises can scale.” “For them to be really effective, these companies really have to scale.” “I do see it becoming more entrenched, for example in business schools.” “My hope is that it becomes increasingly mainstream.” “You have to focus on the money.” “I think that the for-profit part is very important in helping a company scale and become sustainable.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Anne Field: http://annefieldonline.com Anne Field’s blog on Forbes, Not Only for Profit: http://www.forbes.com/sites/annefield/ Anne Field on Twitter: https://twitter.com/annefieldonline Soular Backpack: https://the-soular-backpack.myshopify.com

110, J.B. Schramm, New Profit | Advance Equity through Investment
Oct 10 2016 26 mins  
New Profit supports systems-changing ideas to advance equity. America has a problem. We need ten million more people with degrees and quality credentials by the year 2025. J.B. Schramm wants to do something about that, in a way that advances equity. J.B. was a co-founder, and now serves on the board of College Summit. College Summit partners with high schools in low-income communities to empower students. They see students as peer-leaders. To date, they have served over 250,000 students from 500 schools nationwide. College summit saw quite a bit of success. President Obama awarded College Summit a portion of his noble prize fund. They were selected by the World Economic Forum as the US Social Entrepreneur of the Year. J.B. enjoyed the program work, but eventually, like very great social entrepreneur, he began thinking about how to shift the system. He began doing field work in order to advance equity across the entire system. Today, J.B. leads New Profit’s Learn to Earn Fund. Learn to Earn scales proven initiatives for low-income students to help them succeed in college and career. New Profit is a venture philanthropy fund. Their mission is to break down the barriers that stand between people and opportunity in America. They partner social entrepreneurs and philanthropists to transform the way America educates its children. One of New Profit’s initiatives is a Power Skills XPRIZE. Power skills include leadership, critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, communication, growth mindset and grit. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from J.B. Schramm “For national security, global competitiveness and social justice reasons, our nation needs to develop ten million more Americans with degrees and quality credentials by 2025.” “Unfortunately, what we haven’t seen are initiatives that are moving the needle for low-income students and scaling.” “What Learn to Earn seeks to do is to scale proven initiatives for low-income students for their post-secondary and career success.” “We use a private equity model for helping initiatives scale.” “We help convene and catalyze the ecosystem.” “We bring together our high net worth network, along with institutional funders to build funds that not only help to stretch the dollars and leverage the funders dollars but they also help these leading funders mitigate some risk.” “We work to build a community of funders that assess the issue and then jump in together.” “That was when I first recognized that talent is evenly distributed but opportunity is not.” “While it’s important for each of these groups to serve more and more students, it’s also important to think about the field.” “I’m just a firm believer that we learn by trying it out.” “You’re going to have to be a pit bull.” “Pay attention to your unit economics early.” “Paying attention early on for the unit economics is going to make a difference between having a great idea that maybe inspires people versus an inspiring idea that actually can scale.” “Start thinking about student activation.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: New Profit: http://www.newprofit.org Power Skills X-Prize: http://www.xprize.org/prizes/future-prizes/power-skills College Summit: http://www.collegesummit.org Announcement: Back to Three Times Per Week, for Now In June, we throttled back the number of episodes from three per week to one per week. While this change was somewhat popular, we also heard from plenty of others who wanted to hear from more social entrepreneurs. So, starting this week, we’re going to go back to the three times weekly schedule. You’ll have a chance to meet more social entrepreneurs and we’ll have a chance to highlight more important work. We’ll continue to monitor feedback and see how this change goes. If you have an opinion, let us know in the comments below.


108, Chris Underhill, BasicNeeds | Partnering with people living with mental illness
Sep 26 2016 35 mins  
BasicNeeds works in partnership with people living with mental illness. Picture it. A young Chris Underhill and his wife are making their way out of a large hospital in Malawi where they have just been given wonderful news. They are expecting their first child. The year is 1969. The courtyard is filled with family members of hospital patients. Smoke from cooking fills the air. The hallways are crowded as the young is compelled forward, carried by their good news. As they round a corner, they come upon an unexpected scene. They find themselves confronted with a cage containing five men. The cage is surrounded by small children poking the men with sticks and taunting them. As Chris would later discover, this scene is far from uncommon for mental health patients in low-resource settings. This bittersweet moment compelled Chris Underhill into a life of service on behalf of mentally ill patients in low-resource settings. Globally, nearly six hundred million people suffer from mental illness. In low-income countries most are forced to suffer without help. BasicNeeds is working to improve the lives of people living with mental illness and epilepsy. They have developed a model of intervention that is effective, locally owned, can be replicated and is transferable. Since the year 2000, their programs have improved the lives of over 665,000 people living with mental illness and/or epilepsy, their caregivers and families. Mental Health Quotes from Chris Underhill “At any one time, in the world there are at least 450 million people who are suffering from mental illness and who should be getting treatment.” “The treatments are available, and often they are not particularly expensive.” “It’s very common to see a mental health [treatment] gap of 85%.” “It is not uncommon for teams in the BasicNeeds family of organizations to find themselves in the presence of a person who has been illegally imprisoned.” “I was in the organization Practical Action, minding my own business, and getting on with being a chief executive of someone else’s organization…and someone knocked on the door…and he said ‘Have you got another organization in you?’” “This event came surging forward and became the thing that I wanted to do.” “We had a reasonable battery of skills which come under the title of capacity building, consultation, workshopping, and so on.” “If the first point was consultation, then the next point in the whole construction of this idea, was definitely partnership.” “You’ve got that capacity building bit, you’ve got that leadership bit, and you’ve got that local partnership bit. And those three things seem to be inherently sensible and probably were the products of a certain amount of experience.” “It always takes longer than you think.” “Don’t under-budget.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: BasicNeeds: http://www.basicneeds.org BasicNeeds on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BasicNeedsIntl Chris Underhill on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChrisBasicNeeds Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BasicNeedsIntl Thrive: http://thrive.org.uk Practical Action: http://practicalaction.org Mental Health Innovation Network: http://mhinnovation.net Voluntary Service Overseas: https://www.vsointernational.org Southwest Solutions: http://www.swsol.org





104, Adam Force, Change Creator | A Multimedia Platform for Business with a Purpose
Aug 30 2016 34 mins  
This is what happens when podcasters interview podcasters. As two podcasters, Adam Force and I have a great time going back and forth in this engaging interview. Adam tells the story of how he started Change Creator and what it is that he is hoping to do. Adam was sitting on a beach in Costa Rica when the direction of his life shifted. At the time he and his wife were living in New York. They had taken a trip to Costa Rica in order to recharge. While sitting quietly and connecting to nature, Adam suddenly realized that his life should mean more – needed to mean more. With more than 15 years of creative work, he tried several avenues. He started a blog. He launched a water bottle made out of hemp. He became a rainforest advocate. None of these ideas seemed just right. It was during this time that he came across the book Making Good. This book outlines how to find opportunities to effect change and make money. Adam took an inventory of his skills and decided to utilize his expertise in brand building to launch Change Creator. Change Creator is a multimedia platform focused on business with purpose. They offer a digital magazine app (available on iOS & Android) for ambitious entrepreneurs eager to change the world, and a podcast with social entrepreneurs. Social Entrepreneurship Resources Mentioned on This Episode: Change Creator: http://changecreatormag.com/ Book: Making Good: Finding Meaning, Money, and Community in a Changing World: http://amzn.to/2c9jFZY Interview with Nathan Chan, Foundr Magazine: http://tonyloyd.com/002 UpWork: https://www.upwork.com/ Pro Blogger: http://www.problogger.net

103, Krista Carrol, Latitude | A Company Powered by Purpose
Aug 29 2016 33 mins  
Latitude is a for-profit creative agency, powered by purpose. In November, 2009, Krista and her husband were in their 30s and, as she told me, “chasing the American dream really hard.” They were being financially successful, but lacked a level of meaning and purpose. It was during a trip to Haiti that they witnessed extreme poverty for the first time. In response to this life-changing experience, they decided to form a social enterprise. In order to avoid debt, Krista, her husband and two small children moved into her parents’ basement. Their company, Latitude is a for-profit, full service creative agency. They do amazingly great work in brand design and experience design. What makes Latitude unique is that they donate 50% of their profits to help women and children in the developing world. They work primarily with three nonprofit partners in 18 countries. They have been able to direct $2.7 million to trusted nonprofits. Through International Justice Mission, they have rescued over 2,600 people from sex trafficking and slavery. They have partnered with Healing Haiti to build a medical and dental clinic. They have built homes and an orphanage. Through their work, over 13 million gallons of clean water has been delivered. They have partnered with Opportunity International to fund several thousand microloans for women entrepreneurs. They also partnered with Opportunity International on an entrepreneurial High School in Nicaragua. Several hundred students have attended. They have provided food through Feed My Starving Children. They partnered with Matter on equipping clinics in Honduras and Mongolia. They have provided desks and supplies to schools for girls in Afghanistan. Quotes from Krista Carroll on Being Powered by Purpose “You need to know how to set people up for success.” “We looked at these children who were so similar to our own children. The only difference was that they were born in a different latitude and longitude in which opportunity was scarce.” “We have to win our business on being excellent providers.” “We have had virtually zero turnover with our clients.” “There’s no room for anything less than excellence and sustainability.” “The partnership between a for-profit and a nonprofit challenges each of us to think holistically.” “It’s a constant process of poking holes in your own plans.” “As a CEO, I’ve come to terms with being misunderstood at times.” “One unexpected benefit of being a company that is powered by purpose has been the incredible talent that we have attracted.” “Limit your debt and limit the complexity.” “Use the gifts you’ve been given to empower those who have not been given as much.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Latitude: http://latitudeelevates.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/latitudeforgood Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/workwithlatitude



101, Kat Taylor, Beneficial State Bank | Beneficial to All, Harmful to None
Aug 15 2016 33 mins  
Can a bank be beneficial to all and harmful to none? Does your bank do only good and no harm? Do you know? Beneficial State Bank aims to bank in a way that is beneficial to all and harmful to none. It’s more than a platitude. They proactively measure themselves against goals such as how many affordable housing units they have financed, how many kilowatt hours of clean energy their loans have produced and how many millions of dollars they have loaned non-profits. Kat Taylor and her husband set out to create a business that would do social good with a sustainable business model. So far, they seem to be doing quite well. Beneficial Quotes from Kat Taylor “The way we think about social justice…is that we run our economy and our society in a way that distributes power, creates broad prosperity and gives individuals a hefty dose of self-determination. “ “I think that the banking sector is rife with opportunity for change by individuals.” “We’ve been trained over decades as depositors to believe all we deserve is a pittance of an interest rate return, particularly where federal interest rates are right now, and no voice. But we should actually have the maximum voice among stakeholders of the banks because we control, at a minimum, nine out of ten dollars lent.” “We should really be listening to those depositors, and we should be awakening them to the voice that they can have.” “You can go to Treasury’s CDFI web site and there’s a map there of where those 111 banks are. So the first thing anyone can do is simply take their money out of a bank that’s not respecting their values and put it in a bank that is.” “We’ve been trying to be on the leading edge of the movement to establish third-party auditable, credible, robust impact metrics for the banking sector.” Beneficial Resources: Beneficial State Bank: http://beneficialstatebank.com/ Beneficial State Impact Statement: http://beneficialstate.org/impact/ Episode 025, David Reiling, Sunrise Banks: http://tonyloyd.com/025/ Episode 026, Joseph Sanberg, Aspiration: http://tonyloyd.com/026/






096, Lee Wallace, Peace Coffee | Fair Trade Coffee from Smallholder Farmers
Jul 11 2016 41 mins  
Smallholder farmers grow more than half of the coffee consumed worldwide. Imagine if you will, that you are working at a non-profit in Minnesota, focusing on public policy. The phone rings, and the person on the other end says “Hello. This is the Port of Los Angeles. We have 38,000 pounds of green coffee with your name on it. How would you like to pick this up?” You know nothing about coffee or roasting or retail. What would you do? That is exactly what happened twenty years ago at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. In today’s Social Entrepreneur, Lee Wallace, the Queen Bean of Peace Coffee tells us the rest of the story. Peace Coffee is a for-profit social enterprise, owned by a nonprofit, the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. Peace Coffee has a wholesale business that they have been running for about two decades. They also have four retail coffee shops within the Twin Cities, Minnesota. Last year Peace Coffee purchased 735,000 lbs. of coffee from 12 countries and 20 smallholder farmer cooperatives. In the process, Peace Coffee paid $370,000 in fair trade premiums. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Lee Wallace “We think hard about how to do the right thing for coffee farmers.” “Our customers named us.” “I was trying to find a career that made sense to me in terms of my passions.” “What I was trying to do was find places that sit at the nexus of mission and money.” “Pretty quickly I realized that this is a magical place for me.” “I have always been interested in how organizations work.” “We spend a lot of our time at work.” “The Twin Cities is an amazing place to learn about natural foods because we have such a vibrant and thriving co-op ecosystem.” “My dad really wanted us to understand the history of industry as it came in and out of communities and how that really impacted families in those communities.” “The original idea was that we would be an importer of all kinds of things.” “More than 50% of the world’s coffee farmers, farm coffee on very small parcels of land.” “We come this work with the sense that, what we’re doing is working on trying to elevate the livelihood of an awful lot of people who historically have been very disadvantaged when it comes to the way trade works.” “It’s livelihood, but its community development too.” “Co-ops are stepping in and playing the role of civil society in these communities.” “People in these communities have ideas and know how they’re going to make their communities better. Our job is to be a good partner on the other side of that.” “We have a price floor…We believe that below this level is unsustainable for coffee farmers.” “This company existing 10 years from now is more important than what is happening this month. This company is bigger than all of us.” “You’d be amazed at who would be willing to talk to you.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Peace Coffee: https://www.peacecoffee.com/ Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy: http://www.iatp.org/ Upcoming Webinar: How to Make a Difference while Making a Living (HINT: No Ramen Noodles Required) On July 20, 2016 at Noon US Central time, I am hosting the webinar, “How to Make a Difference while Making a Living (HINT: No Ramen Noodles Required).” In this webinar I will be talking about: How to go from being a compassion person to being a changemaker How to overcome the five most common roadblocks to being a changemaker The seven key characteristics of successful changemakers The ten steps on the path to changemaking During the webinar, we will be giving away fabulous gifts and prizes. You won’t want to miss this. Register for the webinar today: http://tonyloyd.com/difference .



093, Taylor Downs, OpenFn | Increase Impact by Automating #TechForGood
Jun 20 2016 45 mins  
In today’s episode of Social Entrepreneur, we continue our #TechForGood series. Today we meet Taylor Downs of OpenFn (pronounced open function). OpenFn is the easy way for NGOs to connect all of their technologies in a few clicks. Here’s why that is important. We know the promise of technology. When we automate routine data jobs: We increase the speed of our impact, brining data to near real time. We increase data accuracy, reducing data entry errors. We reduce costs of people-intensive routine jobs. And we can more easily utilize our technology, reducing the need for technical specialists on the job. We can quickly scale and amplify our impact, especially when our technologies integrate with one another. Technologies work better when they work together. But of course, systems do not always want to work and play well together. That’s where OpenFn comes in. They support mission-driven organizations to integrate and automate their routine jobs. Resources from our Conversation about Automating #TechForGood: OpenFn: https://www.openfn.org/ Vera Solutions: http://www.verasolutions.org/ Taylor’s PopTech presentation: https://youtu.be/GVB9voGp6T4 Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy Soon we will be launching a Beta version of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.





089, Alexandria Lafci, New Story | Disrupting Community Development through Story-Driven Crowdfunding
May 27 2016 40 mins  
New Story is disrupting community development. They are doing that through a story-driven crowdfunding process for building homes. But, they’re not just building houses, they’re creating communities. And, in the process, they are changing the donor experience. To explain all of this, we’re joined today by Alexandria Lafci, a cofounder and the head of operations for New Story. There’s so much to love about Alexandria and New Story. First, they are targeting communities one at a time. For example, they started in Leveque, Haiti where they moved 152 families from living under blue tarps, to living in lovely homes. And, by building that many homes, they were able to create a community. I also love that Alexandria is the head of operations. If you think about it, after a social enterprise defines a problem, comes up with a solution, and funds the idea, the most important priority is execution. Alexandria plays a unique role in seeing to it that New Story disrupts community development. Alexandria is familiar with the need for housing security. Her mother grew up in the foster home system. As a Teach for America volunteer in a southeast Washington DC neighborhood, Alexandria could observe first-hand the impact that housing instability had on her students. After Teach for America, Alexandria took a role in supply chain logistics for a company in Atlanta. This role taught her many of the skills that she uses today at New Story. Alexandria met her cofounders while at a gathering of social entrepreneurs in October 2014. By November of 2014, they put together a minimally viable product (MVP) version of New Story, and by December they were bringing in thousands of donor dollars. By June of 2015, they were in a batch of startups at Y Combinator. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Alexandria Lafci “Just this one thing, housing stability, having it had such far-reaching implications that many of us take for granted, and then not having it had all of these detrimental side effects.” “All we did was we put the image of one family, we put up their story and we had the ability to take payments.” “We started with wanting to help individual families, but when you build homes at a critical mass, you actually create entire communities.” “We use local material and we use local labor.” “Operations is an umbrella term for all of the components necessary to execute our vision in the physical realm.” “What we are doing is creating sustainable communities, places where people want to live.” “The biggest benefit of Y Combinator for us was, just having audacious goals.” “In setting that huge goal, our entire mindset shifted.” “We called it a 100 homes in 100 days campaign.” “When you’re focused on growth almost exclusively, it really jam-packs a lot of lessons that would have taken us years to learn.” “Sometimes the scariest part is starting.” “Another thing that helped was speaking.” “Find someone who shares that passion and who can do that with you.” “Make sure the problem is not already being solved.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: New Story: https://www.newstorycharity.org Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

088, Mike Gabriel, RSF Social Finance | Financing Social Enterprises
May 25 2016 28 mins  
RSF Social Finance has an innovative approach to financing social enterprises. They bring social entrepreneurs and funders together in regional meetings where loan rates are negotiated. Entrepreneurs help funders understand the impact of higher rates, while funders help entrepreneurs understand the impact of lower returns. In the end, they set the rates. How did Mike Gabriel come to join RSF? From 1997 to 2002, Mike Gabriel was an investment banker in San Francisco. “There was the dot-com boom and bust,” Mike told me. “There was a lot of froth – a lot of greed. That took a toll on me. Like many young people do, I questioned, what is it I’m doing with my life?” He decided to travel the world for a while. First stop? The Philippines. While in the Philippines, Mike joined a micro-finance institution. “That got me on this track,” he said. This led to a 5-year stay with the Grameen Foundation. Today, Mike is with RSF Social Finance, as a manager with in the Social Enterprise lending program, specifically focused on ecological stewardship work. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Mike Gabriel “Our mission is to transform the way the world works with money.” “Like many young people do, I questioned, what is it I’m doing with my life?” “RSF is, at the end of the day, trying to create a much better financial system.” “We want to create financial transactions that are based on long-term relationships, based on transparency and that are direct.” “What we’re working on now at RSF is something we’re calling integrative capital.” “Build a strong network of support.” “Is your money aligned with your values?” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: RSF Social Finance: http://rsfsocialfinance.org Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

087, Matthew Patsky, Trillium Asset Management | Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Investing
May 23 2016 30 mins  
Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG); Socially Responsible Investing (SRI); and Impact Investing: these terms have slightly different meaning, but in the end all lead to the same conclusion. When we invest, we are owners of companies. We have an obligation to take that ownership responsibility seriously in order to influence the environmental and social impact of companies. For today’s episode of Social Entrepreneur, we continue our May #MoneyMonday series with Matthew Patsky of Trillium Asset Management. Trillium has been recognized as a “Best for the World” BCorp. We dig in to the governance aspect of ESG. Trillium not only screens investments into or out of their portfolio based on ESG, they use their shareholder status to improve the environmental, social and governance policies of companies they hold in their portfolio. Trillium Asset Management works with individual investors, financial advisors and institutional investors. For individuals, they combine investment performance with environmental and social impact. For financial advisors, Trillium enables them to meet the needs of their clients looking for sustainable investments. And Trillium partners with institutional investors to align their investment portfolio with their organizational values. Quotes from Matthew Patsky on Environmental, Social and Governance Investing “There are impacts with money and the way money is invested.” “On behalf of the clients, we are acting as owners and trying to influence behavior toward more sustainable business practices.” “We actually do see a positive long-term financial benefit to doing the right thing on governance.” “There seems to be an awful lot from the Ben & Jerry’s culture that is now running throughout all of Uniliver.” “The worst thing you can do is to sit back and say “I am but one individual. What I do doesn’t matter.’” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Trillium Asset Management: http://www.trilliuminvest.com White Papers: http://www.trilliuminvest.com/news-resources/investing-white-papers Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.


086, Christopher Gray, Scholly | Student Loan Debt Slayer
May 20 2016 24 mins  
Student loan debt in the US is over $1.3 billion. You can watch the student loan debt grow in real time here. And it’s no wonder. Over 70% of students in the US take on debt to pay for education. At the same time, over $100 million in private aid (scholarships) go unclaimed on an annual basis. This is why Christopher Gray cofounded Scholly. If you have heard Christopher’s name before, it would not be surprising. He is well known for having been awarded $1.3 million in scholarships, a feat that took him 7 months of hard work. You might also remember the disagreement his pitch caused among the “sharks” on the television show Shark Tank. Scholly is the simple, comprehensive and accurate scholarship matching platform that has helped students win over $35 million in scholarship awards. In less than two minutes, you can input your data and be instantly matched with scholarship opportunities. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Christopher Gray “Scholly is a mobile and web app that makes it simple for high school students and current college students to find scholarships for college.” “Rather than students taking months looking for scholarships, we turn that process into minutes.” “It took me 7 moths just to find the scholarships I wanted to apply for.” “It takes 2 minutes to input 8 parameters and instantly you’re matched with scholarship opportunities.” “We were getting like 9,000 hits to our site per second.” “We were shutting some scholarship sites down because so many people were accessing the site at one time.” “You have to make sure you’re building a business where your financial success correlates directly with your social impact.” “Focus on your data.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Scholly: http://myscholly.com Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

085, Nur-E Farhana Rahman, Knotty Gal | Authentic Startup Life
May 18 2016 29 mins  
Startup life is not for the faint of heart. When Nur-E Farhana Rahman tells you about startup life, she is authentic, transparent and genuine. There are worries about cash flow. There are struggles with hiring the right people and picking the right suppliers. She tells a painful story of falling short on a Kickstarter campaign. In her stories, there is nothing glamorous about startup life. That is not to say that her jewelry startup, Knotty Gal, has not been successful. On the contrary, they have been able to grow the company while bootstrapping. Customers stop them on the street to comment on their products. They have been featured in Forbes Huffington Post, Daily Candy, Conscious Magazine, MSNBC and other news outlets. As their revenues rise, so does their impact. Through Knotty Gal, Nur-E is able to support girls attending Bhandari Girls’ School, one of the first all girls’ school in Bogra, Bangladesh. The school has special meaning to Nur-E. Her great grandfather started the school. Her mother graduated from there. It’s a cause big enough to help her meet every challenge startup life sends her way. Startup Life Quotes from Nur-E Farhana Rahman “We had the cause first. We had no product.” “People started sending me stories. ‘On the subway today, someone asked me about my necklace.’” “Scalability is key.” “I read an article that one in three founders suffers from depression.” “You’re constantly thinking about running out of money.” “We’re constantly comparing our behind the scenes to everyone’s highlight reel.” “We’ve been bootstrapping the entire time.” “You will fail. It’s guaranteed. It’s just a matter of how you bounce back.” “Perseverance is the one key trait that all successful entrepreneurs have.” “Do one thing that scares you” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Knotty Gal: http://www.knottygal.com Tim Ferris article: Hacking Kickstarter: How to Raise $100,000 in 10 Days http://fourhourworkweek.com/2012/12/18/hacking-kickstarter-how-to-raise-100000-in-10-days-includes-successful-templates-e-mails-etc Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

084, Luni Libes, Aviary | Venture Capital Seed Fund for Impact Companies
May 16 2016 29 mins  
Aviary is a new venture capital seed fund, focused on mission-driven, for-profit conscious companies. It is run by Luni Libes. Luni was first a guest on Social Entrepreneur in episode 3. He is our first returning guest. The last time Luni was with us, it was to describe how Fledge, the conscious company accelerator, works. Fledge has graduated 52 companies from their accelerator. They have 7 more in the program right now. As part of our #MoneyMonday in May series, we talked to Luni about several topics: The challenge of finding early seed capital for impact entrepreneurs. Why he started a venture capital seed fund. Luni’s plans to expand Fledge to new cities around the world. And his latest book, The Pinchot Impact Index. If you are an accredited impact investor and you are interested in learning more, Aviary is building a community of co-investors. You can contact Aviary through the contact form on their web site at http://aviary.vc. Quotes from Luni Libes, Aviary Venture Capital Seed Fund “What you do when you have a company that is succeeding, is you figure out how to make it grow and make it bigger and make it have a bigger impact.” “There are definitely more entrepreneurs than capital.” “I’m focusing on the impact investing corner of entrepreneurship.” “It’s a seed venture capital fund for impact companies doing anything impactful anywhere in the world.” “We’re agnostic on sector. We’re agnostic on geography.” “When you look at it from the perspective of the investor, they have a problem when it comes to deal flow and seed investment and writing small checks.” “Accelerators are really good at finding early stage companies, they’re good at training those companies and most important, they’re good at supporting those companies.” “We’re looking for companies before they’re ready for growth capital.” “The way we run Fledge is based on TechStars.” “The current plan is one new city per year for the ongoing future.” “Like most things in business, it’s going to end up being more network than top-down plan.” “The most important skill is storytelling.” “We need to be able to tell stories that are as good as TED talks.” “Nobody sits down and writes a hit.” “Get out of your box and go seek creative advice in other venues.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Aviary: http://aviary.vc Fledge: http://fledge.co Book: The Pinchot Impact Index: Measuring, Comparing, and Aggregating Impact: http://amzn.to/1qlVMnn Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

083, Nokwethu Khojane, Lakheni | South African Townships Called to Action
May 13 2016 41 mins  
Lakheni works in South African townships. If you’re not familiar with the townships of South Africa, during apartheid, these were the areas outside of city centers where black people were required to live. During these years, the South African government failed to invest in infrastructure such as water, sewage, electricity and roads. Without infrastructure, commerce and prosperity have been slow to return to the townships. Nokwethu Khojane, grew up under apartheid, and therefore lived in the township. As apartheid was reversed, she had the opportunity to go to university and to find a meaningful career. Her obvious intelligence and hard work gave her many career choices, but her heart was with the people still in the township. While at the University of Cape Town, Nokwethu studied early childhood education. She wanted to tackle the problems of poverty at the root. One of the courses she took was Social Innovation Lab. Her professor encouraged her to go to the crèche (daycare) in the township and to observe. Even though Nokwethu had been raised in the township, she was still surprised by what she saw. She noticed how the crèche and the families maximized the power of community. They helped one another, shared resources, cooked and generally supported one another. Nokwethu soon realized that this social capital was an asset that could be utilized. With her cofounder Lauren Drake, Nokwethu created Lakheni. One of their projects is to pool the buying power of the families around the crèches. Buy buying in bulk, these families could decrease their direct food costs, and their transportation costs. The crèche benefits by taking a small fee for coordinating. By keeping more of the money in the township, the community is able to stimulate the local economy. This system is a win all around, with a revenue stream that allows Lakheni to continue to provide their services. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Nokwethu Khojane “It felt like something drove me to this.” “Poverty does not necessarily equal deep unhappiness.” “If those of us who have come out can’t go back and try to make a difference, I don’t know who will.” “We’ve got the biggest Gini coefficient in the world and that’s not sustainable.” “It was sitting in the space and allowing it to unfold itself, that the solution came about.” “You’re always in the space of, I actually don’t know.” “This is what this space requires. It requires people who are comfortable in mess.” “You have to be able to see things from your market’s perspective.” “What you think they need is usually not what they need. So, ask them.” “Test it out. Learn. Change it. Test it out again.” “Start small. Start where you are. Start today.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Lakheni: http://lakheni.co.za Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

082, Miriam Haas, Down To Earth Markets | Farmer’s Market as a BCorp
May 11 2016 33 mins  
Farmer’s markets play an important role in our food ecosystem. Miriam Haas has been tinkering with the model of the Farmer’s market for more than 25 years. There’s so much to love about Miriam and the story of Down to Earth Markets. We talked about Farmer’s Markets as a tool for economic development, especially in abandoned town centers. Miriam refers to farmer’s markets as local community-scale businesses that sell neighbor to neighbor. We talked about local produce as an alternative to the industrialization of our food. We talked about eating clean, local and organic. I also found it interesting that Down to Earth Markets has found a way to scale the local farmer’s market model, while being recognized as a “Best for the World” company by B-Lab, the certifying body for B Corporations. Down to Earth Farmers Markets manages fifteen farmers markets in and around New York City. The company was founded in 1991 as Community Markets and rebranded in 2012 as Down to Earth Farmer’s Markets. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Miriam Haas “I wanted to create a sense of community.” “It is an economic development tool.” “It took me four years to locate an organic farmer who would come to the market. That farmer is in his twenty-third year with us.” “I bootstrapped through a Friend of the Market program.” “I was very passionate about doing this work.” “You have to have a passion about an idea.” “If someone says your idea is absurd or discourages you, that’s the thing that should actually activate you.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Down to Earth Markets: http://www.downtoearthmarkets.com Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.


081, Zuleyma Bebell, ImpactAlpha | The TechCrunch and CrunchBase of Impact
May 09 2016 30 mins  
ImpactAlpha provides business reporting in the area of impact investing. ImpactSpace is an open data platform providing information for the impact investing marketplace. It’s easy to see why people compare these two platforms to TechCrunch and CrunchBase. ImpactSpace first came to my attention when NextBillion (Episode 54) announced a media partnership (announcement here). ImpactSpace is quickly becoming the standard profile source for thousands of companies and investors. There you can find the profiles of over 6,000 impact companies, more than 2,000 impact investors and more than 3,000 impact deals. Zuleyma Bebell began her university career thinking that she was going to go into intelligence work. She soon began to notice how a lack of economic opportunity was a root cause of radicalization around the world. When her friend Ravi Kurani told her about his idea for ImpactSpace, Zuleyma replied “Let me know if there is anything I can do to help.” This offer led to the two of them becoming co-founders of ImpactSpace. Eventually they connected with David Bank of ImpactAlpha, which led to an acquisition in April 2015. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes by Zuleyma Bebell "Being part of a startup was never part of my life's goals.” “Data’s important, but if you don’t have the stories to tell, it’s not going to go anywhere.” “[ImpactSpace] is Wikipedia-style.” “We are transparency supporters.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: ImpactAlpha: http://impactalpha.com ImpactSpace: http://impactspace.com Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://tonyloyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

080, Audrey Cheng, Moringa School | Code School for Kenya
May 06 2016 26 mins  
When Audrey Cheng was working with Savannah Fund, Africa’s leading technology seed fund and accelerator, she ran into a problem. She could not find software developers. She noticed that she was not the only one who was experiencing this problem. In fact, a 2011 survey found that, in Kenya, 45% of employers with developer positions were not able to find qualified coders. And the developers they were able to find were very expensive. Many Kenyan companies outsourced work to India, Eastern Europe and other regions. Audrey began to ask questions. With unemployment rates around 40%, and universities teaching computer science, why were there so few qualified developers in Kenya? Audrey realized that Kenyan universities and training schools were not teaching the needed skills. With her cofounder Frank Tamre, Audrey set out to solve her problem. She and Frank created Moringa School. Moringa has three programs. Junior Moringa School teaches basic coding skills. Moringa School is an intensive 16 week bootcamp where aspiring programmers are taught to become world-class developers. And Moringa DevShop provides services to companies around the world. Nearly 100% of Moringa graduates find employment. Many increase their income by 350% as a result of having experienced the program. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Moringa School: http://www.moringaschool.com Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://TonyLoyd.com/Assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts.

079, Nedgine Paul, Anseye Pou Ayiti | Listening as Leadership
May 04 2016 31 mins  
Listening is a key strength of Nedgine Paul. Before launching Anseye Pou Ayiti (Teach for Haiti), she spent more than three years actively listening to her native Haiti. The result of her listening is a highly contextualized solution that turns teachers into community builders. Anseye Pou Ayiti recruits, trains, and supports high-quality teachers where they are needed most. Over the years there have been many stories told of Haiti, from conquest to coups; from corruption to catastrophe. Anseye Pou Ayiti is creating a new narrative of Haiti, one of a capable nation rebuilding itself; one of pride in culture, customs and community. And it all began with listening. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Nedgine Paul: “I think language matters a ton.” “What troubled me was that many of them had school end at sixth grade.” “From that point forward, I’ve been trying to find the answer to that why.” “You want to be a changemaker, you want to have an influence but you have to be informed.” “Zip code does not determine destiny.” “I joined the Partners in Health Team because I wanted to learn from a grassroots organization that had taken a very deep and local approach to building credibility and trust and maintaining longevity.” “Every single voice matters and every single voice can answer the question of what is Haiti at its best?” “I never thought I would be a social entrepreneur a few years ago.” “We launched it in late 2014, but again, that was the culmination of 3 – 4 years of active conversations, active listening and active learning.” “The lens of mediocrity and good enough has killed too many people in Haiti.” “Everything has brought me back to the quality of the classroom teacher and making sure that that teacher sees their influence and their power as extending beyond the four walls of the classroom.” “What is possible when we band together and have true roots in our culture, our customs and our community?” “We believe that if you look inward, it helps a nation to push forward.” “I would not have been able to launch Anseye Pou Ayiti without the help of Echoing Green.” “We’re in the business of creating an entirely new narrative of Haiti and rooting leadership in collective action.” “What you need is a community.” Culture Shift Learning Academy We’re moving closer to the launch of Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://TonyLoyd.com/Assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Anseye Pou Ayiti (Teach for Haiti): http://anseyepouayiti.org/en Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnseyePouAyiti Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anseyepouayiti Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TeachForHaiti Book: Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, a Man Who Would Cure the World: http://amzn.to/23mv3np Teach for All: http://teachforall.org/en Echoing Green: http://www.echoinggreen.org Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment

078, Amit Bouri, the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN) | The Conscious Investor
May 02 2016 42 mins  
Impact investing is always happening, whether we think about it or not. If you put money in a bank account, the bank uses your money and there is an impact. If you invest in the stock market, even if you invest in an index fund of all stocks, your money is still making an impact. The only question is, are you consciously choosing the kind of impact that you want to have. Consumers are waking up, becoming conscious of the impact of their spending in alignment with their values. Millennials are choosing to work in jobs that are more closely aligned to their values. In the same way, investors are beginning to ask questions about impact of their investments. Amit Bouri is a thought leader in the area of impact investing. He is the cofounder and CEO of GIIN, The Global Impact Investing Network. GIIN is a nonprofit with a mission to increase the scale and effectiveness of impact investing. They provide several tools to help anyone from students to impact investors to make data-driven decisions. Their site is rich with answers for general consumers. The GIIN noticed that investors need a common language to describe and compare the social, environmental and financial performance of their investments. Therefore, GIIN has developed IRIS, a catalog of generally accepted performance metrics help impact investors to measure and manage the performance of their investments. Fund managers and investors need a way to find one another. Therefore, The GIIN provides ImpactBase. ImpactBase is a searchable, online database of impact investment funds and products designed for investors. An accredited investor can sort investment opportunities by impact themes (e.g., Green Tech), target geographies, asset class (fixed income, private equity, etc.), status (open, commitments, etc.) and target returns, including risk-adjusted market rates. Impact Investing Quotes from Amit Bouri: “Impact investments are investments made into companies or organizations with the intention of having a positive social and/or environmental impact, alongside financial returns.” “How do we build the capital markets that will support the growth of social entrepreneurs?” “The role of capital is shifting in terms of what people think about what capital should be accomplishing.” “People are thinking about where their values belong very differently.” “It’s really important to think about the impact your assets are having, and they’re all having an impact whether you like it or not.” “I encourage you to think more broadly about your investments. We don’t typically think of our savings accounts as investments.” “As long as you have a bank account, you’re technically an investor.” Announcing Culture Shift Learning Academy In today’s episode, we announce Culture Shift Learning Academy, a comprehensive system to help you flesh out your social impact idea and start achieving it. Enrollment isn’t open yet, but you can join the waiting list with other changemakers. Just go to http://TonyLoyd.com/assessment and enter your email address. As a thank you, I’ll send you the Social Entrepreneur Startup Readiness Assessment. This useful tool is designed to help you to determine where you are on your startup journey and to successfully focus your development efforts. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: The GIIIN: https://thegiin.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/theGIIN Culture Shift Learning Academy waiting list: http://tonyloyd.com/assessment



076, Drew Meyers, Horizon | Building Empathy through Travel with a Trusted Network
Apr 27 2016 32 mins  
Building empathy is the first step in becoming a changemaker. And what better way to build empathy than to travel? But not all travel is created equally. As it has been said, The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page. When you travel, you have choices of just how “local” the experience is. You can stay in a homogenous hotel chain, a local boutique hotel, stay in the home of a close friend, or even stay in the home of a stranger. You might want the most local and authentic experience possible, but how do you know whom to trust? Trust is the currency of the shared economy. Horizon is allowing people to tap into their trusted network to find accommodations from a couch for a night to an apartment for a month. And, by allowing us to tap into our network, we are building empathy. Building Empathy Quotes from Drew Meyers: “This is a really, really unique big world that we live in, but if you really get down to it, and actually talk to people, we’re all in the same boat.” “We enable travel opportunities via community with the long-term end goal of increased empathy in the world.” “There is a very real life lottery that exists in this world, and it’s as simple as where you were born.” “Horizon’s long-term goal is to enable community wherever you are, and unlock opportunities.” “We’re trying to counteract the time-suck economy.” “Really be crystal clear about the why, but don’t be married to the how.” Coaching Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away ten one-on-one coaching calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. This is the last week to enter. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Horizon App: http://www.horizonapp.co Horizon App on Product Hunt: https://www.producthunt.com/tech/horizon-for-android Last week to win a one-on-one coaching call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books


074, Founding and Funding, Part 3 | Sonja Rossteuscher, Triple S Advisory & Consulting
Apr 22 2016 37 mins  
Today’s founding and funding series dives into the area of funding a social venture. I am honored to be joined today by Sonja Rossteuscher of Triple S Advisory & Consulting. Having served as the Chief Financial Officer of the African Development Corporation, Sonja brings a great deal of experience in funding social enterprises at all stages of growth. Sonja took the time today to answer several questions today. In fact, I almost called this episode, “Everything you wanted to know about funding your social venture, but were afraid to ask.” Here are some questions that she tackles: What are some forms of funding that social entrepreneurs can consider? (6:32) What is the difference between an angel investor and a venture capitalist? How do I think differently about an angel investor and a venture capital fund and what they might need? (9:09) When should a startup founder NOT seek capital? What are some pitfalls when seeking capital? (11:30) What is equity and what is dilution? (13:58) Before approaching investors, what should a social entrepreneur have accomplished? (15:49) As a social entrepreneur, how do I find a potential investor? What if I don’t know any angels or VCs? (19:17) What are some common mistakes entrepreneurs make when approaching potential investors? What is the right way to approach an investor? (21:52) Any tips on pitching? (25:39) Other advice to aspiring social entrepreneurs hoping to fund a company? (29:05) Social Entrepreneurship Funding Quotes from Sonja Rossteuscher: “We’re looking at 70% of startup funding in Europe is coming from people’s own savings.” “There is a difficult size to fund too because you might be too big for some people but too small for other institutions.” “Particularly in the space of smaller institutions or larger angel investors at family offices, they want to see more proof of concept. They want to see that your business model has been de-risked.” “I’ve heard it said that there is no such thing as a free lunch. That’s exactly what it looks like when you get investors on board.” “There’s a company that made an app called Yo. You write Yo and someone else can respond Yo. And they raised a million dollars.” “It’s easy to ignore an email. It’s not so easy when you have them on the phone.” “Take the time to figure out which investors care about the pain you’re trying to solve.” “You have to be ready to hear a lot of no’s.” “There is a certain amount of shaping of your message that you can do, while being true to yourself.” “When you’re doing a sales pitch, you’re selling yourself, your business and your idea. The best way to do that is to tell a story.” “It’s really important that the founders, or the people pitching, have the right balance of quiet confidence and enthusiasm.” “Focus on the business of your company if you care about the impact of your company.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Funding Resources: Sonja Rossteuscher on LinkedIn: https://de.linkedin.com/in/sonja-rossteuscher-549896 On Twitter: https://twitter.com/RossteuscherS Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

073, Mathieu Senard, Alter Eco Foods| Earth Day Special on Full Circle Sustainability
Apr 20 2016 33 mins  
In celebration of Earth Day 2016, we’re featuring Mathieu Senard of Alter Eco. Alter Eco is a full circle sustainability company – from the earth to the earth. Their products are organic, fair trade, carbon neutral and, even their packaging is biodegradable. Their mission is nothing short of global transformation through ethical relationships with small-scale farmers, and an integral sustainability orientation at every point on the supply chain. Globally, Alter Eco works with about 25,000 small-scale farmers. For Earth Day 2016 I wanted to feature a food company. After all, of all of the buying decisions we make every day, one of the most frequent and important decisions we make is the kind of food we’re going to consume. As Anna Lappé said, “Every time you spend money, you're casting a vote for the kind of world you want.” Evidently, quite a few people believe that Alter Eco is creating the kind of world that they want. Alter Eco’s US revenues are at $22 million plus an additional $20 – 25 million from their French operations. Their year-over year growth has been around 40 % - 50%. Earth Day Quotes from Mathieu Senard: “From cooperatives to cooperatives.” “We believe cooperation will lead us and give us the tools to build a better world.” “The farmers we work with have on average 1- 2 acres of land.” “It’s based on cooperatives that are owned by the farmers.” “It’s been a bit of pioneer work.” “We went out there, told our stories and gained support from retailers and consumers.” “We saw that the US was a little late as far as the acceptance of fair-trade products, but the market is so powerful.” “There were not many venture capitalist funds who wanted to fund a couple of 23 year-olds who wanted to launch a fair trade brand in the US.” “For us, it’s also about working with investors who are likeminded.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, you can win one of ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Earth Day 2016 Resources: Alter Eco Foods: http://www.alterecofoods.com Earth Day 2016 site: http://www.earthday.org Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

072, Sasha Dichter, Acumen | Impact Measurement with Efficiency, Speed and Rigor
Apr 18 2016 34 mins  
Impact measurement is critical to success as a social entrepreneur. We become social entrepreneurs because we want to make an impact, but how do we measure our impact without detracting from our resources that are making an impact? Investors, business owners and customers can view our impact with different lenses, and therefore have completely different impact measurement needs. Impact measurement can be complex and resource-intensive, but does it have to be? Is there a better way? Sasha Dichter of Acumen has a better idea – lean data. Lean data uses short, simple surveys, delivered via mobile phone to assess whether or not people’s lives are better as a result of our products and services. While the idea of mobile phone surveys is not new, the availability of mobile phones around the world now makes this possible in the poorest regions. Impact Measurement Quotes from Sasha Dichter: “You ask any entrepreneur what the need most after the money, and it’s a great team.” “The ‘here’ where I am now did not really exist when I started my professional life.” “I was on the privileged side of the window, if you will.” “I was always aware that the world is not a particularly fair place, and I’d always hoped I could do something about it.” “In three or four years, every person on the planet will have a cell phone.” “We are using the phones in people’s pockets as a way to reach them.” “We are working with people who are devoting their lives to solving some of the world’s toughest problems.” “What we’re trying to understand is if we are making people’s lives better.” “We want to be fast, we want to be efficient and we want to be rigorous.” “At Acumen, in the first three months of this year, we did a lean data sprint. We had a seven-minute survey, with twelve questions. We surveyed 6,800 customers at 18 companies across six geographies. And each one of these engagements took a couple of weeks.” “Our shift is not only to do more of this, but to make it as easy as possible for others to do it.” “We hope to create a community of practice of lean data users.” “You have to get your hands dirty.” “The work of social change is really hard and takes a long time.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Impact Measurement Resources: Sasha Dichter: https://sashadichter.wordpress.com Acumen+: http://plusacumen.org Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books


071, Founding and Funding, Part 2 | Jesse Finfrock, Morrison & Foerster
Apr 15 2016 38 mins  
Founding and funding a social enterprise requires several practical steps. In today’s episode of Social Entrepreneur, Jesse Finfrock of Morrison & Forester walks us through these steps. With their headquarters in San Francisco, they see a lot of startups take off and other blow up. What makes the difference? Keep in mind that Morrison & Forester is a global firm, working across a global network of 17 offices located in key technology and financial centers in the United States, Asia, and Europe. Their clients include some of the largest financial institutions, Fortune 100 companies, and leading technology and life sciences companies. Jesse works with Morrison & Forester in their impact space, where money meets mission. He works closely with Susan Mac Cormac, who popularized the idea of the hybrid corporation – part for-profit, part nonprofit. Jesse took the time to answer several key question about founding and funding a company. I’ve listed the questions below with a timestamp to make them easier to find in this episode. Founding and Funding Advice from Jesse Finfrock: Is there a difference in how you advise startups versus how you advise mature companies? 05:39 What are some key agreements / assumptions that co-founders should communicate with each other at the beginning? What should be written down and when? 07:48 What is intellectual property (IP), when do you protect it, and what is the best way to do that? 13:21 What are some best practices when splitting equity among co-founders? What is vesting and why is it important? 15:43 When is the right time for co-founders to actually incorporate? Is there a time that it is too early or too late? How do I decide on the corporate form – LLC, Partnership, S-Corp, C-Corp, etc.? 20:44 What are the stages of financing a social enterprise? 26:40 What are some pitfalls that founders can fall into in the early days? 28:17 Key pieces of advice for aspiring or early stage social entrepreneurs 32:35 Founding and Funding Quotes from Jesse Finfrock: “Our social enterprise clients actually have more tension in them than our traditional for-profit clients.” “There are nastier disagreements, and more frequent disagreements in our social enterprises than in our traditional for-profit startups.” “The social enterprises that we see the most success with are those that have aligned profit-making with mission.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, you can win one of ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Morrison & Foerster, Impact: http://mofo.com/impact Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

070, Maria Rodriguez, Byoearth | Overcoming Our Inspirational Story
Apr 13 2016 31 mins  
How Our Inspirational Story Can Keep Us Stuck What happens when our inspirational story keeps us from transformational change? We all have a story. Sometimes those stories hold us back. “I’m not good at math.” “Women aren’t supposed to behave like that.” “It’s too late for me.” Stories can also inspire. They drive our life forward with their narrative. “I’m creating something epic.” “I’m going to help a billion people.” “I overcame adversity to make an impact in the world.” But is it possible that an inspirational story can only take us so far, and, in fact, can become a burden that keeps us from reaching the next level. Maria Rodriguez had a story that she had to overcome. Maria grew up in Guatemala City. Her family owned a coffee plantation. She was a 20-year old, rebellious student. She was a woman in Guatemala. And she was studying the hospitality industry. Her story was on a particular trajectory. While she was at university, a guest lecturer came to speak. In typical fashion, Maria was not listening. But the speaker said something that caught her attention. He described vermicomposting – the process of feeding waste to worms and creating organic fertilizer. The idea intrigued her. She wondered, could she create a business out of this? After drawing up a business plan, she went to her father. Let’s just say that he did not encourage her. However, Maria was determined. She entered a business plan competition sponsored by TechnoServe. She won the competition and with her winnings, Byoearth was born. Byoearth uses worms to convert waste into organic fertilizer. The process is called vermicomposting. They sell the fertilizer to local farmers. They also sell worms and provide technical support. This is a wonderful story of worms turning waste into wealth for women. We could end the story here. But there’s more. Maria told me, “It really helped that I was a woman trying to do something different in the agricultural sector of Guatemala. And I would be invited to a lot of places to speak about it. Because, you have a 20 year-old with worms and she’s so passionate about it, and she’s talking about how you can change the world with them.” “But now, 10 years after, you want to run a social venture, and scale and people are still ‘Oh, Maria, the one with the worms.’ I would like to move out of that, but that’s been a challenge.” The very story that allowed her to successfully launch her business is now keeping her anchored in one place. Maria is ready to scale her impact. To do so, she is going to need a new story. Byoearth is expanding into new territories in Guatemala. They are beginning to sell organic vegetables. And they are launching new businesses. Maria Rodriguez is a wonderful social entrepreneur. To reach her new goals. She is writing a new inspiring story. Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, you can win one of ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Byoearth: http://www.byoearth.com Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

069, Michael Pirron, Impact Makers | How to Scale a Social Enterprise
Apr 11 2016 35 mins  
If you want to know how to scale a social enterprise, Michael Pirron of Impact Makers might be someone to ask. Not only is his company recognized as a “Best for the World” B Corporation, they are also on the Inc. list of Fastest Growing Companies for five years in a row. And, they have been listed as a Best Places to Work. That’s a combination that piques my interest. Impact Makers is a for-profit Virginia benefit corporation that is owned by two non-profits. In 2015, Impact Makers gifted ownership of the company to two organizations that support philanthropy and community development: Virginia Community Capital and The Community Foundation Serving Richmond and Central Virginia. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Michael Pirron: “The typical path is the Warren Buffet or Bill Gates model: work really hard, be an Attila the Hun egregious business man. To make a lot of money is the focus, so that you can have an exit, cash out and then do philanthropy at some point.” “I’m not a trust fund kid. I’m not independently wealthy and I had to pay the mortgage.” “I created a model, selfishly, thinking how can I do well and do good at the same time?” “I started Impact Makers, with me, a laptop and $50 in the bank.” “We didn’t grow despite our model. I think we grew because of it.” “The true secret is our ability to attract and retain talent, because of the model and because people have this desire to find meaning.” “In ten years we’ve had eleven people leave, which is off the charts for an industry that has 15% to 20% annual turnover.” “Mission-aligned teams outperform teams that aren’t.” “Even in our performance reviews with our staff, we start with our values and everything derives from there.” “Our clients are able to hire us and double leverage their already-existing IT consulting expenditure budgets, not just to get quality consulting services, but they can also make community impact.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, you can win one of ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Impact Makers: http://impactmakers.com Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

068, Founding and Funding, Part 1 | Jackie Biederman and Tony Loyd
Apr 08 2016 51 mins  
Founding and funding a social enterprise: how do you start and what do you do? Every Friday in April we’re going to talk about practical tips to help you become a startup founder and how to fund your dreams. Today, we’re going to kick it off by discussing the series with practical advice. The series will touch on 10 different themes: Personal Development – Self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship management Determine my aspirations - Social impact, freelancer, join a company, found a startup, create a small/medium enterprise, system-wide change Design the business - Customer empathy, ideation, problem definition, rapid prototyping, minimally viable products, field testing Define the business - Business model, customer segments, value proposition, product-market fit, channels, partnerships, cost structures, revenue streams Fund the business - Bootstrapping, pitching, friends & family, crowdfunding, angel investors, seed funding, venture capital, Series A Launch the business - Structure, competitive advantage, product development, pricing, distribution, IP Customer relations - Find first 100 customers, awareness, attraction, conversion, retention, resell, upsell, build a tribe Scale the business - Sales, marketing, online presence, SEO, social media, defining choke points Optimize the business - Impact assessment, business metrics, systems, automation, templates Lead the business - Strategy, communication, hiring, coaching, managing, motivating, creating culture To help us kick off the series, I brought in a co-host, Jackie Biederman of the Changemaker Podcast. In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, we talk about: What are the goals for this series? (5:34) What topics will be covered? (8:07) Why are you qualified to talk about this? (11:50) Planning versus doing: which is more important? (14:06) What makes a great leader? (17:21) What are some tips to increase our sense of self-awareness? (20:19) What advice do you have on bootstrapping? (32:47) What are the biggest pitfalls for entrepreneurs to avoid? (37:29) How do you know when it's time to stick with an idea and when it's time to let go? (41:42) What practical recommendations do you have for social entrepreneurs that they can apply today? (43:33) What is one unexpected but important lesson you're learning as you start your company? (45:18) A call to action (47:56) Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Founding & Funding Resources: Changemaker Podcast: http://www.changemakerpodcast.com Book: Opposable Mind: Winning Through Integrative Thinking: http://amzn.to/1VBEbUv VIA Survey of Character Strengths: https://www.authentichappiness.sas.upenn.edu/testcenter Wordle: http://www.wordle.net Blog post on 360-Degree Surveys: http://tonyloyd.com/receive-360-degree-feedback-youre-solo-entrepreneur/ Book: Fascinate, Revised and Updated: How to Make Your Brand Impossible to Resist: http://amzn.to/1qa9Osj Fascination Advantage Assessment and Report: https://ea106.isrefer.com/go/FAA/tonyloyd/ Book and Assessment: StrengthsFinder 2.0: http://amzn.to/1qaawpw Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

067, Teresa Goines, Old Skool Cafe | Start Where You Are
Apr 06 2016 43 mins  
"Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can." Arthur Ashe Teresa Goines is a great example of this Arthur Ashe quote. She started with what she had. Her story starts with her heartbreak as she watched children being discarded into a justice system that was not designed to make them successful adults. When she started working on the Old Skool Café, the only assets she had was her tiny apartment a group of at-risk youth and her community. It took her 8 years move from that apartment into the Old Skool Café’s current San Francisco location. And she still works hard every day to make the supper club a success. Old Skool Café is a youth-run supper club that creates jobs for youth coming out of incarceration, foster care, abusive situations, or other youth who are at-risk. Teresa and her staff create a safe space where these young people can learn and thrive, while making money. The youth not only Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Teresa Goines: “The root cause that I saw is a breakdown of the family and the community around young people.” “I can’t have my opened to this and not do something about it.” “I have a mother’s heart.” “As human beings, we all want to survive, we all want to belong, we want to feel like our life has meaning and purpose, and we want to be loved.” “I wanted them to learn how to get those needs met in healthy ways.” “We need to make our own money so that we don’t have to be reliant on programs and funding that the state can cut.” “The culture is one of encouragement, respect and honor.” “We don’t do it all. I’m a big believer in collaboration.” “Just start taking steps.” “I got over feeling dumb. I asked a lot of questions.” “Ask for feedback.” “Every time I ran into an obstacle, I asked people for help.” “Don’t wait for perfect circumstances to do something to make a difference.” “All of us are here to make a difference.” “Life’s too short to not be living in our passion.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away ten one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Old Skool Café: http://www.oldskoolcafe.org Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books


066, Andrew Stern, Global Development Incubator | Think Differently About Impact
Apr 04 2016 32 mins  
Think Different. You probably remember that as an Apple motto. But Andrew Stern of Global Development Incubator (GDI) applies the think differently model to the social impact space. It takes a different kind of thinking to apply the incubator model to nonprofits, but that’s what GDI does. You have to think differently if you want to help social enterprises go from startups to scale, but that’s what GDI does. You have to think differently about multi-stakeholder initiatives in which philanthropists, government agencies and private organizations team up take on Sustainable Development Goals. Again, that’s what GDI does. One of the initiatives GDI launched in 2016 is Convergence. Convergence is a platform that connects and supports private, public, and philanthropic investors for blended finance deals in emerging and frontier markets. Blended finance uses public and philanthropic funds to attract private capital, in order to achieve positive development outcomes. In other words, blended finance is: Government money + charity funds + private money = social impact. Convergence has an investor and deal network where investors and deals come together in a more efficient way. In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, Andrew Stern explains all of this different thinking. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Andrew Stern: “We’re trying to identify social agitators.” “What is the ultimate pathway to scale of impact that will really make a difference in the world?” “Convergence is the first platform exclusively for blended finance.” “The middle market or mezzanine level still has some gaps, and those gaps go beyond the financing.” “Get in the field and work on the ground.” “Very few of these good ideas are getting to the scale of impact that we want to see.” Mentoring Giveaway: Throughout the month of April, we’re giving away 10, one-on-one mentoring calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing each week. To enter, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Global Development Incubator: http://globaldevincubator.org Convergence: https://www.convergence.finance From Blueprint to Scale: http://acumen.org/content/uploads/2013/03/From-Blueprint-to-Scale-Case-for-Philanthropy-in-Impact-Investing_Full-report.pdf Enter to win a one-on-one mentoring call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

065, Stuart Yasgur, Ashoka Social Financial Services | Using Market Forces for Social Good
Apr 01 2016 33 mins  
Ashoka Social Financial Services Group identifies and supports social entrepreneurs using market forces for social good. If you heard Episode 60 of Social Entrepreneur with Bill Drayton, you heard him talking about the power of a network of leading social entrepreneurs. The Social Financial Services group focuses on social entrepreneurs who are pursuing innovative approaches to access new sources of capital and use market dynamics to create social impact. Stuart Yasgur is just the right guy to run this group. He spent a decade working with startup and growth-stage businesses as a consultant in New York City. He obtained degrees from Cornell, Columbia and the London School of Economics. More than that, when you hear him talk, you realize, he has a heart for this work. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Stuart Yasgur: “The market determines a lot of the character and quality of your life.” “The market has the potential to be transformative. When it works really well it, it can enable us to work together to address seemingly intractable problems.” “The issue is that the market is not working as well as it could.” “We’re seeing the early part of a global change for how people are using and changing finance to enable people to improve their own lives.” “We’re on the ground in over 80 countries around the world looking for leading social entrepreneurs.” “We’re genuinely looking for that one person out of ten million.” “For an entrepreneur, one of the scarcest resources is their own time and energy.” “What’s critical, you see across all of these innovations, they represent the fact that we’re not simply going to grow our way out of the challenges we face today.” “Find changemakers. Seek them out. Find people who have given themselves permission to solve a problem and have acted on it.” ANNOUNCEMENT: Starting this week and going through the month of April, we’re giving away 10, 20-minute, one-on-one coaching calls to help you launch or grow your social enterprise. We’ll be drawing throughout the month. To enter to win the giveaway, go to http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Ashoka Social Financial Services: http://sfs.ashoka.org On Twitter: https://twitter.com/AshokaSFS Stuart Yasgur on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StuartYasgur NEW! Enter to win a 20-minute, one-on-one coaching call! http://tonyloyd.com/coaching Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

064, Amanda LaGrange, TechDump | Social Impact Without Being a Startup Founder
Mar 30 2016 25 mins  
Social impact does not necessarily require you to be the founder of a social enterprise. Amanda LaGrange is living proof of that idea. Amanda spent more than seven years at General Mills, including time as a Senior Financial Analyst. Today, Amanda is the CEO of TechDump. TechDump refurbishes and recycles electronics, and in the process they create jobs for adults facing barriers to employment, especially those who have spent time in the justice system. TechDump accepts anything with a cable, cord or battery that is not a home appliance. Amanda brings her background in corporate finance to bare on the challenges of scaling a social enterprise. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Amanda LaGrange: “It takes a certain skill set for a founder to pass on the baton. “ “It wasn’t necessarily that I birthed the idea, but I’ve definitely been a huge part around growing and scaling it.” “Scaling a social enterprise is one of the most difficult things, because you have to create infrastructure at the same time you’re growing your top line.” “The United States is home to 5% of the world’s population, and yet we incarcerate 25% of the world’s incarcerated people.” “We use 25% of the world’s resources and the [Environmental Protection Agency] reports that we’re only recycling 25% of electronic devices used by consumers.” “There’s no person that’s wasted. There’s no material that’s wasted.” “There’s value and transformation is definitely possible.” “In the state of Minnesota last year, 50 million pounds of electronic waste was collected for recycling, so you can just imagine how much is sitting in people’s basements.” “At TechDump last year, we recycled 5 million pounds.” “From our founding in 2010, we’ve been 98% self-funded.” “50% of our current income comes from the sale of refurbished electronics.” “The more electronics we take in, the more people we can employ.” “About half of our customer base is from the commercial side.” “There’s no clear direct path to be a social entrepreneur.” “Join a [nonprofit] board. You get to practice skills you can’t practice in your day job.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: TechDump: http://www.techdump.org Amanda LaGrange on Twitter: https://twitter.com/GracieLooToday Last week to grab our free eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

063, Gretchen Steidle, Global Grassroots | Conscious Social Change
Mar 28 2016 29 mins  
Gretchen Steidle and Global Grassroots looks for change agents in the most marginalized communities in post-conflict East Africa. Their mission is to catalyze women and girls as leaders of conscious social change. They provide mind-body trauma healing, a conscious social change curriculum, mentors and seed capital. In Conscious Social Change, Global Grassroots emphasizes five key areas: Cultivating presence. Becoming whole Ensuring balance Staying attuned Leading from within Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Gretchen Steidle: “I was intrigued by what it takes to scale and replicate the best ideas.” “I recognized that this is where change was happening. It was happening from the grassroots level up.” “I wanted to find a way to finance more social innovation in the world.” “I found change agents among illiterate farmers who had escaped genocide.” “Here was the niche I felt I could serve best, where rebuilding efforts had already begun, but where grassroots needs were still not being met.” “Everything we do is extremely experiential.” “We incorporate trauma healing work with our change agents.” “Conscious social change is the intersection of mindfulness with social entrepreneurship.” “We teach mindfulness as a leadership principle.” “For example, a water venture might sell water to those who can afford to pay for it, but that underwrites orphan school fees and women’s heath fees and their programming on domestic violence.” “Do not assume you know what is needed.” “Go there, listen, ask questions, engage and support local solutions.” “The more you can recognize that every stakeholder has wisdom that is valuable to the whole, the more quickly you can clearly and accurately define the issue and design a solution that is going to result in long-term transformation.” “Constantly evaluate if what you are doing is really alleviating the underlying social issue.” “The most important thing that we can do is work on our own self-awareness.” “Start with your own breath – by taking three breaths.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Global Grassroots: http://www.globalgrassroots.org Conscious Social Change Toolkit: http://www.conscioussocialchange.org Last week to grab our free eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

062, Aruna Raman, Acara | Global South Supporting Global South
Mar 25 2016 45 mins  
The global south, that is countries south of the equator, are beginning to organize themselves in order to take on their own challenges. Today’s guest, Aruna Raman and I talked extensively about knowledge and talent sharing collaborations across the global south. Who is Aruna? You may remember Fred Rose of Acara from episode 20 of Social Entrepreneur. Every summer, the Acara program at the University of Minnesota sponsors a study abroad program. When the students arrive in Bangalore, Aruna Raman is there to greet them. She introduces them to social entrepreneurs, nonprofits and government officials. She wants the students to see the truth of what it’s like to do business in a complex society like India. Aruna also coordinates a program in the fall where students take their businesses forward to develop a viable business plan. She places these students in social enterprises to work on projects. Aruna and I talked about the importance of local context in social innovation. Aruna also describes how being entrepreneurial is more important than being an entrepreneur. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Aruna Raman: “Be entrepreneurial rather than being an entrepreneur.” “I kept thinking, what is the one thing that would lead organizations to collaborate?” “I feel that there is so much energy directed towards being an entrepreneur that the other roles are forgotten.” “It takes a village to groom an entrepreneur.” “Why don’t we have theories and tools that come from the developing world?” “Bangalore is now overrun with white kids with yoga mats.” “I thought, perhaps we can strengthen the south-south narrative.” “I kept thinking, since India has been at the forefront, how do things work in Kenya or Latin America, and can we share our learnings?” “We can use the collective energy of the global south to codify and document a lot of learnings and present ourselves as a formidable force as well.” “The global south is a force to be reckoned with.” “Never underestimate the power of good research.” “Rapid prototyping only works when you have a firm grasp on what the problem is.” “The more time you spend listening to people, the humbler you will become.” “If I go to a country and I stay for a long period of time, what can the country gain from me?” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Acara: http://acara.environment.umn.edu Aruna Raman on LinkedIn: https://in.linkedin.com/in/aruna-raman-1670b44 Twitter: https://twitter.com/SocEntButterfly Aruna on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aruna.raman eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books


061, Raj Sisodia, Conscious Capitalism, Inc. | Shakti Leadership, Embracing Feminine Energy
Mar 23 2016 29 mins  
Raj Sisodia is one of the thought leaders of the Conscious Capitalism movement. His books Firms of Endearment and Conscious Capitalism were major influences on my thinking about social entrepreneurship. They are part of the reason that I produce Social Entrepreneur today. In this interview, Raj describes the research he conducted and how he began to understand that there was a better way of doing business – a more conscious form of capitalism. He also talks about his new book Shakti Leadership: Embracing Feminine and Masculine Power in Business. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Raj Sisodia: “Joseph Campbell talked about, you need to find your bliss, and you can also follow your heartbreak.” “It felt like we were spending more and getting less [from marketing].” “If you look at the overall impact of about a trillion dollars of spending on marketing, on the lives of customers, and the performance of companies as well as generally on society, I found that there was not a strong positive impact. In fact there were in many ways negative impacts.” “The paradox of profit is, if you pursue profit resolutely with a single-minded focus, you will do things that will harm your ability to generate surplus in the long term.” “Profits cannot be pursued. Profits ensue. They are the outcome.” “This views business as an interconnected, interdependent living system.” “A conscious business calls for a different kind of leader with different motivations.” “The way we lead impact the way people live.” “These companies tend to reflect a lot more of the so-called feminine energy.” “There’s a lot more talk about caring and compassion and nurturing and relationships.” “Many of these companies talk openly about building a business on love.” “After the 19th Century we ended slavery, in the 20th we ended totalitarianism. I think in this century we end the oppression and suppression of women and the feminine.” “Articulate what you stand for and make it explicit.” “Keep in mind that we are also citizens.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Raj Sisodia: http://rajsisodia.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/RajSisodiaCC Conscious Capitalism, Inc. http://www.consciouscapitalism.org Book: Shakti Leadership: Embracing Feminine and Masculine Power in Business: http://amzn.to/1S1k9h1 Book: Everybody Matters: The Extraordinary Power of Caring for Your People Like Family: http://amzn.to/1VwlIZI Book: Conscious Capitalism: http://amzn.to/1VwlXUB Book: Firms of Endearment: How World-Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose: http://amzn.to/1Vwmi9U eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

060, Bill Drayton, Ashoka | Everyone a Changemaker
Mar 21 2016 39 mins  
From the time he was in elementary schools, Bill Drayton was a changemaker. His parents and the principal of the school conspired to allow Bill bloom in his early entrepreneurial efforts. Bill went on the attend Harvard, Oxford and Yale. He worked as a consultant with McKinsey & Company and for the Environmental Protection Agency. Eventually Bill and a few friends took a tour of India by Volkswagen Microbus. This trip changed Bill’s life. In 1980 Bill founded Ashoka and the following year elected the first Ashoka Fellows in India. Bill told me, “There was no word for social entrepreneur. We had to make it up.” Since that time, Ashoka has selected over 3,500 changemakers to be Fellows. Ashoka uses five criteria: An idea that changes the pattern Creativity Entrepreneurial quality Ethical fiber Social impact. Over time, Ashoka has evolved from focusing on individual fellows to a network of fellows to the idea of “Everyone a changemaker.” In this interview, Bill argues that, because the world is in a constant state of change, the key skills of empathy, teamwork, leadership and changemaking are required for every person on the planet. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Bill Drayton: “We need entrepreneurs for human rights and health and education as much as for steel and electronics.” “Over half of the Ashoka fellows have changed national policy within five years of launch. And three-quarters have changed the pattern within five years.” “The world is at a tipping point, from a world defined by repetition, think assembly line or law firm, to one defined by the opposite of repetition, change.” “Once we’re convinced we see the new pattern, then we do something we call collaborative entrepreneurship jujitsu.” “The most powerful force in the world is a big idea if it’s in the hands of a great entrepreneur.” “The first five years, we were learning how to do this.” “Give yourself permission. The world tells you, you can’t. What that usually means is, those who tell you, you can’t, they didn’t. And if you do, they’re going to ask themselves, well did I really live my life well?” “There’s no way the problems outrun the solutions when everyone’s a changemaker, we’re in it for the good of all, and we love working together and we know how to do it.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Ashoka: https://www.ashoka.org Changemakers: https://www.changemakers.com eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

059, Servane Mouazan, Ogunte | Empowering Women Social Entrepreneurs
Mar 18 2016 26 mins  
Servane Mouazan grew up in Britany, France. From an early age she was motivated by social and environmental justice. “It was very diffuse back in the day” she told me. “I just wanted to help.” And help she does. She has been described as a force of nature and as a social entrepreneur with a generous spirit. Today Servane runs Ogunte. Ogunte is a Community Interest Company (CIC) and a Benefit Corporation (B Corp). Ogunte supports women social entrepreneurs by enabling them to learn, lead and connect. Ogunte creates an ecosystem of coaches, mentors, peer support and technical assistance. They have supported over 5200 women social entrepreneurs through business coaching, impact investment, training, leadership development, awards and challenge prizes. They hope to impact over 1 million women by the year 2020. Ogunte works to give women social entrepreneurs a voice, to make them visible and to help them to be effective. They run an incubator called Make a Wave, both in-person and online. Servane is also the Programme Manager for the Womanity Awards by The Womanity Foundation. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Servane Mouazan: “I wanted to have a conversation around social and environmental impact. That’s the only thing I was interested in.” “Give yourself permission to be vocal.” “Don’t allow anyone to push you down for raising important issues.” “Think about a system, not just a product.” “Sometimes it’s not about starting something from scratch. It’s about joining forces.” “Know your boundaries.” “You’re not going to change the world tomorrow by 4 PM.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Ogunte: http://www.ogunte.com/innovation Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ogunte Tumblr: http://oguntewomen.tumblr.com Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ogunte Twitter: https://twitter.com/ogunte YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/Dubaxango/featured eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

058, Jen Ford Reedy, Bush Foundation | Inspire, Equip, Connect
Mar 16 2016 37 mins  
Jen Ford Reedy grew up in Lawrence, KS, a college town. She knew from a young age that she wanted to do something meaningful with her life. As an adult, she spent 9 years as a consultant with McKinsey & Company where she honed her strategic business skills. In 2008 she moved into philanthropic work first as VP of Strategy with Minnesota Philanthropy Partners. In 2012 she moved into the role of President of the Bush Foundation. It’s a role that seems to suit her blend of keen strategic insights and a heart for good. The Bush Foundation is an independent, private philanthropic foundation. It was created in 1953 by Archibald Bush, one of the people who built 3M to the success it is today. They have a broad mandate, but of course, Jen understands that every choice made has an opportunity cost. Together with her staff and her board they make careful choices about how to best use their resources. They have a very active and productive fellowship program. They also have a number of grant programs available: The Bush Prize for Community Innovation Community Creativity Cohort Community Innovation Grants Education Ecosystem Grants Leadership Network Grants Major Investments - Education Native Nation Rebuilding Grants. The Bush Foundation focuses on Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and 23 native nations. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Jenn Ford Reedy: “There are very few charitable institutions that have the degree of flexibility that we have.” “Philanthropic strategy is all about opportunity cost.” “We think of our work as investing in great ideas and the people who power them.” “When we talk about purpose, we talk about inspiring and supporting creative problem solving.” “We talk about ‘inspire, equip and connect.’” “Consider intrapreneurship.” “Surround yourself with a group of people who will be honest with you on what you need to work on.” “Make the world your learning lab.” “If you can boil down, ‘what are the competencies I need’ and then think creatively about how you can get them, I think you can actually, for zero dollars per day, have a pretty good training program.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Bush Foundation: http://www.bushfoundation.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bushfoundation Twitter: https://twitter.com/bushfoundation LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/644935 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bushfoundation Jen Ford Reedy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fordreedy eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books



056, Mike Lwin, Koe Koe Tech | Using Health Technology to Jumpstart a Broken Health System
Mar 11 2016 22 mins  
Health technology social enterprise Koe Koe Tech is leapfrogging Myanmar’s broken healthcare system into the 21st Century. Myanmar is a product of its complex history. The country has over 100 ethnic groups and long-running internal tensions. Myanmar was a British colony from the 19th century through 1948. After independence, religious and ethnic tensions flared and by 1962, Myanmar fell into military rule. Ongoing political uncertainty and isolation left Myanmar with, among other problems, a broken healthcare system. The World Health Organization ranks Myanmar as second to last in Global Health Indicators, 190 out of 191 countries. Mike Lwin is a Myanmar-American. In 2009 he was living in Washington, D.C. and working as an antitrust lawyer working on antitrust M&A and litigation. That year he visited Myanmar when he met his cousin Yar Zar Minn Htoo. Mike was struck by how, because of the lottery of geography, the two of them were experiencing very different health outcomes. On average, Myanmar citizens have a life expectancy nearly 20 years less than an American. In 2010 Myanmar held democratic parliamentary elections and began to open to the world. By 2012 Mike was in Myanmar working with his cousin Yar Zar to design what would eventually become Koe Koe Tech. One interesting phenomenon of Myanmar’s late opening to the world is that the Myanmar people bypassed the feature phones with SMS and went straight to Android smartphones. More than 90% of the phones in the country are smart phones. Therefore Koe Koe Tech can deliver media-rich apps, with they use to deliver their maymay app that provides informational messages about pregnancy, maternal and child health. Koe Koe Tech is also building the first validated databases of doctors in the country. They are doing all of this with a team that values the high diversity of Myanmar. With the exception of Mike, all of Koe Koe's employees are citizens of Myanmar. Their team includes Buddhists, Muslims, Christians, Burmese and ethnic minorities. They also create employment opportunities in the tech industry for women. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Mike Lwin: “We find that people are more productive when people are in a diverse workforce and exposed to people from different backgrounds.” “Myanmar is exceptional since it opened up late, its population has leapfrogged Nokia feature phones.” “You can go out into a rural area, which I did, and talk to women harvesting rice or men cutting wheat in the fields; they will all have Android smart phones.” “Myanmar is ranked second to last for WHO Health Indicators.” “Myanmar has about half the doctors per capita as other countries in the region.” “Much more valuable is going out there and talking to the people you want to use your products or service and asking them what they want.” “We have also learned to seek mentors.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: com page. Donate today: https://www.generosity.com/medical-fundraising/save-the-lives-of-mothers-and-children-in-myanmar--2 Koe Koe Tech: http://koekoetech.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/KoeKoeTech Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/koekoetech MayMay App on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/maymayapp eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

055, Wendy Lipton-Dibner, Author, Focus on Impact
Mar 09 2016 22 mins  
The desire to make a sustainable difference, an impact, is a megatrend that social researcher Wendy Lipton-Dibner has been tracking for years. Wendy is a best-selling author. Her latest book is Focus On Impact, The 10-Step Map to Reach Millions, Make Millions and Love Your Life Along the Way. Keep in mind, when Wendy says “impact” she uses a broader definition than one might use when talking about impact investing. Still, for more than 35 years, Wendy has been researching the question of why focusing on impact leads to greater business outcomes. Wendy points to “the social shift” that occurred when social media became widely used. Suddenly, one-way corporate pronouncements were not sufficient. Conscious consumers wanted to engage with businesses in a two-way dialog. As baby boomers begin their exit strategy and millennials take a stand in the workplace, the desire to make an impact is becoming central to business. Wendy shared her story generously, enough so that, for the first time, we are offering an extended play version of this interview. You can find it here: http://traffic.libsyn.com/tonyloyd/SE055-EXTENDED.mp3 Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Focus on Impact: http://focusonimpact.com/ The Action Movement: http://www.theactionmovement.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/ImpactExpert Extended version of the interview: http://traffic.libsyn.com/tonyloyd/SE055-EXTENDED.mp3 eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

054, Scott Anderson, NextBillion | Social Entrepreneurship through a Journalist’s Lens
Mar 07 2016 41 mins  
Scott Anderson sees social entrepreneurship through the eyes of a journalist. He has been the Managing Editor of NextBillion since 2010. In 2004, C. K. Prahalad published his groundbreaking book Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty through Profits. At the time, Scott Anderson was a business journalist in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He had a chance to read the book and to interview C. K. Prahalad. It left an impression. A few years later, the World Resources Institute published The Next Four Billion, a study of the market size and business strategies to reach the base of the pyramid. As a follow-up to this report, the World Resources Institute launched the NextBillion.net web site. By 2010, the site was managed by the William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan. They hired Scott to be their managing editor. Scott is in a unique position to observe the field of social entrepreneurship. In this wide-ranging interview we discuss areas as diverse as impact assessments, healthcare and financial technology. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Scott Anderson: “But I think back at that time, it was very much ‘What is this? Are you serious about the idea that you can profit and you can help people emerge from poverty?’” “We really want to be a laboratory for thought and action.” “If you are a social entrepreneur, being able to show that you’re making an impact, is as important as investment, in fact it’s what’s going to get you an investment.” “You see these large companies like GE Healthcare and Johnson & Johnson trying to penetrate the market with low-cost diagnostic tools. But you also see startup companies going into hospitals and clinics.” “So much news has broken around FinTech, it’s almost becoming a site unto itself.” “The pace of change, technologically speaking, is happening so quickly, that it’s lowering the barriers to entry.” “Stay flexible.” “Give more than you receive.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty through Profits, http://amzn.to/1psSnTP NextBillion: http://nextbillion.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NextBillionnet-51114324653 Twitter: https://twitter.com/NextBillion Next Billion Finance Twitter: https://twitter.com/NextBillionFI Next Billion Healthcare on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NextBillionHC LinkedIn Group: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/1816539/profile eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

053, Katy Ashe and Edith Elliott, Noora Health | Design Thinking to Improve Health Outcomes
Mar 04 2016 31 mins  
The founders of Noora Health utilized design thinking to iterate their way to dramatically improved patient outcomes. It started at Stanford University’s dSchool. When Katy Ashe was an engineering student at Stanford University, she was anxious to find ways to apply her skills. She signed up the d.School’s “Design for Extreme Affordability” class. There she met Edith Elliott. Edith had a background in international policy. They were paired with medical students Shahed Alam and Jessie Liu. Together they were assigned a group of cardiac hospitals in Bangalore. When the team visited the hospitals, they were confronted by a system stretched to the limits by demand. The hospital staff was stretched, and requested that the team focus on improving the flow of patients through the system. However, by “living a day in the life” of the stakeholders – from the CEO to the janitors, to the patients and their families, they noticed an unusual pattern. Yes, the hospital staff was overwhelmed, however, there standing in the hallways was a highly underutilized asset – the families of the patients. As in many cultures, when a patient is in the hospital for cardiac care, they are surrounded by a large number of family members, most of whom would like nothing more than to be helpful. Using design thinking, Edith, Katy and the team asked “How might we better leverage this underutilized resource?” The answer to that question eventually became Noora Health Noora Health provides training materials and train-the-training for hospital staff. The hospital staff trains patients and their families with actionable health skills to improve outcomes and save lives. For post cardiac surgery training, they train in 12 simple tasks. An initial survey showed a 24% reduction in post-surgical readmissions, and a 36% reduction in post-surgical complications. After a more thorough study conducted through Stanford University, the results were even more stunning, showing a 71% reduction in post-surgical complications. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Katy Ashe and Edith Elliott: “We thought ‘How might we better leverage this existing resource?’” Edith “There was so much pain around very simple gaps in information” Katy “We made hundreds of tiny prototypes and showed them to the families.” Katy “We’ve built design thinking into everything that we do.” Edith “We’ve focused on teaching high-leverage, low-risk skills to family members.” Katy “We are a bit data obsessed.” Edith “It’s time to scale and bring this to more hospitals.” Edith “Don’t feel like all of the answers need to come inside of yourself.” Katy “Talk to your users!” Edith Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Noora Health: http://www.noorahealth.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/noorahealth Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/noorahealth Twitter: https://twitter.com/NooraHealth Stanford, Design for Extreme Affordability: http://extreme.stanford.edu eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books



051, Kago Kagichiri, Eneza Education | Spreading Education through EdTech
Feb 29 2016 34 mins  
Kago Kagichiri is obviously exceptionally bright. He built his first mobile app in 2001 when he was 12 years old. But he was a restless student. He told me, “I had a lot of problems with the school system. I didn’t see any relevance in what we were learning.” These two worlds, technology and education, would eventually meet in an unexpected way and plunge him deeply into the world of education technology or EdTech. In 2011, Kago met Toni Maraviglia. Toni was an educator who was frustrated with the fact that 68% of Kenyan children never make it to high school. And no wonder. Many schools have a ratio of 60 students per teacher and, perhaps even worse, four students per text book. Toni had developed a flashcard methodology that was helping her students a great deal, but without a technology solution, she was not able to scale her idea. While she was looking at this problem, she also noticed that 95% of adult Kenyans have a cell phone. That is when she met Kago at the iHub. Together, they formed Eneza Education. Eneza is the Swahili word for spread. Eneza Education is using EdTech to spread the reach of education. They turn any mobile device, including simple phones with only SMS capability, into a virtual school. You can see Toni tell the story of Eneza Education here: https://vimeo.com/71070369. Since 2011, Eneza has reached around 630,000 students. They currently have around 50,000 active students every month. The top 100 students together have sent over 8,000,000 messages to the Eneza system. One user alone has interacted with the platform more than half a million times. They are seeing definite upward trends in test scores and are seeing a rapid adoption rate. They recently moved beyond Kenya to Tanzania and Ghana. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Kago Kagichiri: “The two things that people spend the most on in Kenya are mobile airtime and education. To wrap those two together makes it pretty convenient for the users.” “Our top 100 students have exchanged about 8 million messages with the platform.” “Imelda, who always shows up in the top 10, last year exchanged 500,000 messages with the platform.” “You can’t ignore how users use your product.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Eneza Education: http://enezaeducation.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnezaEducation Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnezaEducation eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

050, Tom Osborn, GreenChar | Social Entrepreneurship Comes Early
Feb 26 2016 35 mins  
Social entrepreneurship came early to Tom Osborn. When Tom was 17 years old, his mother became ill with a severe lung infection. This is not an uncommon experience for those who cook indoor with firewood and charcoal. 18,000 people in Kenya die annually due to the effects of cook stove smoke. According to the World Health Organization: Around 3 billion people cook and heat their homes using open fires and simple stoves burning biomass (wood, animal dung and crop waste) and coal. Over 4 million people die prematurely from illness attributable to the household air pollution from cooking with solid fuels. More than 50% of premature deaths due to pneumonia among children under 5 are caused by the particulate matter (soot) inhaled from household air pollution. This makes in-home air pollution from cooking and heating to be the third highest cause of death behind alcoholism and tuberculosis. Cooking and heating with biomass is also destroying the forests of the world. Every year Kenya loses 50,000 hectares of forest due to firewood and charcoal production. We’ve established that charcoal production is a big problem. It also involves big dollar. In Kenya charcoal production is a $500,000,000 industry. Across Africa, it is a $10 billion industry. These facts: Tom’s personal story, the size of the problem and the size of the market conspired together to set Tom Osborn on the path to social entrepreneurship at the age of 17. It started when he and his cofounder signed up for a business incubator competition. They won first place, which netted them $3,000. GreenChar uses sugar cane waste to make alternative cooking fuel. In 2014, Tom became an Echoing Green Fellow. Tom talked about the benefits of Echoing Green. He told me that it gave him credibility. It also connected him with likeminded people. This credibility and the introductions that Echoing Green was able to make. He told me that his time with Echoing Green took his business to the next level. Tom was also able to go through a cohort at Fledge, the Conscious Company Accelerator. (You may recall my interview with Luni Libes in episode 3.). Tom told me that his time at Fledge helped him to understand how to run his business from A to Z. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Tom Osborn: “I never envisioned myself as a social entrepreneur. I wanted to solve a problem that affected me as an individual.” “It started with my family, then my neighbors, then my neighbor’s neighbors, and then their neighbors.” “We reached the point where the demand for what we were doing was exceeding what we could produce as an organization. It made me realize that we were on to something here.” “For a first-time social entrepreneur, fellowships and socially conscious accelerators can play a big role in helping you get to the next level.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: GreenChar: http://www.greenchar.co.ke Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greencharKE/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/greencharkenya Tom Osborn on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TomLeeOsborn Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/greencharofficial/ eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

049, Duncan Ward, Classroom of Hope | Social Impact through Collaboration
Feb 24 2016 35 mins  
We all want to have a social impact, whether we want to start a neighborhood garden or provide clean water in sub-Saharan Africa. And yet, for many of us, we hesitate. We might be afraid or feel ill equipped. Or we might feel like we do not have the time. Sometimes it takes a significant emotional event to shake us up and to send us on a journey to social impact. Duncan Ward has just such a story. After the death of his brother, Duncan picked up his backpack and set off into the world to find meaning and purpose. While traveling in Cambodia, Duncan met Racky. Racky is a former child slave in the Pol Pot regime. Because Racky understand the importance of education, he uses his money to provide education for local children. With a little investigation, Duncan found out just how big of a problem the lack of access to education is. 121 million children of primary and secondary education age do not have access to schools. 250 million children globally cannot read or write. Duncan also found that UNICEF has a standard for judging the health of a school called the Child Friendly School. UNICEF provides a standard assessment for rating schools on a range from 0 - 100. One of the secrets of success of Classroom of Hope is that they do not try to solve the problem of access to education alone. They develop "smartnerships" with the best local organizations who have the vision, drive and community standing to create change. In 2015, Classroom of Hope completed their first programs with a batch of 15 schools. At the beginning of the program, the schools on average received a rating of 36% child friendly. After completing the Classroom of Hope program, the schools averaged a score of 79% child friendly. In these same schools, dropout rates went from 10% to 2%. In this interview on Social Entrepreneur, Duncan Ward shares his journey and the lessons he has learned along the way. Something Simple You can Do: If you are inspired by this story, here is something simple that you can do. You can retweet this: https://twitter.com/TonyLoyd/status/702248382983708672 Or this: https://twitter.com/TonyLoyd/status/702253841648111616 Or you can go to the Classroom of Hope web site and pick your favorite picture to tweet out. Be sure to tag Classroom of Hope. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Classroom of Hope: http://classroomofhope.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/classroomofhope Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClassroomOfHope Twitter: https://twitter.com/classroomofhope Duncan Ward on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_DuncanWard Duncan on LinkedIn: https://au.linkedin.com/in/duncan-ward-316b891 UNICEF Child Friendly Schools: http://www.unicef.org/cfs TED Talk, Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen!: https://www.ted.com/talks/ernesto_sirolli_want_to_help_someone_shut_up_and_listen eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

048, Astrid Scholz, Sphaera | Unleashing $100 Billion in Value for Social Impact
Feb 22 2016 35 mins  
If there were ever an industry that is ripe for disruption, it’s what we might call the social change industry – charitable organizations, NGOs, government organizations and other change makers. That’s primarily because of inefficiencies of information across the industry. If only someone would come along to collapse the barriers to collaboration, think how much more social impact we could have. There is a number attached to that inefficiency in the social impact marketplace, and that number is $100 billion. Sphaera is a social enterprise dedicated to accelerating the pace of change. They offer a cloud-based solution-sharing platform. They collect and curate solutions (best practices, case studies, interventions, etc.) and make them accessible to other solution-seekers around the world. Today on Social Entrepreneur, we speak with Astrid Scholz. Astrid began Sphaera out of a personal pain. As part of a 20th year celebration with an NGO where she worked, they brought together 50 bioregional organizations. They soon realized just how many solutions they had among themselves, most of which were locked up behind firewalls. They decided to do something about it. It was from this desire for collaboration across social enterprises that Sphaera was born. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Astrid Scholz: “We said, what if we started by making it easy and rewarding for practitioners everywhere to discover, share and reuse existing solutions?” “It’s about surfacing the abundance of solutions and putting them into the hands of practitioners.” “It turns out that that behavior, in aggregate, creates a $100 billion inefficiency in the social change industry.” “Every time in history that an industry has exhibited information asymmetries, it’s eventually disrupted.” “There’s something really interesting going on culturally and technologically that makes this the right time to try something very different in our industry.” “The more services we sell, the more aggressively we act like any other enterprise SaaS company, the more social good we create.” “Find a real world problem and a real organization that may need your help.” “Trust the pain that you are feeling.” “I was solving a pain and I ended up with a business.” “I believe in the competitive advantage of collaboration.” “You have to be authentic and aligned with your values in every single thing you do.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Sphaera: http://www.sphaera.world Twitter: https://twitter.com/SphaeraInc Medium: https://medium.com/@ajscholz Book: Blessed Unrest: How the Largest Social Movement in History Is Restoring Grace, Justice, and Beauty to the World: http://amzn.to/1oCx3ev Book: The Responsible Entrepreneur: Four Game-Changing Archetypes for Founders, Leaders, and Impact Investors: http://amzn.to/1oCwRvR eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

047, Sammie Rayner, HandUp | Social Good in Your Neighborhood
Feb 19 2016 33 mins  
When it comes to social good, we often think we have to do something world-changing. In his book All the Trouble in the World, P. J. O'Rourke said “Everybody wants to save the earth; nobody wants to help Mom do the dishes.” If you think about it, that’s human nature. We love the grand gesture, the transformational speech or the disruptive technology. In the meantime, we pass homeless people on the street and we wonder what to do. I understand this feeling well. I’ve often been torn while thinking about how best to serve: do I give a homeless person cash, perhaps enabling them to practice alcoholism? Or, do I walk by without making eye contact? Well, HandUp has a different approach. Sammie Rayner is one of the cofounders of HandUp. You could say that the universe conspired to set her up for just this type of work. Her parents were business owners. As a young person, Sammie cared for her grandfather as he was suffering from Alzheimer's disease. These two early influences seemed to set her on a journey to discover business models that do social good. As a college student, she heard Dr. Muhammad Yunus speak at her university. She also read his book Banker To The Poor. This sent Sammie on a journey of discovery. She dug into the concept of social enterprises and microfinance. In her research, she found that, despite the success of microfinance around the world, less than 5 percent of microfinance borrowers lived in Sub Saharan Africa. And of that small percentage, less than half of the loan resources were available to people in rural areas. This discovery led to the establishment of a microfinance non-profit, Lumana Credit, in 2009. Lumana was acquired by Sinapi Aba Trust (SAT) in April, 2013. By October of that same year, Sammie joined HandUp as a cofounder, joining Rose Broome and Zac Witte. HandUp is a platform for giving directly to people experiencing homelessness. They partner with more than 20 agencies who screen the campaigns. HandUp provides donors with a simple way to impact the lives of homeless neighbors. How big is this problem? According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, In January 2015, 564,708 people were homeless on a given night in the United States. Of that number, 206,286 were people in families. In just over two years, donors have helped over 1,500 people reach more than 4,000 goals and raise more than $1 million. That homeless person we were talking about at the beginning of this conversation? You can help them with a particular project. If you’re in San Francisco, you can even give them a safe gift card. And here's the thing. When we aggregate all of these small acts of social good, we really do change the world. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Sammie Rayner: “These two influences seemed to always come up in my life of loving business, but also wanting to find a way to incorporate social change.” “Something I think really struck me. I’ve been working across the globe, and there’s this huge problem right here in the states.” “What I’ve learned from both ventures is the importance of starting really small.” “Incorporate the people you want to help as soon as possible.” “Get to know your homeless neighbors.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: HandUp: https://handup.org Titter: https://twitter.com/handup Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/handup.us Book: Banker To The Poor: Micro-Lending and the Battle Against World Poverty: http://amzn.to/1KWm896 Book: All the Trouble in the World: The Lighter Side of Overpopulation, Famine, Ecological Disaster, Ethnic Hatred, Plague, and Poverty: http://amzn.to/1PR4WP0 eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books



045, Francesco Piazzesi, Echale a tu casa | Housing as Community Development
Feb 15 2016 36 mins  
Francesco Piazzesi grew up in the construction equipment industry. He noticed that the brick mason who spent his days building houses went home to a tin shack with a dirt floor. In many countries around the world, including Mexico, 2/3 of the houses built are built by the owners. The homeowners gather whatever materials they can afford and, step by step, over many years, they build their house. These houses are often not safe or sanitary and the vast majority have dirt floors. These houses also are not desirable, therefore, the homeowners do not build wealth to pass along to their family. From 1987 to 2006, Francesco tried to solve the problem through a charitable organization. However, he found that he was unable to scale his impact through philanthropy alone. So in 2006, Francesco formed Echale a tu casa, a social enterprise that provides housing to the masses, especially those at the bottom of the economic pyramid. Echale has a machine that presses dirt into adobe building blocks, which reduce greenhouse gasses by more than 30% compared to concrete blocks. The blocks are also 60% less expensive than traditional building materials. Using Echale’s methodology, home construction costs are approximately $10,000. When Echale comes into a community, they organize the local villagers. They provide education in everything from social inclusion to family violence to alcoholism. They also provide technical training and financial training. A family that wants to build a home must first save 10% of the cost of construction, plus the land. Echale teaches the family to put away a small amount of money, week by week, until they have built up their savings. The amount that is put away week by week, is the same amount the family will need to pay for their mortgage. As families in the village put their money away, they are creating community financing which can be used to build homes. Echale trains local community members to build houses. 80% of the labor comes from the local community, creating construction jobs. After the initial round of housing, Echale has a franchise model that allows the local community to continue the process of home construction after Echale is gone. The homes are energy efficient. They also have special engineering to help them capture rainwaterand purify the water. They have bio digesters to deal with waste water. And they have solar panels for energy. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Francesco Piazzesi: “The mason who builds the house, lives in a tin shack. He sleeps on a dirt floor.” “It’s not a giveaway program or philanthropy. It’s a development program.” “We started as a social business in 2006. Before that we were an NGO, but we figured out that we had no impact. We could not replicate the model or scale the model.” “The family was spending up to 30% of their income repairing the tin house. Now they use the same amount or less to build a home.” “We need to build a more equal society. We have this tools which is housing.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Echale a Tu Casa: http://www.echale.com.mx Twitter: https://twitter.com/echalemx Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/echalemx YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/echaleMx Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+EchaleMx1 Last Day! Fair Anita Quote Giveaway Remember that at midnight tonight, we’re giving away a pair of earrings from Fair Anita. Be sure to enter by the end of the day, February 15, 2016. A winner will be drawn on Tuesday, February 16, 2016. Click here for details.

044, Miki Agrawal, THINX | A Serial Social Entrepreneur
Feb 12 2016 39 mins  
Being a serial social entrepreneur seems to be in Miki Agrawal’s blood. You can read her story in her very fine book, Do Cool Sh*t: Quit Your Day Job, Start Your Own Business, and Live Happily Ever After. After a wakeup call on September 11, 2001, Miki determined to live her life with her eyes wide open. She left her role in investment banking to play professional soccer, and produced films. In 2005 she stared having recurring stomach aches. She realized that she was intolerant of additives, hormones and pesticides that were in the mass-produced food she was eating. In 2006, she opened a pizza restaurant, WILD in New York City. Like most women, Miki has experienced an incident or two with her period – soaking through her jeans or once having to run out of an important meeting. When she and her twin sister Radha had to suddenly leave a three-legged race at a family picnic, they had an ah-ha moment. They wanted to make underwear that protected women during their period. While contemplating the idea, Miki traveled to the World Cup in South Africa where she met a school-aged girls. After Miki teased her for not being in school, the girl explained that it was her “week of shame.” Miki learned that women and girls in third-world countries were missing school because of their period and this led to a high drop-out rate. Miki decided to do something about it, and THINX was born. THINX not only produces beautiful period-proof underwear, they use their profits to support AfriPads, a producer of washable, reusable period protection. With two full-time businesses running, one might think that Miki has enough on her plate, but today she also runs two other social enterprises. Icon produces pee-proof underwear that keeps women dry and odor-free from little leaks. They use their profits to support the Fistula Foundation. Tushy produces and sells a bidet attachment for toilets, improving sanitation and health, while reducing paper and water usage. They use their profits to support organizations like charity:water. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Miki Agrawal: “Doing cool sh*t, requires doing.” “If you say ‘How can I help you?’ before ‘How can you help me?’ doors just open wide.” “Hundreds of millions of girls are missing school when they have their period and millions of girls are dropping out of school because of their periods, that’s billions of dollars of lost income potential that these communities could be receiving to elevate themselves out of extreme poverty.” “The thought that kept occurring to me was, ‘That could have been me! My dad came here from India with five dollars in his pocket.” “It was a big wake up call for me. It was my big ah-ha moment. That’s when I realized that the mystery of life is, you never know when it’s going to end.” “I feel like, to be an entrepreneur, you need to have a very healthy level of naiveté. If you realize what it will take to get things launched and done, it’s very daunting.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: Do Cool Sh*t: Quit Your Day Job, Start Your Own Business, and Live Happily Ever After: http://amzn.to/1QWyeOQ Miki: http://www.mikiagrawal.com THINX: http://www.shethinx.com Icon: https://www.iconundies.com Tushy: https://www.tushy.me Wild: http://eatdrinkwild.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mikiagrawal Twtter: https://twitter.com/twinmiki Fistula Foundation: https://www.fistulafoundation.org AfriPads: http://www.afripads.com eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Fair Anita Quote Giveaway Announcement! Remember that we’re still giving away a pair of earrings from Fair Anita. The giveaway ends February 15, 2016. Click here for details.

043, Mike Vo, we2o | $62.4 B in Untapped Funds for Charitable Giving
Feb 10 2016 36 mins  
Charitable giving seems to be stuck in a time warp. While we easily bank, shop and communicate across mobile apps, online charitable giving is not always the best user experience. This poor user experience came to the attention of Tesla Motor’s Director of Quality Product Engineering, Mike Vo. Something else came to Mike’s notice. After 5 years of working 90+ hours per week with almost every day of the year, his accrued personal time off, or vacation time, was about to be forfeited. Mike wondered how common this problem was, and if he could do something with those unused vacation hours. In the US alone, every year there is $52.4 Billion in accrued, unused vacation time. That’s a lot of value that can be put to use. Also, every year, US companies set aside $10 billion in matching funds that go unused. So, these three factors: a poor user experience with many charity web sites, $52.4 billion in untapped wealth and another $10 billion in matching funds seemed like a compelling business case to Mike Vo. Today, Mike runs we2o. We2o is the world's first philanthropy platform to enable donation of unused vacation time. You can donate unused vacation time to your favorite causes. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Mike Vo: “At the end of the day, what we want to do is two things. One, we want to find new, worthwhile, compelling buckets of money to funnel to charities that do amazing work. And two, we want to bring technology to the game to propel and improve the user experience.” “I did a bit more research and what I realized is that every year, there is $52.4 billion dollars in unused vacation time.” “Online charitable giving is still stuck below 10%.” “Giving in the US has been stuck at 2% GDP since the ‘70s.” “Every year, people in the US give about $300 billion…But we have almost 1.5 million charities.” “US corporations set aside $10 billion in matching funds every year that go unused.” “Every 30 seconds a child dies from a lack of nutrition. “ “Every 60 seconds a child dies from a lack of access to clean water.” Social Entrepreneurship Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books we2o: https://we2o.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/we2o.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/we2o_ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/we2o Fair Anita Quote Giveaway Announcement! Remember that we’re still giving away a pair of earrings from Fair Anita. The giveaway ends February 15, 2016. Click here for details.

042, Neetal Parekh, Innov8social | An Easy Button for Social Impact
Feb 08 2016 36 mins  
Social impact expert Neetal Parekh was born in Oklahoma City. Her parents had immigrated from India. She and her family moved frequently, about 20 times in 20 years. When Neetal and her family visited their family in India, she observed the gap between wealth and abject poverty. Even as a child, she thought about how she could close that gap – to make an impact. Neetal trained as an attorney and, as part of her job, she wrote blogs about changes in law. In 2011, California proposed two pieces of legislation that allowed for-profit companies to pursue social impact while reducing the threat of legal action from activist shareholders. Neetal was so moved by this concept of social impact companies, she started blogging at Innov8Social.com. Today, Innov8social is an online platform, an easy button for anyone who is trying to engage in social impact. They do that through a web site, blog, podcast, a book, online courses and other resources. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Neetal Parekh: “What’s been amazing is moving to Silicon Valley and seeing these entrepreneurs thinking about ‘how can we use this rocket ship of business to create social impact.” “How do we use all of these hours that we work and align with our intent to improve the world that we live in?” “When you move a lot, you have roots in different countries and different places; I think you start to see the world with a different lens.” “I lost my mom to cancer in my last year of graduate school. I think when you go through something like that, it just shifts this idea that, all of our days are super limited. Whatever we have to give or collaborate, that’s what’s going to potentially continue.” “Engage in whichever way you can.” “What is the way I want to create social impact in my life, in my work, in my career? Put that in a sentence.” “One day we won’t even use the phrase social entrepreneurship because it will be part of entrepreneurship.” “I don’t think we realize our potential to create an impact, and the collective impact we can have together.” #GoAndDo Tweet Challenge! How do you want to create social impact: in your life, in your work or in your career? Tweet your answer to this question using the hashtag #GoAndDo. I’m going to be watching twitter for this hashtag. You and your tweet could be mentioned in a future episode of Social Entrepreneur. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: Book: 51 Questions on Social Entrepreneurship: Social Impact Through Business, An Actionable Q&A: http://amzn.to/1Rfhh47 Udemy Course: 8 Things Everyone Should Know About Social Entrepreneurship: http://bit.ly/Neetal The Impact Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/innov8social-podcast-impact/id1052370582 Innov8Social: http://www.innov8social.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/innov8social Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/innov8social LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/innov8social YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/waiting628 Google+: https://plus.google.com/+Innov8social eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Fair Anita Quote Giveaway Announcement! Remember that we’re still giving away a pair of earrings from Fair Anita. The giveaway ends February 15, 2016. Click here for details.


041, Joy McBrien, Fair Anita | Beautiful Products with a Powerful Purpose
Feb 05 2016 33 mins  
After experiencing sexual violence in high school, Joy McBrien decided that she wanted to prevent this tragedy from happening to other women. When she read about the high incidence of violence against women in Peru, so she decided to travel there. As an 18 year-old, she decided to start a non-profit. After working with local women, she raised funds and built a women’s shelter. Over the next six years, Joy visited 18 countries, listening closely to the needs of women. Through these conversations, Joy began to deeply understand the relationship between poverty and violence against women. She understood that the best path to empowerment was through economic development. In other words, jobs. Today, Joy is the founder of Fair Anita, a social enterprise that empowers women around the world through dignified jobs and fair trade relationships. Fair Anita currently works with 8,000 women in 16 countries. Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Joy McBrien: “I wanted to create a systems-changing solution that would attack sexual violence at its source.” “I don’t want to have to ever sell something based off of pity. That’s not creating an empathetic relationship between artisan and consumer.” “We’re creating products that millennials in the US want, at a price point that they’re willing to pay. Therefore we’ve created jobs for thousands of women around the world. And because they have this job, they can leave an abusive partner, or they are seen as having more worth in their own home. They are empowered.” “With millennials, you have to be authentic and transparent and engage them in the process.” Fair Anita Quote Giveaway Announcement! If you love what you hear from Joy McBrien and want to support Fair Anita, you can join our giveaway. Click here for details. Social Entrepreneurship Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Fair Anita: http://www.fairanita.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ShopFairAnita Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fair.anita Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/fairanita Twitter: https://twitter.com/fair_anita

040, Chris Ategeka, Rides for Lives | A Life of Purpose
Feb 03 2016 50 mins  
Social Entrepreneurship can come from almost anywhere. Sometimes we hear stories of people in a position of privilege to use their resources to do good for the world. Chris Ategeka’s story does not start like that. Chris lost both parents to HIV / AIDS as a child in Uganda. Later he understood that, if his parents would have had access to simple healthcare and the required medicine, they could have lived to be a ripe old age. At the age of 7 Chris became the head of a household. He was responsible for caring for his younger siblings. At one point, one of his little brothers passed away because he could not make it to the hospital fast enough. Chris eventually made his way to an orphanage where he was matched with a sponsor in the United States. They provided assistance so that Chris was able to attend high school. He was a good student and eventually his sponsors offered him an opportunity to come to Berkley, where he studied engineering. But Chris experiences with the broken healthcare system caused him to want to return to his native Uganda. He wanted to be able to close the gap between patients and care. He first experimented with motorized bicycles, but the bicycles could not hold up under the tough east African road conditions. He tried building bicycles, but soon learned that he could buy whole bicycles from China cheaper than he could build one. Chris eventually started Rides for Lives, a company that builds innovative vehicles to bring healthcare to individuals in east Africa. They utilize micro entrepreneurs to deliver healthcare through their village ambulances and mobile clinics. Village ambulance drivers can quickly transport villagers to hospitals. The mobile clinics can see 150 – 200 people per day per unit. In this conversation Chris tells us his story, including his time as an Echoing Green fellow. He describes in detail his Echoing Green experience. Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Rides for Lives: http://www.ridesforlives.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ridesforlives Twitter: https://twitter.com/ridesforlives Chris Ategeka on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopherategeka Chris Ategeka on Twitter: https://twitter.com/chrisategeka

039, Olivia Rothschild, 109World | Inspire, Influence, Engage, Change the World
Feb 01 2016 32 mins  
Social Entrepreneur Olivia Rothschild always wanted to be of service. Growing up in multiple countries and traveling widely, she learned to be open-minded and curious. She said yes to opportunities that were presented to her. You can see these traits in her work today as a co-founder of 109World, a platform for positive change. 109World is built on 7 passions: water, children, the environment, education, women, food and animals. These passions are interconnected. In a time when trust in institutions is at an all-time low, Olivia, along with Rachel Brathen, known on Instagram as @yoga_girl, have a formula for success. Show up as your authentic self. Follow your passions. Live a transparent life, shared on social media. Inspire others, attracting a tribe. Use your influence to do good. Create shared-value projects that you can do together. Change the world. 109World is inspiring others to share in their passions through project-based trips. For example, in April they are traveling to Nicaragua to build a water distribution system. Key quotes from the interview: “I don’t think I ever took the decision of going where I am now. It’s just that I took opportunities that came along.” “I saw her development and her Instagram booming and her followers inspired every day by her words and her acts – and making changes in their lives.” “Creating shared value: for me it’s about looking at what you have and using that to do good. And what does Rachel have? She’s got this amazing influence. And she inspires people. So, what can we do with that? She does yoga. What can we do with that? She has Instagram. What can we do with that? It’s about looking at what we already have, and putting that together.” “I think our generation really needs a purpose to everything. And when we get that, that’s when we reach happiness. That’s where we feel wellbeing.” “Imagine if people can go somewhere for their own wellbeing but at the same time contribute to others.” “The ideas mostly came while we were out walking the dogs. That’s where the good stuff really came about.” “Instagram is our core way of communicating. That’s how we get people engaged, by showing what we’re doing. I think social media, especially Instagram, lets people be transparent. That’s what we aim to do. We aim to have a complete open dialog with people.” “You have to remind yourself constantly, where was I going when this problem arose? Just get back to that. “ “Surround yourself with people you like, that you share values with. That will help you trust, and trust will get you everywhere.” Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books 109World: https://www.109world.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/109world/ Olivia on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/orothschild Rachel (@yoga_girl) on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/yoga_girl/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/109world Twitter: https://twitter.com/109tweets Harvard Business Review article by Michael Porter on Shared Value: https://hbr.org/2011/01/the-big-idea-creating-shared-value

038, Elise Maxwell, Ova Woman | A Talk With Your Lady Friend About Women’s Intimate Health
Jan 29 2016 33 mins  
If you hang around the startup community long enough, you’re going to run into some founders that make you think “I don’t know what business they’re starting, but I want to back their play.” Elise Maxwell is one of those people. She is authentic, transparent and relentlessly helpful. She’s just someone you want to cheer for. Elise spends her days talking about women’s intimate health. What is women’s intimate health? Elise Maxwell told me, “It’s all the things that you might not be comfortable talking about. That’s a good indicator. Is this intimate health? Are you really talking about this right now? No? Then it’s probably intimate health.” Who do you trust to talk to about your intimate health questions and concerns? If you had a question about menstruation, breastfeeding, menopause, douching, or other intimate health questions, where would you go? You may go to your mother or other close female relative. You might go to your doctor. Or, you might have a best friend in whom you could confide. But not all women have that kind of relationship. Ova Woman is an online community. They create a safe space for talking about women’s intimate health. They also curate innovative products for women’s intimate health. Their goal is to be the lady friend to whom women can turn as they navigate periods, pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause. They also produce content such as a blog, podcast and vlog that tackles the taboos around women’s intimate health. While what the Ova Woman community talks about are important topics, they deliver their perspective with a dose of good humor. Their podcast is called The Speculum and they call their newsletter a periodical. See what they did there? Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Ova Woman: http://ovawoman.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/OvaWoman Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ovawoman Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ovawoman The Speculum Podcast on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-speculum-podcast/id1059930121?mt=2 The Speculum on Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/ovawoman

037, Dana Frasz, FoodShift | Reduce Food Waste, Feed People and Create Jobs
Jan 27 2016 34 mins  
After returning from time volunteering in Mother Teresa’s mission in Thailand, Dana Frasz was shocked to see the amount of food being wasted on her college campus. She founded Empty Bellies, an award-winning system to fight waste and hunger. They collected leftover food from local businesses, campuses and events and donated the food to soup kitchens and communities in need. After graduation, she spent three years at Ashoka, the world’s largest network of social entrepreneurs. Eventually, she made her way to the Bay area, where she founded FoodShift. FoodShift is a social enterprise based in Oakland. Their goal is to reduce wasted food while alleviating hunger. FoodShift is attacking the problem on several fronts. They are buying imperfect produce that would otherwise go to waste, from local farmers. That keeps food waste out of landfills, reducing the greenhouse gasses in the process. They are opening the Alameda Kitchen to turn the food into meals, and in the process, creating jobs for some people who have had some bad breaks along the way. And, they are distributing prepared meals into areas where healthy food is hard to come by, places that are often referred to as food deserts. So, in the process, they reduce food waste, reduce greenhouse gasses, feed hungry people and create jobs. Key quotes from the interview: “We’re in a situation where 40% of all food produced is wasted, while 49 million Americans don’t have adequate access to food.” “Hunger alleviation programs in the US cost $168 billion.” “If food waste was a country, it would be the third highest greenhouse gas emitter on the planet, behind the United States and China.” “There’s a direct correlation between food waste and climate change.” Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books FoodShift: http://foodshift.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/foodshift Twitter: https://twitter.com/FoodShift Dana Frasz on Twitter: https://twitter.com/danafrasz


036, Teju Ravilochan Unreasonable Institute | Providing Entrepreneurs What They Need to Scale Impact
Jan 25 2016 36 mins  
In many ways Teju Ravilochan’s story is the story of many immigrant families. His parents were born in India, but he was born in the United States. His parents learned how to adapt to their new culture through their own experience but also through the experiences of their children. Teju also learned about the world through the eyes of his parents. It was on a trip to India as a young man when a person Teju saw someone around his age who was begging for money. He was confronted with the sad reality of the “birth lottery,” the fact that the circumstances in which a person is born can influence the economic opportunities available to him or her. To Teju, that seemed unfair. And yet, trying to take on global poverty almost felt like an impossible task. He wondered if there weren’t a place where people could learn to tackle tough social and environmental challenges. This thought was the seed from which the Unreasonable Institute was born. The Unreasonable Institute is a mentorship and training program for entrepreneurs who are tackling social and environmental problems. Several times a year, at several global locations, Unreasonable brings about two dozen social entrepreneurs to a single living space, where they provide them with over 50 world-class mentors and about as many funders and investors. Unreasonable provides the knowledge, tools and resources that help social entrepreneurs to start quickly and scale their impact. They have locations in east Africa and Mexico. They also offer Unreasonable Labs, a 5-day experience. Their vision is to create 100 Unreasonable Institutes in 100 countries. What are the results? Well, the first 150 mentors that they worked with have raised over $90 million in funding and have impacted more than 8 million lives. Key quotes from the interview: “That felt so sad to me. The world is unequal by virtue of luck. And the people who can help don’t help because it seems impossible to solve that problem.” “My education was relatively abstract. It was focused on the problems. It wasn’t focused on what we could do about them.” “We were exposed to approaches that were ineffective because they were treating poor people like victims.” “Some of the approaches we saw that were advancing populations forward were treating poor people, not as victims, but as people who could solve their own problems.” “Last year we reached 158 startups, which were equivalent to the number of startups we reached in all the previous years that we’ve been in operation.” “I believe that there are two primary forces that really change the world. One of them is experimentation. The other is the organization of people.” “We look for ventures that create what we call profound impact.” “I would encourage everybody to formulate an 8-word mission statement which consists of a verb, a target population and an outcome.” “Our mission is, get entrepreneurs what they need to scale impact.” Resources: Unreasonable Institute: http://unreasonableinstitute.org Unreasonable East Africa: http://unreasonableeastafrica.org Unreasonable Mexico: http://unreasonablemexico.org Unreasonable Labs: http://unreasonablelabs.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/beunreasonable Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unreasonableinstitute LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-unreasonable-institute eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books

035, Laura Roeder, MeetEdgar.com | Authentic Kindness as a Business Differentiator
Jan 22 2016 31 mins  
If I told you about a startup that reached $1 million in recurring annual revenue, in 11 months, would you be interested in learn more? What if I told you that the founder had bootstrapped her way to success, would be even more interested? I know I was. Laura started as a freelance web and print designer, which led to gigs in social media marketing consulting, followed by social media marketing training. She is well known for launching B-School with Marie Forleo. Today, Laura is the Founder of MeetEdgar.com, a social media scheduling and automation software. Edgar allows you to upload your social media updates, categorize the updates, and then schedule them. Even better, it keeps great social media updates from going to waste. They allow you to reuse good social media updates over time. It was also interesting to hear how she thought about blogging, search engine optimization and social media and how they go together. Key quotes from the interview: “What’s great about online training is it is very scalable and it is easy to get into.” “We have three core values at our company and the first is Choose Kindness.” “Choose Kindness. When interacting with customers, we always give the benefit of doubt and choose the most optimistic approach and choose the most optimistic approach to their situation. This is especially important when someone is tempting us not to be kind. We find that life is better when we choose the high road. Choose kindness when interacting with other businesses in our space. We don’t badmouth our competition. We recognize that there is a huge difference between communicating Edgar’s value in relation to our competitors, and trash talking. We choose kindness when working with each other. We leave our egos out of it. We’re all working towards the same end goal.” “Getting the right mix is important for doing social media really, really well.” “We have come across a lot of people who say ‘I’ve been waiting for someone to build this tool!’” “Blogging, social media and SEO, I’d put them in the same bucket because all of those things help and interact with each other.” “Pound for pound, search is where we get the most new leads and customers.” “If you’ve ever signed on to Twitter, you know how it works. It’s like there is a parade going by. You stop and watch the parade for a minute. You see that section that went by while you were there and then you walk away.” “If you don’t send your tweet during the five minutes they were logged on, then they don’t see it. That’s why about 10% of the people who follow you ever see your post.” “People get nervous about reposting their content, but you have to remember that YOU see everything you post.” “If someone sees the message again, maybe they wanted to read it the first time, and they didn’t. Maybe they read it and loved it, and now they’re going to share it. Maybe they were not interested and they’re still not interested and that’s fine.” “You have to remember that social media is all opt-in.” “But just thinking about it week after week is not going to give you any new information. You’re not going to wake up tomorrow and know what will happen. We can never know how anything will turn out.” “All you can do is, start putting things into action, and then see. That’s how you really make progress in your business.” Resources: com: http://meetedgar.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/MeetEdgar Laura Roeder on Twitter: https://twitter.com/lkr Meet Edgar on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MeetEdgar Laura Roeder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LKRsocialmedia eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Mari Forleo B-School: http://marieforleobschool.com

034, Russ Stoddard, Oliver Russell | How to Build a Purpose-Driven Company
Jan 20 2016 25 mins  
Purpose matters. 90% of U.S. consumers say they would switch brands to one associated with a cause, given comparable price and quality, according to a study conducted by Cone Communications. In another study conducted by World Federation of Advertisers and Edelman, 60% of people said that they are actively seeking brands with a sense of purpose. And, according to Deloitte’s 2015 Millennial Survey, six out of 10 Millennials said a sense of purpose is part of the reason they chose to work for their current employer. Russ Stoddard of Oliver Russell builds brands for purpose-driven companies. He’s been at this for 25 years and so he’s learned quite a bit about the intersection of purpose and branding. And his understanding continues to evolve. Oliver Russell is a certified BCorporation and the first public benefit corporation in Idaho. Russ came to my attention in 2015 when he published three very useful white papers on “How to Build a Purpose-Driven Company.” You can find them here: http://bit.ly/PurposeWP Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Oliver Russell: http://www.oliverrussell.com White Papers: http://bit.ly/PurposeWP Twitter: https://twitter.com/Oliver_Russell LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/575940 Benefit Corporations: http://www.bcorporation.net

033, Cathy Clark, CASE i3 Initiative on Impact Investing | Leading at the Intersection of Ideas, Organizations and Capital
Jan 18 2016 39 mins  
Cathy Clark first came to my attention as the coauthor of the book The Impact Investor: Lessons in Leadership and Strategy for Collaborative Capitalism. However, as she tells me in this interview, she had an early start to social entrepreneurship. Cathy grew up in inner city Philadelphia. While still a high-school student, she helped her father create a program that prepared students for college. Through this experience, she learned that social outcome is the result of a well-run organization. Through her career she has had stops at the Aspen Institute, Markle Foundation, Flatiron Partners, Columbia University and the Investor’s Circle, to name a few. Today, Cathy is the Director of the CASE Initiative on Impact Investing (or i3) at Duke University. The mission of CASE i3 is to build the field and market of impact investing so that it can support the needs of social entrepreneurs and investors. Key quotes from the interview: “To get to a social outcome…you have to know how to run an organization.” “It wasn’t enough to have a good idea to want to help people, but you had to have an organization to do it and eventually that organization needed capital. And that has become the theme of my career.” “The Millennial generation has a different outlook on what their purpose is, and how they want their work lives to intersect with purpose.” “Founders alone don’t create good organizations. Founders need teams with a whole bunch of different skills and we happen to teach a lot of those skills.” “We completely believe that mindset needs to be inside of government, inside the private sector, inside the biggest corporations, and not just the smallest ones for change to actually happen.” “Part of starting something is, you have to be enraptured with the idea to the point of a little bit of insanity, so that you can push it through.” “When you work with organizations that are a little farther along, whether you call them mid-stage or growth stage or scaling stage, it turns out that you need a whole other basket of skills.” “Often enterprises need to either become part of a larger company or they need to they need to be adopted by government or they need to convince government to change the rules so that what they’re doing can spread.” “When is the right time to open your kimono and share what you are doing, and what are the norms for that and how are they different across the different sectors?” “Really know the kind of capital and the kind of capital partner that is right for you.” “Entrepreneurship is a community sport.” Resources: Book: The Impact Investor: Lessons in Leadership and Strategy for Collaborative Capitalism: http://amzn.to/1Sj92oq Book: Collaborative Capitalism and the Rise of Impact Investing: http://amzn.to/1PspBbx CASE i3, Initiative on Impact Investing: http://sites.duke.edu/casei3/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/cathyhc Book: Forces for Good: The Six Practices of High-Impact Nonprofits: http://amzn.to/1SWwAyT Stanford Social Innovation Review article, “The Power of Lean Data”, Winter, 2016: http://ssir.org/articles/entry/the_power_of_lean_data eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books



031, Curt Bowen, Semilla Nueva | Iterating Your Way to Success
Jan 13 2016 43 mins  
There’s an old saying that has been attributed at different times to Winston Churchill and Abraham Lincoln (neither of whom said it. “Success is going from failure to failure without losing momentum.” For any entrepreneur, especially social entrepreneurs, the ability to balance tenacity with humility is key. An entrepreneur listens carefully, designs a minimally viable product, tests it in the marketplace, pivots and then starts again. In this way, we learn quickly and make progress. No one has illustrated this principle better than Curt Bowen. In this interview you’ll hear Curt tell the story of several iterations of Semilla Nueva. They are working on the problem of malnutrition in Guatemala, which has the fourth highest rate of malnutrition in the world. Key quotes from the interview: “There’s this really beautiful relationship between tenacity, humility and instinct. You have to have all three of those pieces working together. Because all three of them are what is necessary for you to go from mistake to mistake to mistake to kind-of something starting to work to it really starting to work.” “You try something with all of your passion and all of your energy, and you totally fail. You pick yourself up and you have to really soul search.” “You have to be able to accept failure. Failure is absolutely required.” “We kept telling the farmers, ‘No, that’s not our job.’ Finally, after getting pushed towards it by the international experts, and pushed towards it by the government, and pushed towards it by the farmers, we thought, ‘Well, shoot. Maybe we have to be the ones who do this.’” “One of the things that I’ve done wrong in the past is, I’ve tried answering all of the questions before starting.” Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Semilla Nueva: http://semillanueva.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Semillanueva Twitter: https://twitter.com/semillanueva Curt Bowen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CurtPBowen Book: Good to Great: http://amzn.to/1mT4g3G Information on Biofortification: http://www.who.int/elena/titles/biofortification/en/

030, Jeffrey Hollender, Sustain Natural | A Systems Thinking Approach to Greater Good
Jan 11 2016 36 mins  
If Jeffrey Hollender’s name is familiar to you, it should not be surprising. As the cofounder of Seventh Generation, the author of a half dozen books, and a frequent speaker on using business to do good in the world, he’s a natural fit for a conversation with Social Entrepreneur. But he did not come on the podcast to talk about his past accomplishments. He’s busy taking a systemic approach to his latest business Sustain Natural. Through Sustain, Jeffrey is connecting the dots between condoms, hunger, health care, poverty, and climate change. Yes, that’s right. I said condoms…and lubricants and wipes. All of which are fair trade, organic and sustainably produced. And, Sustain donates 10% of their profits to help poorer women access health care such as STD testing and breast examinations. In this interview, Jeffrey talks about the importance of systems thinking in order to take on some of our most pressing problems. He describes the experience of being forced out of the company that he had built and he gives solid advice from his lessons learned. Key quotes from the interview: “Much of what we consider natural, sustainable products, are less bad rather than good.” “My insight is that we need to move to what I call net-positive businesses: businesses that are providing a net positive effect on the planet.” “If you were going to hire an employee, you would ask the employee for three references and you call up these people and you ask them what it was like to have this person working for you. Well, we don’t do that when it comes to investors.” “If we taught first grade children systems thinking, so that they could anticipate the unintended consequences of their actions, that might the most important thing we could do to create a more just, equitable and happy world.” “It is not easy to be an entrepreneur. You will run across no shortage of challenges and roadblocks. And it is really, really, really important that you choose to do something that you are deeply passionate and committed to. Otherwise there are too many reasons for you to walk away and give up.” “You really have to think, does this business idea help you become the person you want to be?” Books by Jeffrey Hollender: The Responsibility Revolution: How the Next Generation of Businesses Will Win: http://amzn.to/1ReaOXV Planet Home: Conscious Choices for Cleaning and Greening the World You Care About Most: http://amzn.to/1PjwsUq How to Make the World a Better Place: A Guide to Doing Good: http://amzn.to/1PjxlMM How to Make the World a Better Place: 116 Ways You Can Make a Difference: http://amzn.to/1Reb4WK Naturally Clean: The Seventh Generation Guide to Safe and Healthy, Non-Toxic Cleaning: http://amzn.to/1PjwP1j What Matters Most: How a Small Group of Pioneers Is Teaching Social Responsibility to Big Business, and Why Big Business is Listening: http://amzn.to/1PjwYSC In Our Every Deliberation: An Introduction to Seventh Generation: http://amzn.to/1Pjx64z Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Jeffrey Hollender: http://www.jeffreyhollender.com Sustain: http://sustainnatural.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/sustain_natural Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sustainnatural Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sustain_natural/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/sustaincondoms/ The American Sustainable Business Council: http://asbcouncil.org/

029, Mariana Costa, Laboratoria | The Power of Code to Change the Lives of Girls
Jan 08 2016 42 mins  
When Mariana Costa and her partners started a web development company in Lima, Peru, she quickly learned that good web developers are hard to come by. She also noticed that, of the candidates that applied for her open positions, very few of them were women. And, while there was a very high demand for web developers, there were also millions of young people who neither went to school nor worked, and of those, 70% were women. That means that, in Peru alone, there are nearly two million young women who are out of the workforce. Many of them turn to the informal economy to make a living. With customers hungry for help, a web design studio in need of talent, and a huge supply of underemployed or unemployed women, Mariana and her partners formed Laboratoria. Laboratoria, a tech social enterprise that empowers young women by giving them access to education and work in the digital sector. They accomplish this through their codeAcademy, a five-month program that emphasizes not just coding skills but also life skills. More than 60% of their graduates find meaningful work at more than two and a half their earning power prior to codeAcademy. Graduates pay-back the cost of the course during their first three years of employment. Laboratoria now has a presence in Peru, Mexico and Chile. Key quotes from the interview: “Programs that focus on poor people, unfortunately, often give them poor skills. It’s like ‘Yeah, because you’re poor, I’m going to teach you how to sew.’ I mean, it’s great, but that’s not going to change your future.” “There’s a lot of prejudice. ‘Will they be able to code? They went to a terrible public high school.’ And we’ve been able to prove, of course they are able to code!” “I think being a social entrepreneur is the coolest thing ever.” “It’s a privilege to dedicate your life to something that is yours and creates so much value for others. But it’s a lot of hard work.” “You have to be prepared to work hard and to hold on. The social mission helps you to hold on.” Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Laboratoria: http://laboratoria.la/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laboratoria.la Twitter: https://twitter.com/LaboratoriaLA YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClhhbCO2gmGZGwzSnQF8gew Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/105993422308000379519

028, Marina Kim, Ashoka U | Every Campus a Changemaker
Jan 06 2016 56 mins  
Colleges and Universities are complex organizations with lots of deep thinkers and multiple stakeholders. Marina Kim has had a lot of practice at working across complex cultural boundaries. The daughter of Korean and American parents, raised by a single mother, summers in Costa Rica, moved to northern England at 10 years old, and then attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. Today, Marina is the cofounder of Ashoka U, where they take an institutional change approach to impact the education of millions of students. Ashoka U has three primary programs: They have a Changemaker Campus designation where, through a rigorous 1-2 year selection process, they recognize colleges and universities that have embedded social innovation as a core value. There is the Ashoka U Commons, where cohorts of institutions work together on specific building blocks of social innovation education. They hold an annual conference called the Ashoka U Exchange. Key quotes from the interview: “I feel extremely comfortable adapting to new contexts, new cultures and environments.” “I feel right at home in many different places in the world.” “Millennials are dedicated to success, but the metrics are different.” “Millennials have a lower threshold for work that does not mean anything to them.” “Ashoka has shifted its mission to create a world where everyone can be a changemaker.” “A lot of energy and a lot of fearlessness in the early days.” “We believe that colleges and universities should be the place where people can find their potential to be a changemaker.” “If you have the identity of a changemaker, you’ll take that with you for the rest of your life.” “Lead with your super skill.” “Are you better suited to be an entrepreneur or an intrepreneur?” “She would model it, she would coach us, we would do it and then debrief.” “Give yourself time. If you want to make big social impact…it takes time.” Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Ashoka: http://ashoka.org AshokaU: http://ashokau.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/AshokaU Marina Kim on Twitter: https://twitter.com/marinakim

027, Tim Fargo, Tweet Jukebox| Lessons on Starting Your Business
Jan 04 2016 31 mins  
Tim Fargo might know a little something about attracting, converting and retaining new customers. He grew Omega Insurance Services from a three person operation in an extra bedroom to over 300 employees and with revenues in excess of $20 million. After selling Omega, Tim tried his hand at several businesses, some of which were not successful. Tim is the author of the best seller, Alphabet Success, an investor in numerous businesses, and an active adviser to several start-up firms. Today he is the founder of Tweet Jukebox, a software as a service (SaaS) content management system for your Twitter account. Tim launched Tweet Jukebox with only a freemium model. He initially built a user base of around 24,000 people. When he launched the paid model, he converted around 3% of his freemium customers to paying customers, which is an amazing conversion rate. In this interview with Social Entrepreneur, Tim talks about the bad, the good and the great of starting up a business and attracting your first customers. Key quotes from the interview: “Being early isn’t always the advantage people think it is.” “Just because there are other competitors in a space, don’t shy away from it. That means that there are people who buy whatever that is.” “I encourage people to stay close to their work when they’re launching something and not to build a cast of thousands.” “The way you make the most awesome helpdesk is to keep changing your product so that you don’t need one.” “Having people watch a two-minute video does a much more robust job of explaining.” “When you’re getting started, the real mandate is: sell it, ship it and get paid. If you can do those three things, you’re in business.” “Success is like sausage. You’d be surprised what goes into it.” Resources: Book: Alphabet Success: Keeping it Simple - My Secrets to Success: http://amzn.to/1IJDaGM Tweet Jukebox: http://www.tweetjukebox.com Tim Fargo on Twitter: https://twitter.com/alphabetsuccess Also Mentioned in this Episode: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books


026, Joseph Sanberg, Aspiration | Building Trust by Doing Good
Jan 01 2016 40 mins  
Confidence in many institutions has been falling – Congress, churches, and, financial institutions. More than 90% of Americans surveyed do not trust the Financial Services industry to have their best interests in mind. And, it’s no wonder. When I say Financial Services, what images come to mind? For many people, they think of scenes from the financial crisis that began in 2008. They can see massive layoffs, failing businesses and millions of foreclosed homes. What they don’t picture is, financial institutions reaping the consequences of their misbehavior. There were no Bernie Madoff-style perp walks or massive fines. Barclay’s bought Lehman Brothers. Bank of America bought Merrill Lynch. Wells Fargo took Wachovia. And the band played on. For many investors, the game seems rigged to serve a small number of financially affluent people. In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, you’ll meet Joe Sanberg. When Joe was nearing graduation from high school, the bank foreclosed on the mortgage of his parents’ home. The home that Joe grew up in was suddenly no longer theirs. But Joe was one of the lucky ones. He was exceptionally bright and was able to get into Harvard University. Just over a year ago, Joe and his partner, Andrei Cherny launched Aspiration, a new kind of financial institution. Here are a few ways in which Aspiration is different: You can choose to “pay what is fair” where you choose the fee. Fees are voluntary. Aspiration offers a checking account that pays 1% interest that has no service fees and no ATM fees. Money Magazine named it the best checking account. Aspiration offers a mutual fund, Aspiration Flagship Fund with a $500 minimum buy-in. You can also take your money out of any of Aspiration’s funds on any day without penalty. The Flagship Fund is structured to reduce volatility, making it a comfortable investment for more middle class and younger investors. They also offer Aspiration Redwood Fund, which is a way for young and middle class investors to access sustainable, impact investing. The Redwood Fund negatively screens out companies that go against the sustainability goals of the fund, such as fossil fuel companies and weapons manufacturers. It also positively screens companies that adhere to the recommendations of the Sustainable Accounting Standards Board. And, on top of all of that, Aspiration donates 10% of their revenues to charity. Keep in mind that, building a financial services company requires a massive amount of working capital, in a complex, competitive and highly regulated industry. So, this is no easy task. How is Aspiration doing? Well, they are doubling the number of customers about every six weeks. Resources: eBook: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Try Audible and Receive Two Free Audiobooks: http://tonyloyd.com/books Aspiration: https://www.aspiration.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Aspiration Joe Sanberg on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JosephNSanberg Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AspirationInvestments Also Mentioned in this Episode: Book: Too Big to Fail: http://amzn.to/1OkBWlD Sustainable Accounting Standards Board: http://www.sasb.org Disclaimer: PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RETURNS. There is no guarantee that any investment product will achieve its objectives, generate profits, or avoid losses. Investing involves risk of loss and alternative investments may not be suitable for everyone. Before investing, consider your investment objectives.

025, David Reiling, Sunrise Banks | Empowering Underserved Communities
Dec 30 2015 32 mins  
According to Sunrise Banks’ CEO David Reiling, “The culture of Sunrise Banks is all about mission and innovation.” If you pull his statement apart, you’ll notice three components: culture, mission and innovation. These are the magic ingredients that have allowed Sunrise Banks to be recognized as “Best for the World” company. Sunrise Banks has been recognized on many levels for their purpose-driven innovation. They are a certified Benefit Corporation (BCorp). Their parent company was one of the first Minnesota Public Benefit Corporations. And, they are a certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI), one of only 100 banks in the US. They focus on underserved communities. More than 60% of Sunrise Banks’ loans are in low to moderate income communities every year. On the other side of the equation, they provide a socially responsible deposit fund. They also have innovative programs for the unbanked and for people who traditionally would be trapped by predatory loan practices. Resources: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Sunrise Banks: https://www.sunrisebanks.com Sunrise Banks’ Socially Responsible Deposit Fund: https://www.sunrisebanks.com/srdf Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SunriseBanks Sunrise Banks on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SunriseBanks David Reiling on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReilingDavid YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/SunriseBanks LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/957063 Also Mentioned in this Episode: Benefit Corporations (BCorp and B-Lab): https://www.bcorporation.net Star Tribune article on Minnesota Public Benefit Corporations: http://www.startribune.com/public-benefit-corporations-a-new-option-for-minnesota-companies-that-do-good/291104881 Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_development_financial_institution Minnesota Keystone Program: http://www.minneapolischamber.org/pages/MinnesotaKeystone

024, Tanyella Evans, Library For All | Feeding Great Minds in Low-Income Countries
Dec 28 2015 54 mins  
Tanyella Evans grew up in the highlands of Scotland, which she describes as “the middle of nowhere.” At age 16 she received a scholarship to study at a United World College in Vancouver, BC, Canada. There she learned alongside two hundred students from eighty eight countries. At age 17, the United World College sponsored her on a one-year trip to Uganda as a volunteer teacher. There she saw the difference that an education can make to an eager mind. Globally, five of the six billion mobile phone subscribers live in the developing world. At the same time, 250 million children cannot read and write. Library for All is building a digital library to take advantage of mobile devices in order to overcome global illiteracy. They are currently working in Haiti, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo and Cambodia. Tanyella’s story is a story of serendipity, but also putting yourself in a serendipity-rich environment. It’s about community, but it’s also about building the community. It’s about moving developing countries along the path of development, but using technology to speed change while making the changes sustainable over time. Resources: Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Library for All: http://www.libraryforall.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/libraryforall.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/libraryforall Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/libraryforall Also Mentioned in this Episode: UWC International: http://www.uwc.org YES, Youth Empowerment Services: http://youthempowerment.us Campaign for Female Education: https://camfed.org Artists for Peace and Justice: http://www.apjnow.org Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story: https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story Hattian tablet manufacturer, surtab: http://surtab.com Techno Serve in Rwanda: http://www.technoserve.org/our-work/where-we-work/country/rwanda UNESCO Literacy Data: http://www.uis.unesco.org/literacy/Pages/default.aspx Knight Foundation: http://knightfoundation.org Bloomberg Philanthropies: http://www.bloomberg.org Luzerne Foundation: http://luzfdn.org English Family Foundation: http://www.englishfoundation.org.au The Asia Foundation: http://asiafoundation.org Hacking Kickstarter article by Tim Ferriss: http://fourhourworkweek.com/2012/12/18/hacking-kickstarter-how-to-raise-100000-in-10-days-includes-successful-templates-e-mails-etc/ Atlassian: https://www.atlassian.com

023, Shanil Samarakoon, Empower Projects| Empowerment as a Community Development Tool
Dec 25 2015 33 mins  
Early in the morning of December 26, 2004, an underwater earthquake sent a massive tsunamis along the countries bordering the Indian Ocean, killing 230,000 people in 14 countries. It was one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history. We have talked about this tsunami before, in episode 11 with Gayatri Datar of EarthEnable. In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, Shanil Samarakoon of Empower Projects relates his story of the same tsunami, but in this case, from the perspective of his native Sri Lanka where tens of thousands were killed. Empower Projects uses an asset-based community development approach. You may have heard this mentioned in the interview with Sasha Fisher of Spark MicroGrants. What is interesting about Empower Projects is that they make a five-year commitment to a community before they begin. This allows them to patiently work through the thorny issues of development. They train community facilitators who conduct a vision workshop, gathering the aspirations of the local community. They help the local villages to create inclusive leadership teams, including women. And they provide access to resources such as microfinance and sustainable technologies. In many cases, these villages are leapfrogging older technologies into the 21st century. Resources: Book: Building Communities from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets: http://amzn.to/1YBbhSR Book: The Abundant Community: Awakening the Power of Families and Neighborhoods: http://amzn.to/1NLDAcj Empower Projects: http://empowerprojects.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/empowerprojects Twitter: https://twitter.com/team_empower Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/empowerprojects Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+EmpowerprojectsOrg Five Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent

022, Sasha Fisher, Spark MicroGrants | Driving Change Through Empowerment
Dec 23 2015 32 mins  
Where were you on September 11, 2001? If you were more than three years old at the time, there’s a good chance that you remember. Sasha Fisher grew up about five blocks from “ground zero.” At the time, Sasha was in middle school. This event caused Sasha to begin to think outside of her neighborhood, her city and even her country. She began to learn about people around the world who could not meet their most fundamental basic needs. As a college student, Sasha had a chance to visit South Sudan where she observed a disturbing pattern. Outside aide organizations had started many projects which were not sustained after the aid agencies left. And, the local community was not empowered in the process. Sasha began to think that there had to be a better way. Spark MicroGrants has worked with 126 villages across four countries in east Africa. Spark supports rural poor communities to design, implement and manage their own social impact projects. They provide microgrants between $2,000 and $10,000 to enable project implementation, such as of a school, electricity line or farm. No interest or repayment of the funds granted is requested. Does it work? Spark MicroGrants see a 92% sustainability rate for their projects, which is unheard of in development projects. Also, after a community launches the initial project with the help of Spark MicroGrants, the local community launch a second project on their own, showing that they can sustain the process. 97% of the villages continue to stay organized after the initial grant process. Resources: Spark MicroGrants: http://www.sparkmicrogrants.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/SparkMG 5 Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent


021, Julian Maha, KultureCity | The Startup That is Changing the Perception of Autism
Dec 21 2015 44 mins  
Autism is the fastest growing developmental diagnosis. It is more often diagnosed in children than diabetes, HIV and cancer combined. About four years ago, Julian Maha and his wife received a diagnosis of autism for their son Abram. At the time, they were told that they would need to institutionalize their son. After a very brief period of shock and mourning from the news, the Maha family, both physicians and business people, made a decision that would change the course of their life, the life of their son and the lives of thousands of families who are dealing with Autism. They formed an organization, KultureCity. KultureCity has an aim of shifting how autism is perceived and how autistic individuals are treated in our society. They also have a mission to create a business model that allows them to sustain their impact over time through multiple revenue streams. In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, we discuss: The back story behind the foundation of KultureCity. Their goals and strategies. How KultureCity is changing the perception of people with autism. How KultureCity is generating revenues that sustain their impact. Resources: Book: Freaks, Geeks & Asperger Syndrome: A User Guide to Adolescence http://amzn.to/1QEYGi4 Book: Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences: http://amzn.to/1Mk5t9k KultureCity: http://kulturecity.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kulturecity Twitter: https://twitter.com/kulturec 5 Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent

020, Fred Rose, Acara | Helping Solve Hard and Complicated Problems Across Boundaries
Dec 18 2015 41 mins  
Fred Rose grew up on a family farm a few miles from the Canadian border. It was there that Fred learned several life lessons that make him a good entrepreneur: self-sufficiency, a lack of need for permission, perseverance. He was also a bit of an odd man out. Imagine the audacity of a kid in a one-room school house who dared to dream of growing up to be a scientist. Fred told me that he’s always had a bit of chip on his shoulder: a need to prove that he could do what others did not believe he could do. Fred went to work in Silicon Valley in 1979, just as personal computers were on the rise. After a few years, he moved to Minnesota to pursue his degree from the University of Minnesota, where his love for computers began to bloom. After graduation, he went to work for Honeywell where he had the chance to develop radiation-hardened computer chips for space flight. Today, some of his chips are in the Smithsonian Institute. Fred also worked on cutting edge projects including synthesis, where they describe hardware in the software and then compiling it directly to hardware. Through these experiences, Fred learned about the management of complexity. Fred also worked on research projects for the US Department of Defense, within Honeywell as a principal researcher for DARPA. There he learned how to write grant proposals and describe value propositions. In 1985, Fred and his wife had triplets who had serious medical complications. One of the triplets died, and the other two have cerebral palsy. When his daughters entered school in the early 1990s, he worked towards mainstreaming them. He was drawn into problem-based curriculum, where he found that he could use his skills. In the late 1990s, Fred started a non-profit, High Tech Kids, to get kids involved in science and technology. Around this same time, Fred got involved in Honeywell’s business internationally, especially in India. These two things combined, put Fred on his current path which is, according to Fred “Helping people and creating organizations, to help them solve hard and complicated problems, outside of boundaries.” Today, Fred is the co-founder and director of Acara, a program of the Institute on the Environment, at the University of Minnesota. Acara is a series of courses and incubation activities to turn the passion of students into viable social and environmental ventures. Resources: Book: The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty Through Profits: http://amzn.to/1RSQ0nH Acara: http://acara.environment.umn.edu/ Acara on Twitter: https://twitter.com/acaraimpact Fred Rose on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FredRoseAcara Institute on the Environment: http://environment.umn.edu/ High Tech Kids: http://hightechkids.org

019, Carrie Rich, Global Good Fund | The Surprising Power of Strangers to Do Good
Dec 16 2015 29 mins  
Every now and then, life surprises you. People, even complete strangers, have the capacity for kindness and goodness. They can sometimes surprise you in unexpected and wonderful ways. Carrie Rich had one of those experiences, and, in a smaller way, I had one of those experiences when Carrie told me her story. Of all of the interviews that I have done, this one caught me off guard more than any other. In fact, you will hear at one point in the interview, I told Carrie, “You could push me over with a feather.” In this episode of Social Entrepreneur, Carrie tells the story of the Global Good Fund and how it came to be, including the surprising power of strangers to do good in the world. The Global Good Fund identifies high potential leaders of social good organizations who are positioned for growth. They provide a proprietary 360 degree assessment, a fellowship program and ongoing mentorship. They are not an incubator or an accelerator. They are for leaders of social enterprises that are about two or more years in their journey, who need help to reach the next level. They focus on developing the individual leader in order to develop their individual capacity. The results speak for themselves. The companies they work with are going at three to ten times faster than would otherwise be expected. In this interview, Carrie shares how the Global Good Fund works, how they select their fellows, how they extend their offerings to people who cannot attend their program and where they are going next. Resources: Global Good Fund: http://www.globalgoodfund.org On Twitter: https://twitter.com/GlobalGoodFund Carrie Rich on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MsCarrieRich Carrie’s email address: [email protected] 5 Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent

018, Tom Dawkins, StartSomeGood | Building Platforms of Social Good
Dec 14 2015 62 mins  
Special Announcement for this week: Because of all of the people who have subscribed, rated and reviewed Social Entrepreneur, we are trending in the iTunes store. We are New & Noteworthy in the following categories: Business Podcasts: #10 Career Podcasts: #6 Marketing & Management Podcasts: #5 Government & Organization Podcasts: #1 Thank you, thank you, thank you to all who have subscribed, rated and reviewed Social Entrepreneur. As a thank you gift, I’d like to send you a special report, 5 Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs. To receive the report, you can text the word SOCENT to 44222. This only works if you are in the US or Canada. If you’re outside the US and Canada, you can still receive the report by going to http://tonyloyd.com/socent Today’s Episode: At age 16, Tom Dawkins was not fitting in. He attended an academically selective high school and was not performing well when compared to his peers. He scored 179 out of 180 students in math. He was being bullied at school and he was arguing with his parents. One day when he had been sent into the hallway for talking in class, he noticed a mud-stained brochure on the floor. Out of sheer boredom, he reached down and picked it up. The brochure was for a student exchange program to America. He ended up going to Spokane, Washington. While in the US, he was invited to attend an event called “State of the Union of the World.” This meeting was post cold-war. Guests included Ronald Regan, Margaret Thatcher, Mikhail Gorbachev, seven Nobel Peace Prize winners, environmental leaders, authors and business leaders. This meeting inspired Tom to set up a chapter of Junior State America in his high school in Spokane. When he returned to Australia, he realized that there was no equivalent organization, and so he and his younger sister set one up called Future Leaders of Australia. They set up events and brought in speakers. They created an equivalent organization in college. After a while, Tom began to realize that event-driven organizations had limits, but media-driven events had fewer limits. In 2000, he launched Vibewire, a youth-led not-for-profit organization dedicated to creating opportunities for younger Australians to express themselves creatively and politically. By 2008, Tom traveled to the US where he became the first social media director for Ashoka. It was at Ashoka that he learned about crowdfunding for social good. This led, eventually, to the establishment of StartSomeGood. StartSomeGood is the global crowdfunding platform for social entrepreneurs, nonprofits, changemakers and social good projects. When a project appears on StartSomeGood, it is surrounded by project from likeminded social innovators. Funders who visit StartSomeGood are likely looking for social impact projects to fund. StartSomeGood has some innovative approaches such as their “tipping point,” which allows projects to select two goals. They also have a process called CrowdMatch which allows foundations, governments and corporations to shift their grant giving and CSR initiatives into a match format. StartSomeGood pairs each project with a customer support person, providing a high level of personal touch. What are the results? 53% of the projects on StartSomeGood reach their goal, compared with 39% on Kickstarter and 9% on Indiegogo. Resources: 5 Key Traits of Successful Social Entrepreneurs: http://tonyloyd.com/socent Crowdfunding for Changemakers course on Udemy: http://bit.ly/Crwdfund StartSomeGood: https://startsomegood.com On Twitter: https://twitter.com/startsomegood On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StartSomeGood On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/StartSomeGood Tom Dawkins on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tomjd

017, Stefan Phang, Soap for Hope | Leveraging the Strength of a Corporation
Dec 11 2015 48 mins  
When you visit a hotel, do you ever wonder what happens to the small piece of soap you leave behind? The average hotel generates somewhere from three to six tons of solid soap waste per year. What if that soap could be diverted from the landfill and used to lift people out of extreme poverty and prevent sex trafficking? Well, that’s what Stefan Phang of Sealed Air’s Soap for Hope program is doing. Soap for Hope was piloted in Cambodia in October, 2013. By September 2015, they have partnered with 300 hotel properties in 19 countries. They have diverted 630 tons of solid soap waste from landfills. They converted this waste into 5.3 million bars of soap, which were given to 450,000 people. In the process, they have raised the livelihood of 600 people who were previously in extreme poverty. And, as a result, they have reduced the incidence of sex trafficking of children. Soap for Hope takes the soap waste from hotels, converts them into new soap products, and distributes the upcycled soaps to people who currently do not have access, which creating jobs for the economically disadvantaged. This is a win-win-win for Sealed Air, for the partner hotels and for the local communities. Stefan’s activities have allowed Sealed Air and their partner hotels to go beyond a set of written-down values, or words in a CSR report, and to make an impact on some of the most vulnerable people on earth. Stefan has been involved in child protection for more than twenty years, but not as the leader of an NGO, but as an outreach of his work as an employee of for-profit corporations. Stefan has seen firsthand the fallout from sex trafficking of children as young as 8 years old. Stefan began by working with organizations that rescue and reintegrate these abused children. However, the children had a difficult time reintegrating into society. So, Stefan began to focus more on preventing sex trafficking and protecting the children and families. Stefan first came to my attention because of something remarkable he did. He noticed that, in developing countries, one of the most common modes of transportation is the motorcycle. There are often multiple family members riding together, frequently with small children, and almost always without helmets. Stefan found a way to acquire and distribute motorcycle helmets, starting in Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia and India. In the first five years, he and the other participants in the program gave away 60,000 helmets. These helmets saved around 2,900 children from serious head injuries. Resources: Sealed Air Soap for Hope: http://sealedair.com/soap-hope Stefan Phang on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stefan.phang Stefan Phang on LinkedIn: https://sg.linkedin.com/in/stefan-phang-8a56a320 UNICEF’s Child protection page: http://www.unicef.org/protection


16, Funlayo Alabi, Shea Radiance | Women’s Gold
Dec 09 2015 56 mins  
You may have seen shea butter as an ingredient, especially in high-end beauty products. But did you know that in Africa, shea butter is called “women’s gold”? Funlayo Alabi and her husband share a common problem, dry skin. They have a son who had kidney problems, and he also had very dry skin. Their second son had a severe case of eczema. After trying several over the counter and prescription remedies, they found no relief. So, they thought back to their childhood in Nigeria and remembered their parents and grandparents using shea butter to remedy dry skin. Funlayo’s husband experimented with different formulations over a two-year period until they developed their first product. Eventually Funlayo and her husband traveled to Nigeria, where they partnered with women’s cooperatives, an NGO and the Nigerian government to create a supply chain of shea butter. Funlayo’s company, Shea Radiance, provided equipment and training. By the middle of 2012, Shea Radiance had acquired more than 12 metric tons of shea butter from these women. Funlayo’s small team was trying to do everything from sourcing to logistics to branding to sales & marketing. In 2012, Shea Radiance had a tremendous opportunity to sell their product in a big-box store in the US. They tried bootstrapping this opportunity, and did not have the right resources to weather a slow start in the retailer and to market the brand correctly. The retailer pulled back, severely impacting Funlayo’s business. At this point, Funlayo and her husband seriously considered quitting, except for two factors. They had a product that consumers loved and they had a group of women in Nigeria and Ghana depending on them to market shea butter. They knew that they could not quit. It was at this time that they met Jeff Cherry of the Conscious Venture Lab, an impact-company accelerator. In the Conscious Venture Lab, Funlayo was able to narrow their focus, improve their branding and find better ways to tell their story. Today, Shea Radiance continues to grow as a strong brand. They are using convertible debt to fund the company. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: The power of shea butter as community development tool The importance of supporting women The power of naivety The Business model canvas How Shea Radiance turned around their company after a severe setback Lessons learned Resources: Funlayo’s contact information: [email protected] Shae Radiance on the Web: http://shearadiance.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/545421 Twitter: https://twitter.com/SheaRadiance Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/shearadiance Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shearadiance/ From Rookie to Rockstar on Periscope: http://tonyloyd.com/periscope Conscious Venture Lab: http://www.consciousventurelab.com

015, Tonya Surman, Centre for Social Innovation | The Master Gardner
Dec 07 2015 47 mins  
Tonya Surman is a master gardener of social innovation. Tonya’s journey began when she was four years-old. Her mother left and her father became the sole parent. Tonya, her father and sister struggled with poverty. She says “My father raised us on love and not food.” She points to this experience as the source of her resilience, strength and a need to create an impact. At the age of 19, Tonya left University and traveled the world. While she was living in a small hut on the Andaman Sea in Thailand, news arrived that a nearby village had been devastated by a mud slide. The primary contributing factor was deforestation. This helped her to draw a direct correlation between the environment and social / economic issues. She has been responsible for the founding of over a dozen social enterprises. One of the social enterprises she created was the Canadian Partnership for Children's Health and Environment (CPCHE), where she brought together 11 different organizations. There, she saw the power of collaboration to create meaningful change. Today, she is the CEO of the Centre for Social Innovation (CSI), where they operate five spaces for early stage social-mission organizations. They have 165,000 square feet under management and they support and provide space to over 1,000 social-mission organizations. They have served of 2,700 organizations and more than 5,000 people. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: The community animation process used by CSI in order to reduce friction and foster collaboration. Tonya’s attitude of “I’m here to make social change and have fun doing it.” The experiences that led to the foundation of CSI. CSI’s journey to becoming more intentional and focused on specific, measurable impacts. Resources: Centre for Social Innovation on the web: http://socialinnovation.ca CSI Toronto on Twitter: https://twitter.com/csiTO CSI New York on Twitter: https://twitter.com/csiSL CSI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/centreforsocialinnovation Book: Make Space: How to Set the Stage for Creative Collaboration http://amzn.to/1m41zMK

014, Steele Lorenz, MyRain | Saving Water Resources through Business Innovation
Dec 04 2015 45 mins  
MyRain distributes efficient irrigation equipment to small plot farmers in India. It is not an innovation of technology; drip irrigation has existed and been a proven technology for many years. By using drip irrigation, you can increase crop yield by 50% to 100% and decrease water consumed between 20% and 50% when compared with flood irrigation. Increasing yields can drastically improve the quality of life for small plot farmers. Globally, 70% of fresh water is used for agricultural purposes. It has been estimated that by 2050 the world population will be around 9 billion. With the emerging global middle class, the demand for food will double. This places tremendous pressure on our fresh water resources. In the arid region of southern India where MyRain is working, the water tables are falling rapidly. This could reach a crisis level within 15 to 20 years. The problem the technology. Drip irrigation exists. The problem is distribution. This is where MyRain innovates. This year, the irrigation systems that they have distributed will save 5 billion liters of water. That’s about the amount of water that a good sized city will consume in a year…and they are just getting started. Born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, Steele Lorenz grew up enjoying sports. He says he liked games with clear, fixed rules. He participated in lots of extracurricular activities including tennis camp and piano lessons. It was a far cry from the conditions of rural Indian farmers. Steele attended the University of Minnesota with the intention of obtaining a JD degree and practicing law. Steele says “By accident, I ended up in an entrepreneurship course.” He participated in the Ventures Enterprise. His experience with entrepreneurship lit a fire inside of him. That is when he found the Acara Institute. At the time they were focused on for-profit social enterprises solving water-related issues in India. Steele participated in the Acara Challenge where his team came in second place. When the challenge ended, Steele and his partners graduated and they went on with their lives. But they were left with a business plan, and an awakened sense that they could make an impact. Steele could not escape from the idea. He and his partner Sri Latha kept testing the concept until there was nothing left to do but to either execute or forget it. Tried working with NGOs, but did not find them to move at the same pace as entrepreneurs. Next, moved to retailers already working with farmers, but there were three main problems to overcome. MyRain has taken on each in turn. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: How Steele caught the entrepreneurial bug. The Acara Challenge. The Story of MyRain. The challenges of water resource management in the face of feeding 9 billion people. The three challenges faced by MyRain and how they have addressed each one. How they are scaling MyRain in India. The challenges of measuring impact. Resources: MyRain on the web: http://myrainindia.com Acara Institute: http://acara.environment.umn.edu/ The Ventures Enterprise at the Carlson School of Management: http://carlsonschool.umn.edu/enterprise-programs/ventures-enterprise The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water: http://amzn.to/1TcsKQg Water: http://amzn.to/1Tctp4m

013, Jim Smith, MadiDrop | From Academic Researcher to Founder
Dec 02 2015 56 mins  
When I say “early stage entrepreneur,” whom do you picture? A hungry young person in a hoodie, eating Raman noodles and cranking out code? While this might be the prototype, more and more social entrepreneurs are looking more like Jim Smith. Jim is an academic and a scientist. He spends most days in deep research and in the classroom at the University of Virginia. However, thorough a series of synchronous events, Jim was jarred into the world of hands-on entrepreneurship in some of the most underserved communities of the world. Jim Smith is an advisor and serves on the board of PureMadi, where they developed a sustainable, ceramic water filter. They built a factory in South Africa where they engage local women potters. Therefore, not only are the water filters effective, but they create a revenue stream for women. Today Jim is the Cofounder and Chief Scientist at MadiDrop PBC (Public Benefit Corporation), bringing a safe drinking water solution to communities throughout the world. Growing up on Long Island, Jim enjoyed the typical suburban life. His father got up early in the morning and rode the Long Island Railroad into the city. However, when Jim was around 10 years old, his father lost his job. This incident drove Jim to look for a discipline that seemed to produce steady employment and security. His older brother was an engineer, and influenced his decision to focus on environmental and water resources engineering. Jim admits that his world views was primarily focused on the US and he was not really fully aware of the global challenges with clean water security. He became interested in remediating polluted water systems using natural soil microorganisms. He was primarily working on remediating industrial pollutants in groundwater and doing academic research when he received a call from Robert Marquez who was interested in using ceramics to purify water in developing countries. This work opened Jim’s eyes to difficulties with clean drinking water around the world. Around this same time, Jim began to develop a course for Princeton University on water supplies in refugee camps. This led to a course that is still taught by Jim today at the University of Virginia called “Water for the World.” It was from this course that PureMadi was born. Eventually, Jim saw that while PureMadi is a very good solution, one he continues to support, a second solution was required, one that was light weight, inexpensive and easily transported. The MadiDrop is a small ceramic tablet embedded with silver. It is inexpensive, small and durable. It can be easily shipped anywhere in the world. When placed in a household storage container and filled with water, the MadiDrop releases silver ions, disinfecting the water and making it safe to drink. Unlike the PureMadi water filter, the MadiDrop is produced in Charlottesville, Virginia. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: What is a public benefit company? Jim’s story of how he became a water resource engineer. How a set of serendipitous encounters changed the course of Jim’s life. What a trip to Guatemala taught him about how most of the world consumes water. PureMadi and how they empower women in rural villages to create water filtration systems and produce an income. How Jim ended up launching MadiDrop, a Public Benefit Corporation. Resources: MadiDrop web site: http://madidrop.com/ MadiDrop on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/madidrop MadiDrop on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MadiDrop MadiDrop on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/madidrop Benefit Corporations: https://www.bcorporation.net/ PureMadi: http://www.puremadi.org

012, Roger L. Martin, Rotman School | Changing the World One Model at a Time
Nov 30 2015 42 mins  
Roger L. Martin has spent his career attacking models that don’t produce the desired results. I first became aware of Roger L. Martin’s work when I was the Global Head of Learning & Development for Diversey, Inc. My CEO at the time, a former Proctor & Gamble executive, taught me Roger’s cascading choices framework as a method for setting and maintaining strategy. He had first learned it from A.G. Lafley, the CEO of P&G. Later, Roger Martin partnered with A.G. Lafley to write Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works. It is one of the books that I have most often recommended to others. With his deep expertise on strategic thinking, Roger has served on several boards, both for profit and non-profit. It was in his capacity as a board member for the Skoll Foundation that he began to think about the work of social entrepreneurs. Roger helped the Skoll Foundation to clearly define their audience and their mission. This led to the seminal article “Social Entrepreneurship: A Case for a Definition,” co-written with Sally Osberg, the CEO at Skoll. Eventually Sally and Roger expanded on these concepts and co-wrote Getting Beyond Better: How Social Entrepreneurship Works. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: How Roger came to be on the board of the Skoll Foundation. The difference between being a Director on the board of a commercial businesses vs. nonprofit boards. A definition of social entrepreneurship. Examples of social entrepreneurs. The difference between social entrepreneurs, social service providers and social advocates. The motivation of impact investors. Four stages of social entrepreneurship. Understand the world while balancing three tensions. Balance abhorrence and appreciation. The importance of balance between abhorring the status quo and appreciating why the status quo exists, and how it came to be. Balance apprenticeship and expertise. Balance experimentation and commitment. Envisage a dramatically better future which is a changed equilibrium. Build a model that makes the change happen. Scale the model. If I were going to predict the success of a social entrepreneur, I would ask them to explain why the current, unpleasant equilibrium exists. Understand the economics. Resources: Getting Beyond Better: How Social Entrepreneurship Works: http://amzn.to/1MXeydc Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works: http://amzn.to/1MXeTwt Opposable Mind: Winning Through Integrative Thinking: http://amzn.to/1MXftdD Roger L. Martin online: http://rogerlmartin.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RogerLMartin Social Entrepreneurship: A Case for a Definition: http://ssir.org/articles/entry/social_entrepreneurship_the_case_for_definition Rotman School of Management: https://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ Skoll Foundation: http://skoll.org/ Hospital for Sick Children: http://www.sickkids.ca/ Tennis Canada: http://www.tenniscanada.com/ Muhammad Yunus: http://muhammadyunus.org/ Rugmark: http://www.rugmarkindia.org/Rugmark/index.htm Molly Melching: http://www.tostan.org/ . Also see this YouTube: https://youtu.be/IHW_wVSemRY Fair Trade USA: http://fairtradeusa.org/ Bart Weetjens: https://www.apopo.org/en/ Marine Stewardship Counsel: https://www.msc.org/



010, Devin Thorpe, Champion of Social Good
Nov 25 2015 57 mins  
When Devin Thorpe was 11 years old, he volunteered to clean up in the aftermath of a flood that devastated an Idaho town. This experience left an impression on him and a craving to be of service to others. Over the years, Devin had held a number of positions, working in banking, financial planning and as a Chief Financial Officer. After Devin lost his job in 2011, he took the opportunity to move to China and to teach. While there, he wrote Your Mark On The World: Stories of service that show us how to give more with a purpose without giving up what's most important. This led to many opportunities including public speaking and writing for Forbes. Devin has an online show called Your Mark on the World, where he has conducted over 600 episodes. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: Devin’s early years and the power of starting over. The childhood incident that set his life’s course. Lessons learned from Polio eradication. Some of his favorite interviews with Social Entrepreneurs and what he has learned. Resources: Your Mark on the World: http://amzn.to/1H5nI6M Crowdfunding for Social Good: Financing Your Mark on the World: http://amzn.to/1NXJU43 925 Ideas to Help You Save Money, Get Out of Debt and Retire A Millionaire So You Can Leave Your Mark on the World: http://amzn.to/1H5o3q9 Devin on the Web: http://devinthorpe.com/ Devin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/devindthorpe Your Mark on the World web site: http://yourmarkontheworld.com/ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ymotwg/ Crowdfunding for Social Good: http://goodcrowd.info Article featuring Ubuntu: http://yourmarkontheworld.com/this-solution-to-poverty-in-slums-needs-to-be-rapidly-replicated

009, David Gluckman, Lumkani | Safety through Innovation
Nov 23 2015 47 mins  
David Gluckman’s career as an entrepreneur started when he was 8 years old and worked in a market booth in Johannesburg. But growing up in South Africa, he could not escape the obvious inequality of society. By the time he reached university in Cape Town, he became determined that he wanted to be part of changing the system. After a short career in banking and as a consultant for EY, David decided to take a break from corporate life and return to Cape Town. He stayed with his friend Emily Vining. As it happens, Emily was working with Francois Petousis and Samuel Ginsberg to start Lumkani. Lumkani manufactures low-cost fire detectors for the urban poor, starting in the urban slums of South Africa. Once a fire starts in one informal home, it quickly spreads, displacing tens of thousands of residents each year. Lumkani’s clever device alarms in a home. If the fire is not put out, the device sends a radio signal to all of the other homes within 40 meters. It also sends a text message to the home owner. This allows residents to react quickly, preventing the spread of fire. Not only is Lumkani using innovative technology in their devices, but they are also using an innovative business model to sell and distribute their devices. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: The impact of fire for the urban poor. The device that Lumkani has designed. The design criteria and how they developed it. The innovative business model that Lumkani uses to make this sophisticated device affordable to the urban poor. The value of reaching scale, especially when designing for extreme affordability. Resources: Lumkani on the web: http://lumkani.com/ Lumkani on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Lumkani On Twitter: https://twitter.com/LumkaniFire On YouTube: https://youtu.be/cR0vM3qGxT8

008, Pedro Domingos, Author of The Master Algorithm
Nov 20 2015 55 mins  
When Pedro Domingos was growing up in Lisbon, he loved to read and to learn. In fact, when he was 13 years old, he decided that he wanted to learn everything that there is to know. It did not take him long to decide that it might be a little more useful to, instead of knowing everything, to become deeply knowledgeable about a few topics. His university studies led him to computer science in the 1980s, just as personal computers were beginning to catch on. Today, Pedro is a professor at the University of Washington and the author of The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World. In this book he describes the five schools of thought on machine learning and advocates for a grand unifying theory. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: The benefit of deep expertise in one field of knowledge, when balanced with a broad interests in other fields. The exponential growth of computer processing power. The equally explosive growth of software. The power of algorithms, and how three words, “and, or, not” are changing our world. How machine learning is a technology that builds itself. How machine learning becomes culturally acceptable. Examples of disruptions brought about my machine learning. The surprising impact of machine learning on knowledge workers. How the combination of machine learning with robotics is brining machine learning into the physical world. The business impact of being able to lease machine learning or even find algorithms for free on GitHub. Where machine learning is going as a practice. Resources: The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World: http://amzn.to/1PJinUa Pedro Domingos on the web: http://pedrodomingos.org Pedro Domingos on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pmddomingos GitHub: https://github.com Give Well: http://www.givewell.org The Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab at MIT: http://www.povertyactionlab.org

007, Isabel Medem, X-Runner Venture | The Care and Feeding of a Social Enterprise
Nov 18 2015 42 mins  
In this interview leading to World Toilet Day on November 19, Isabel Medem talks about her work in hygienic sanitation in Lima, Peru. X-Runner Venture is a social enterprise that brings toilets to the residents of informal housing. Lima is the second driest capitals on earth. In the informal housing, many people resort to pit latrines which spread disease. Because the pit latrines are dug near the houses, they can cause the ground on which the houses are built to become unstable. Some people try to delay using the pit latrines, which can cause further health problems. After university, Isabel worked in microfinance in Africa. Later, when living in Berlin, she met her cofounder, Jessica Altenburger, who was working on hygienic sanitation. Eventually they moved to Lima where, today, their toilets are in about 400 households. In this episode of Social Entrepreneurs, Isabel compares the running of a social venture to the care and feeding of a child. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast, we discuss: The dangers of pit latrines. How Isabel met Jessie, her co-founder. How, together they designed a solution. How they introduced the solution to the residents of the urban slum near Lima. The holistic system that X-Runner Venture has created. The challenges of running a social enterprise. The importance of scaling the enterprise. The metrics they use to measure their success. Their creative use of mobile technology. The rewards of social entrepreneurship. Advice for new Social Entrepreneurs. Resources: World Toilet Day: http://www.worldtoiletday.info/ X-Runner Venture web site: http://xrunner-venture.com/ X-Runner’s Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/xrunner.venture X-Runner on Twitter: https://twitter.com/xrunners


006, David Auerbach, Sanergy | Behavior Change through Aspirational Branding
Nov 16 2015 40 mins  
November 19 is World Toilet Day. Why? Because globally, about 2.4 billion people, about one-third of the world’s population, do not have access to a basic toilet. Sanitation-related illnesses kill over a thousand children per day. This problem is compounded by the concentration of informal housing in urban setting. This week we are bringing you two stories of hygienic sanitation, starting with David Auerbach and Sanergy. David’s mother was a psychologist and social worker. His father was an economist. It seems to him, that he has always been thinking of social justice. When David was a teacher in rural China, he saw first-hand a lack of hygienic sanitation. In 2010, David and his cofounders participated in the Development Ventures class at MIT. The team quickly settled as hygienic sanitation (read that toilets) as the problem that they were going to tackle. In January 2011, they traveled to the urban slums near Nairobi, Kenya where they researched and confirmed their ideas. What they found when they arrived was pit latrines, not much more than a hole in the ground with some tin and wood tacked up for privacy. Otherwise, people would use what are euphemistically called “flying toilets,” which were simply plastic bags that are subsequently discarded in the roads and waterways. In fact, over 90% of the waste is never treated and ends up in the waterways, spreading disease. In 2011, the team started Sanergy, a social enterprise that is working to improve access to hygienic sanitation for residents of urban slums, starting in Nairobi, Kenya. Sanergy built and launched their first toilet on World Toilet Day in 2011. Sanergy has developed an aspirational brand, Fresh Life, which they distribute in a franchise model. Sanergy uses a full value-chain approach: build, collect and convert. They sell the toilets to franchisees who are residents of the community. The franchisee charges a few cents per use. Sanergy provides training, branding, marketing, government & community relations. They collect, process and treat the waste. The waste is then converted to nutrient rich fertilizer. Sanergy is creating jobs. 93% of their employees are Kenyans and 60% are from the informal housing community. In this episode of the Social Entrepreneur podcast we discuss: Where the idea for Sanergy came from. Their business model. The importance of picking the right co-founders. Using aspirational branding to change behavior. David ends by giving advice to Social Entrepreneurs. He challenges us to use systems thinking to solve really big challenges. Resources: World Toilet Day: http://www.worldtoiletday.info/ Sanergy on the web: http://saner.gy Email: [email protected] Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Sanergy/ Kiva: http://www.kiva.org Development Ventures at MIT: https://d-lab.mit.edu/courses/development-ventures Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation http://amzn.to/1N2tFnt Make Space: How to Set the Stage for Creative Collaboration http://amzn.to/1Sqm5B1 Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All http://amzn.to/1QmMYIy



003, Luni Libes, Fledge, The Conscious Company Accelerator
Nov 09 2015 38 mins  
At 37 years-old, Michael “Luni” Libes had just completed his fifth successful tech startup. Looking for a way to support his fellow entrepreneurs, Luni became a mentor-in-residence for Pinchot University’s MBA of Sustainable Business program. After watching graduates struggle to launch their mission-driven businesses, Luni founded Fledge, the Conscious Company accelerator. Each year Fledge runs a program with seven mission-driven, for-profit companies. With six cohorts completed, Fledge has 39 graduates from ten countries, one-third of whom are in Africa. Each company is making an impact on some of the most pressing challenges of our times. In this episode, Luni shares: The story of how he started Fledge The difference between an “impact company” and others who claim that they are going to change the world The Fledge model for accelerating impact companies Examples of Fledge Alumni and their impact Luni’s latest innovation FledgeX And three business models for mission-driven, for profit companies, including which model he focuses on Resources referenced in the Interview: Fledge: Fledge.co Luni’s presentation at the 1st Fledge Demo Day: https://youtu.be/gVDiLlVoCoE?t=2m47s Pinchot University (formerly the Bainbridge Graduate Institute): http://pinchot.edu/ Luni’s 2015 Fledge Demo Day presentation where he compares the numbers of charity vs. for-profit businesses: https://youtu.be/r03V6sR87aw StockBox Neighborhood Grocery: http://stockboxgrocers.com/ Techstars: http://www.techstars.com/ Evernu: http://www.evrnu.com/#intro Community Sourced Capital: https://www.communitysourcedcapital.com/ Kiva: http://www.kiva.org/ Arqlite: http://www.arqlite.rocks/ Ensibuuko: http://ensibuuko.com/ GreenChar: http://greenchar.co.ke/ FledgeX: http://fledge.co/x/ The Next Step: Guiding you from idea to startup, book by Luni Libes: http://bit.ly/NextStepLuni Kick Incubator: http://www.kickincubator.com/ Impact Hubs: http://www.impacthub.net/ Fledge Applications: http://fledge.co/about/ “What is a Social Entrepreneur” Infographic: http://tonyloyd.com/socentinfographic





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