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Oct 27 2020 81 mins 4.2k

Audio, video and pdf files from LSE's programme of public lectures and events.





In Conversation With Dr Shola Mos-Shogbamimu
Oct 27 2020 56 mins  
Contributor(s): Baroness Shafik | To celebrate Black History Month, join us for this conversation between LSE alumna Dr Shola Mos-Shogbamimu and LSE Director Minouche Shafik. Shola Mos-Shogbamimu (@SholaMos1) is a lawyer and political and women's rights activist. She speaks on law, politics, diversity equality and inclusion and women’s rights. Passionate about women in leadership, Shola is the founder & editor of the Women in Leadership publication. Additionally, Shola is an Equality Commissioner on the Commission for Gender-Equal Economy; a member of the Women’s Budget Group Policy Advisory Group; a Trustee of World Merit and a member of the steering committee of the Women’s Equality Party. An academic enthusiast, she completed her first degree LLB Hons from the University of Buckingham at the age of 19. Likewise she went on to achieve an Executive MBA from the University of Cambridge; a PhD in Law from Birkbeck, University of London and a LLM in Commercial & Corporate Law from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is the Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this, she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The London School of Economics Students' Union (@lsesu) is the representative and campaigning body for students at the London School of Economics and Political Science. LSESU is a not-for-profit organisation run by LSE students, for LSE students. The LSESU aims to give students life-changing experiences. Black History Month is one of the key dates in the Union calendar. The London School of Economics and Political Science is a social science university based in central London with a global reach. We ranked first in Europe and second in the world for social sciences and management in the QS subject rankings 2020. 125 years of LSE It’s our anniversary! Join our celebrations as we explore the past, discover new stories, and impact the future. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBlackHistoryMonth

Racism, Imperialism and Decolonization in International Relations
Oct 26 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Musab Younis, Dr Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa, Dr Nivi Manchanda | The panel will address four key questions related to International Relations as a mainstream academic discipline and racialized politics. Why might Black Lives Matter be a subject for scholars of IR or world politics? Has the discipline acknowledged its original sin in terms of erasing non-Western history in helping to shape international society? Has IR taken seriously the colonial histories that were constitutive of the formation of modern states? How can IR be democratized without wrestling with the history of racialized international political analysis and racism in general? Nivi Manchanda (@ManchandaNivi) is a Senior Lecturer in International Politics at the School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London. Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa (@o_rutazibwa) is a Senior Lecturer in International (Development) Studies at the University of Portsmouth. Musab Younis is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary, University of London. Karen E. Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at LSE. She is also Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit within the International Relations Department. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. It is ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIR


100 Great Black Britons
Oct 23 2020 56 mins  
Contributor(s): Patrick Vernon, Dr Angelina Osborne | Join us in Black History Month for this event with Angelina Osborne and Patrick Vernon, the authors of 100 Great Black Britons, to celebrate the publication of their new book. The arrival of the SS Empire Windrush in Britain from the Caribbean has been mythologised as the defining moment that changed Britain from an exclusively white country into a racially diverse one. Yet Africans have been present in Britain since Roman times and there has been a constant Black presence in Britain since the sixteenth century. In 2003, Vernon and Osborne, frustrated by the almost complete exclusion of the Black British community from mainstream notions of Britishness in education and popular media, launched their ground-breaking 100 Great Black Britons campaign, which invited the public to vote for the Black Briton they most admired. The campaign was a huge success across Britain. In 2019, in the wake of Brexit and the 2018 Windrush Scandal, Vernon and Osborne decided it was time to relaunch the campaign to ensure recognition of the continued legacy and achievement of Black people in Britain. Their book 100 Great Black Britons compiles the updated list. You can order the book, 100 Great Black Britons, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Angelina Osborne (@angburger27) is an independent researcher and heritage consultant. She received her PhD in History from the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, University of Hull in 2014. Her interests focus on Caribbean enslavement and proslavery discourses, and the history of community and education activism. Patrick Vernon OBE (@ppvernon) is a Clore and Winston Churchill Fellow, a fellow at the Imperial War Museum, a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and a former associate fellow for the Department of the History of Medicine at Warwick University. Patrick was awarded an OBE in 2012 for his work in tackling health inequalities for ethnic minority communities in Britain. Since 2010 he has been leading the campaign for Windrush Day and in 2018 kick-started the campaign for an amnesty for the Windrush Generation as part of the Windrush Scandal which led to a government U-turn in immigration policy. Jeffrey Thomas is Assistant Professor of Management in the Department of Management at LSE. EmbRace (@lseembrace) is LSE's BME staff network. EmbRace exists to raise awareness of and influence change around culture and diversity issues which affect LSE staff. It seeks to promote mutual understanding through equality, transparency, respect and recognition. The aim of the network is to provide support as well as development and networking opportunities for all members. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBlackHistoryMonth

The European Central Bank Between the Financial Crisis and Populisms: a conversation with Ewald Nowotny
Oct 23 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Sebastian Diessner, Dr Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti, Professor Ewald Nowotny, Professor Claudia Wiesner | The ECB's actions during the crisis were of immediate political importance, not only for the financial and banking sector but for the European Union and its legitimacy altogether. Drawing on different experiences, Sebastian Diessner, Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti and Claudia Wiesner offer a detailed analytical narrative of the ECB's reaction to the financial crisis and of monetary policymaking conduct during its most fraught moments. In the broader context of the EU economic governance, the book sets a particular focus on the relation of crisis’ governance to changes in public opinion in the EU, and, explicitly, public support of the ECB, to conclude with a reflection on the challenges lying ahead for the conduct of the EMU monetary policy. Sebastian Diessner (@SebDiessner) is Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute. Corrado Macchiarelli (@CMacchiarelli) is a Principal Economist at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR). Mara Monti (@MaraMonti2) is a visiting fellow at the LSE European Institute. Ewald Nowotny is an Austrian economist and Social Democratic politician, former governor of Austria's central bank Oesterreichische Nationalbank and former member of the European Central Bank’s Governing Council. Claudia Wiesner is Professor for Political Science at Fulda University of Applied Sciences. Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the LSE European Institute. You can order the book, The European Central Bank Between the Financial Crisis and Populisms (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEECB

A Commitment to Welfare: the impact of Richard Titmuss on health and social policy
Oct 22 2020 85 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor John Stewart, Professor Lucinda Platt, Dr Sara Machado, Jon Ashworth MP | Having joined the LSE in 1950, Richard Titmuss almost single-handedly, created the academic field of social administration (what we would now call social policy) in Britain. He wrote extensively on health, inequalities and other welfare issues, which have again come to the fore in the COVID-19 pandemic. What can we learn from Richard Titmuss as we look forward to the post-COVID world? Our panel of experts in health and social policy issues will reflect on the life and legacy of Richard Titmuss via the lens of his extensive work, particularly those around the principles of altruism and social solidarity, as well as his role in policy and academic networks at home and internationally. Jon Ashworth (@JonAshworth) has served as Shadow Secretary of State for Health and Social Care since 2016 and Member of Parliament for Leicester South since 2011. Sara Machado is a Fellow at the Department of Health Policy. She teaches courses in health economics, with a focus on policy applications of fundamental economic concepts, on the Department's full-time master's programme and executive education. Lucinda Platt (@PlattLucinda) is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology and Head of Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research focuses on economic inequalities, particularly those relating to ethnicity and migration, gender and disability. She also works on the history of social policy, and the evolution of the British welfare state. John Stewart is Emeritus Professor of the History of Health and Healthcare at Glasgow Caledonian University. He has written extensively on the history of health and welfare. His latest book is a biography of Richard Titmuss, published in 2020 by Policy Press. Julian Le Grand (@julianlegrand) was the Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE from 1993 to 2011. He is the author, co-author or editor of more than twenty books and over one hundred refereed journal articles on economics, philosophy and public policy. He has previously served as Senior Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister and as chair of several government working groups. He is currently Professor at LSE’s Marshall Institute. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate. 125 years of LSE It’s our anniversary! Join our celebrations as we explore the past, discover new stories, and impact the future. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19


50 Years on From the Founding of the Gay Liberation Front: progress made since and applicability today
Oct 16 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Jacob Breslow, Angela Mason, Dr Gillian Murphy, Professor Jeffrey Weeks | The GLF was formed as an international activist movement for the liberation of LGBT people after the Stonewall Riots in New York in 1969. The event will look back at its founding and early history and examine what progress has been made since and what learnings we can apply to the challenges the LGBTQ+ community faces today. Part of the event will include a short presentation from LSE’s archives that will be given by Dr Gillian Murphy, the Curator for Equality, Rights and Citizenship at LSE Library. Jacob Breslow (@jlbreslow) is Assistant Professor of Sexuality and Gender at the LSE Department of Gender Studies. He is author of Ambivalent Childhoods: Speculative Futures and the Psychic Life of the Child, forthcoming with the University of Minnesota Press (2021). Angela Mason is Labour councillor for Cantelowes ward and Camden’s Cabinet Member for Best Start for Children and Families, a founder member of the Gay Liberation Front, and Executive Director Stonewall 1992-2002. Angela is an alumnus of LSE and was made an Honorary Fellow of the School in 2011. Gillian Murphy is the Curator for Equality, Rights and Citizenship at LSE Library. She moved to LSE with the Women’s Library in 2013, where she had worked as an archivist for many years. Gillian promotes the Women’s Library collection and the Hall-Carpenter Archives through exhibitions, talks, blogs and workshops. Jeffrey Weeks joined LSE as a research assistant in October 1970, and a few weeks later he got involved in GLF, taking part in the first demo in Highbury Fields in November. Involvement on the gay liberation movement changed his life. In the 1970s he was a pioneer of LGBT history, writing an account of the emergence of the movement, Coming Out. This was the first of many books on the history and sociology of LGBT life in particular and sexuality in general. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver welcoming remarks at this celebration. Rishi Madlani (@RishiMadlani) is Head of Sustainable Finance and Just Transition for the NatWest Group and is the Global Co-Chair of their Rainbow Network, the staff network for LGBT staff and allies.

Democracy and the Supreme Court: judges and the politicians
Oct 15 2020 55 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Paul Apostolidis | The settled position of law and the judges in our constitution has undergone very severe stress testing over the last five years, through Brexit and coronavirus. Those two crises demonstrate the dominance of the executive, who as coronavirus demonstrates can change the law at will if circumstances demand it, and the dominance of politics – if the politicians don’t like the limits set by the law they will not only change the law, they may change the constitution to neuter the judges. How much at risk is the rule of law? And what should we do about it? Has politics prevented us from defending the rule of law? The lecture will set out the threat which is real, the consequences which are dire, and the steps we can take both to form a coalition which defends the rule of law and the specific constitutional changes needed to embed the rule of law. Charlie Falconer (@LordCFalconer) is an English qualified barrister and partner based in Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher’s London office. The former UK Lord Chancellor and first Secretary of State for Justice spent 25 years as a commercial barrister, becoming a QC in 1991. Paul Apostolidis is Associate Professorial Lecturer and Deputy Head of Department for Education in the Department of Government at LSE. This discussion was hosted in partnership with Benjamin Franklin House, the world's only remaining home of Benjamin Franklin open to the public as a museum and educational facility. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDemocracy

Evaluating the Impact of Labour Market Reforms in Greece during 2010-2018
Oct 13 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Nikos Vettas | In the context of three consecutive bail out programs, the Greek state legislated and implemented various reforms aiming to restore its fiscal sustainability and external competitiveness. In this context, the most significant and radical structural reforms took place in the labour market. This public lecture will evaluate the impact of Greek labour market reforms on microeconomic incentives of individuals in relation to entering the formal labour market and estimate the impact of labour market reforms on selected macroeconomic and social indicators. Nikos Vettas is the General Director of the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Research (IOBE) since 2013 and a Professor at the Athens University of Economics and Business since 2003, where he has served as the Chairman of the Economics Department and a member of the University Council. Has a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and has been an Associate Professor at Duke University and a visiting Professor at INSEAD. He serves as Associate Editor of the International Journal of Industrial Organization, a Research Fellow at CEPR, and member of the Executive Committee of the European Association for Research in Industrial Economics. He has been an Associate Editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association and of the Journal of Industrial Economics, a member of the Hellenic Competition Commission and of the Economic Advisory Group for Competition Policy at the EC. Since 2002, a co-organizer of the annual Conference for Research on Economic Theory and Econometrics. His research has been published in leading journals such as the International Economic Review, European Economic Review, Rand Journal of Economics, and the Review of Economic Studies. He is co-editor of “Beyond Austerity: Reforming the Greek Economy”, MIT Press, 2017. Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in three areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He has significant policy engagement on all three areas, including appointments in Experts Committees (e.g., on Regional Incentives policy and on Minimum Wage policy in Greece) and work with international bodies such as the European Commission (DG Regio, DG EMPL, DG EAC), the CEFTA Secretariat and the EBRD. He has published widely in economics and regional science journals, including Oxford Economic Papers, the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of Regional Science, Regional Studies, Urban Studies, and others. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute.

Young People and (anti-) Racism: whose lives matter in Europe?
Oct 12 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Manmit Bhambra, Hiba Latreche, Magid Magid, Dr Emilia Zenzile Roig | In Europe, racism is often dismissed as an issue of the past, the others, or the extremes. People of colour, activists, and academics alike have long challenged this view. Now, in the wake of global protests against racism and police brutality, European publics at large have also been called to reckon with the role of race on the continent. This panel will discuss how racism has deeply shaped both European past and present and how young people today can determine how it’ll shape Europe’s future. Asking whose lives matter in Europe, the event will explore issues of European identity, religion, politics, and migration. The speakers will discuss young people’s role in anti-racist activism as well as the experiences of young people of colour. Most fundamentally, the panel will not only talk about who gets to be European in Europe today, but what it could mean to belong to Europe tomorrow. Manmit Bhambra (@BhambraManmit) is the Research Officer of the Religion and Global Society research unit and is coordinating its inaugural project, Strengthening Religious Cooperation in Global London. Her research interests are centred around identity politics and formation, ethnic, religious and national identities as well as the broader themes of race, inclusion and minority rights. She has recently worked on research projects with young people at the LSE’s European Institute and Middle East Centre and works actively with youth organisations throughout the U.K. and is interested in issues facing young people today. Hiba Latreche is a Law graduate from the University of Strasbourg, France. Whilst pursuing her studies, she has been serving as the General Secretary of the Forum of European Muslim Youth and Student Organisations (FEMYSO), which works towards representing, empowering and developing youth to build a more diverse, cohesive and vibrant Europe. She previously served as the Head of Anti-Discrimination department of EtudiantsMusulmans de France (EMF) and is active within her community, volunteering on issues of civil rights, humanitarian aid and combatting sexism and racism. Magid Magid (@MagicMagid) is a Somali-British activist, writer and a former elected politician. He was a Green Party MEP representing Yorkshire & the Humber at the European Parliament and was previously the youngest ever Lord Mayor of Sheffield. Emilia Zenzile Roig (@EmiliaZenzile) is the Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Intersectional Justice (CIJ), a Berlin-based organisation combatting inequality and discrimination in Europe. She is faculty member of the Social Justice Study Abroad Program of DePaul University of Chicago and has taught graduate and post-graduate courses on Intersectionality Theory, Postcolonial Studies, Critical Race Theory and International and European Law at prominent European universities. She holds a PhD in political science, a Master of Public Policy and an MBA from the Humboldt University of Berlin, the Hertie School of Governance and Jean Moulin University of Lyon. Jennifer Jackson-Preece is an Associate Professor in Nationalism, with a joint appointment in both LSE's European Institute and the Department of International Relations The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The 89 Initiative (@89initiative) is a European think-do tank. Through cutting-edge research, the Initiative seeks to help solve Europe’s biggest generational challenges and nudge policy-makers and society forward. This event is part of the ‘LSE European Institute Series: Beyond Eurocentrism’. Understanding Europe requires going beyond Eurocentrism. And yet studies of Europe may still retain the traces of Eurocentric assumptions and prejudices. This event series aims to explore how the shape and shaping of Europe – its political-economy, its political policy making, or its political culture – needs to be rethought in a time of the exhaustion of Eurocentrism. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurocentrism


Is perfect the enemy of the possible?
Oct 06 2020 17 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Thomas Curran | Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran about the potential pitfalls of wanting to be perfect. Our society values perfection, but is the concept of perfect really that good for us? The latest episode of LSE IQ explores perfectionism. In this bitesized episode of the LSE IQ podcast, Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. While aspiring to perfection may still be viewed positively by many, Dr Curran’s research reveals that the drive to be the best can potentially do more harm than good. Are the potential downsides worth it when balanced against the possible achievements that can come from being a perfectionist? In a discussion which explores the realities of being a perfectionist, we ask, is perfection really worth it? Contributors   Dr Thomas Curran https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Tom-Curran   Research  A test of social learning and parent socialization perspectives on the development of perfectionism by Thomas Curran, Daniel J Madigan, Andrew P Hill and Annett Victoria Stornæs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339433945_A_test_of_social_learning_and_parent_socialization_perspectives_on_the_development_of_perfectionism Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 by Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/101352/1/Curran_Hill2018.pdf


The Long Ascent: confronting the crisis and building a more resilient economy
Oct 06 2020 57 mins  
Contributor(s): Kristalina Georgieva, Sara Eisen | Join us for this event to celebrate LSE's 125th Anniversary with Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund and LSE Director Minouche Shafik. Kristalina Georgieva will deliver the outlook for the global economy. In her speech ahead of the IMF-World Bank Annual Meetings, she will also outline policy priorities to overcome the COVID-19 Crisis. Kristalina Georgieva (@KGeorgieva) was selected Managing Director of the IMF on September 25, 2019. She assumed her position on October 1, 2019. Before joining the Fund, Ms. Georgieva was CEO of the World Bank from January 2017 to September 2019, during which time she also served as Interim President of the World Bank Group for three months. Previously, Ms Georgieva helped shape the agenda of the European Union. She served as European Commission Vice President for Budget and Human Resources, overseeing the EU’s €161 billion (US $175bn) budget and 33,000 staff. Before that, she was Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, managing one of the world’s largest humanitarian aid budgets. Prior to joining the European Commission, Ms Georgieva worked for 17 years at the World Bank, culminating in her appointment as Vice President and Corporate Secretary in 2008. Ms Georgieva holds a Ph.D in Economic Science and a M.A. in Political Economy and Sociology from the University of National and World Economy, Sofia, where she was an Associate Professor between 1977 and 1993. During her academic career, she was visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sara Eisen is co-anchor of CNBC’s “Closing Bell” (M-F, 3PM-5PM ET). She is known for her deep expertise in financial markets and the global economy as well as regular news making interviews with some of the most prominent names in the financial world, including Phil Knight, Leon Black, Janet Yellen and Christine Lagarde, among others. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. It’s our anniversary! Join our celebrations as we explore the past, discover new stories, and impact the future. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSE125 Thanks to LSE's Financial Markets Group for their collaboration on this event.

What’s the oil rush in Somalia?
Oct 06 2020 100 mins  
Contributor(s): Joakim Gundel, Dr Claire Elder, Dr Mohamed Gaas, Abdisalam Mohamed | Somalia is in pre-election mode and is at the same time pushing for the licensing of oil, based on the promising prospects revealed by seismic surveys. A maritime dispute between Somalia and Kenya, in the International Court of Justice, is part of wider regional interests. In 2020, Covid-19 has dramatically reduced the demand and price of oil. The panel will discuss the implications of these dynamics. Joakim Gundel is the recipient of a small grant from the CRP, a long established researcher on the Somali territories and an ex member of the UN Panel of Experts on Somalia. Claire Elder (@celder_m) is a Fellow at the LSE, at the Centre for Public Authority and International Development. She completed her PhD at the University of Oxford in 2019 having previously worked for International Crisis Group in Nairobi. Her research is on diaspora politics, transnational governance and business-state relations in Somalia. Mohamed Gaas (@Gaas_M) has a PhD in Development Studies from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. He has worked in various research capacities on the Horn of Africa and Somalia and has published on a number of themes, including in areas of peacebuilding and piracy. Abdisalam Mohamed is an economist and PhD candidate at the Adam Smith Institute, University of Glasgow. He has worked in Somalia for the United Nations Development Programme as well as in Norway, where he lives, working as an energy economist and analyst. Jessica Watkins (@jesterwatkins) is Research Officer at the Middle East Centre, at the LSE, and works on the Conflict Research Programme (CRP). The Conflict Research Programme is based within LSE IDEAS.

Brexit and Culture Wars: is this a new 'normal'?
Oct 05 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor John Denham, Professor Sara Hobolt, Chaminda Jayanetti | Brexit has divided Britain like no other political issue in a generation. It raises questions about our social cohesion and our national identity. As political campaigns around the world have elevated identity issues, we ask: is Brexit a symptom or a cause of a new culture war? How should we respond? John Denham is Director of the Centre for English Identity and Politics at the University of Southampton. He is a former Labour cabinet minister and Member of Parliament for Southampton, Ichen. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute. She is the Chair of the European Election Studies (EES) and the Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded project EUDEMOS: Constrained Democracy: Citizens' Responses to Limited Political Choice in the European Union. Chaminda Jayanetti (@cjayanetti) is a journalist who focuses on politics, social policy and public services. He writes for several notable publications including The Guardian, The Independent, and The Observer. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. (Owing to technical problems Professor Kevin Featherstone was the Chair for this event). This event is part of the LSE Programme, 'Brexit and Beyond', a dedicated series to stimulate the public debate and informed discussion about this most pivotal topic. It comprises a variety of events, targeting LSE staff and students, as well as the general public and specific categories of policy-makers, practitioners and professionals working on Brexit; with the aim of continuing to shape the discussion surrounding its complex and uncertain agenda. The Programme is organised by LSE's European Institute and School of Public Policy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Golfing with Trump: economic decline, inequality, and the rise of populism in the US
Oct 01 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Antigone Lyberaki | How far does economic decline and the rise of inequalities explain the rise of populism? Here, we examine the support for Donald Trump at the local level across the US to assess the importance of these factors: in particular, inter-regional and inter-personal inequalities. We consider how far similar factors explain political changes across other countries also. And, we discuss whether such political effects are here to stay or what might be done to mitigate them. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose (@rodriguez_pose) is Professor of Economic Geography at LSE. He has a long track record of research in regional growth and disparities, fiscal and political decentralisation, regional innovation, and development policies and strategies. His research is widely cited in academic circles and has also been frequently used by policy and decision-makers. Dimitris Kairidis (@DimKairidis) is a member of the Greek Parliament, representing Athens-North for the center-right party of New Democracy. He is a Professor of International Politics at Panteion University of Athens and the Founding Director of the Navarino Network in Thessaloniki. He has taught at many universities in Greece and abroad and is a regular TV political commentator. He has published extensively on international politics, including books on nationalism and ethnic conflict, US foreign policy and Greek-Turkish relations. Antigone Lyberaki (@ALyberaki), is an economist, Professor of Economics at Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences (in Athens). She was educated at Athens University (Economics) and at the Institute of Development Studies at Sussex University. She has also taught at the City University of New York (Queen’s College) and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France. Ηer research interests have focused on the interplay between social structures and economic performance. She has published extensively and has participated in civil society initiatives related to women’s rights, migration and development. Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in the areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He is an Associate Professor in Political Economy, a Member of the Hellenic Observatory, LSE and Director of LSEE: Research on South Eastern Europe. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, NBG is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETrump

The World: a brief introduction
Sep 23 2020 59 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Richard Haass, Professor Peter Trubowitz | Richard Haass (@RichardHaass) is a veteran diplomat, a prominent voice on American foreign policy, and an established leader of nonprofit institutions. He is in his eighteenth year as president of the Council on Foreign Relations, an independent, nonpartisan membership organisation, think tank, publisher, and educational institution dedicated to being a resource to help people better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. In 2013, he served as the chair of the multiparty negotiations in Northern Ireland that provided the foundation for the 2014 Stormont House Agreement. For his efforts to promote peace and conflict resolution, he received the 2013 Tipperary International Peace Award. From January 2001 to June 2003, Dr Haass was director of policy planning for the Department of State, where he directed the policy planning staff and was a principal advisor to Secretary of State Colin Powell. Confirmed by the U.S. Senate to hold the rank of ambassador, Dr Haass also served as U.S. coordinator for policy toward the future of Afghanistan and U.S. envoy to the Northern Ireland peace process. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. You can order the book, The World: a brief introduction, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The Department of International Relations is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 5th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2020 tables for Politics and International Studies.

Why Can't We All Just Get Along?
Sep 23 2020 57 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Tony Travers | In an increasingly divided society, Iain examines why we’ve all become so disrespectful and intolerant. Using experiences from his career in politics and the media, he says it doesn’t have to be this way, and suggests how we can all emerge from tribalism and division and become more respectful to each other and those who govern us. His book is optimistic about the fundamental decencies embedded in human nature and uses deeply personal anecdotes to explain why we can look forward in a positive way to a better life both in personal and material terms. Iain Dale (@IainDale) presents the Evening Show on LBC Radio (Monday-Thursday 7pm-10pm). He joined LBC in 2010 and presented the Drivetime show for five and a half years, from March 2013 until August 2018. This year he has two new books being published – in August Why Can’t We All Get Along: Shout Less, Listen More and in November The Prime Ministers 1721-2020: Three Hundred Years of Political Leadership. Iain is a visiting professor of politics and broadcasting at the University of East Anglia, which he graduated from in 1985 with a degree in German and Linguistics. Iain was a panellist on CNN Talk on CNN International and is a regular contributor to Newsnight, the Andrew Marr Show, Good Morning Britain and Channel 5’s Jeremy Vine. He co-hosts a weekly podcast with former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith called ‘For the Many’, the ‘Iain Dale Book Club’ podcast, the Iain Dale All Talk podcast and also a podcast of his weekly ‘Cross Question’ political panel show. Until June 2018 Iain was managing director of Britain’s leading political publisher, Biteback Publishing. He formed the company in 2009 and published more than 600 books. Iain is a British political commentator and blogger. He is a regular columnist for the Telegraph, Evening Standard and ‘I’ paper. He has been a contributing editor for GQ Magazine, writes for various national newspapers and for seven years penned a weekly diary for the Eastern Daily Press. For five years he wrote a monthly column in the gay lifestyle magazine, Attitude and was a regular presenter of Radio 4’s What the Papers Say. He writes a weekly diary column for ConservativeHome.com and is the media critics for Reaction.Life. He is a contributing editor to MACE magazine. Iain has written or edited more than forty books including The NHS: Things That Need to be Said, Memories of Margaret Thatcher, The Big Book of Boris, 500 of the Most Acerbic, Witty & Erudite Things Ever Said About Politics, West Ham: When Football Was Football, Norwich City: When Football Was Football and Honourable Ladies: Profiles of Women MPs 1918-2019. You can order the book, Why Can’t We All Get Along: Shout Less, Listen More (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government.


Digital Technologies in the Lives of Children and Young People
Sep 22 2020 75 mins  
Contributor(s): June Lowery-Kingston, Dr Marco Hubert, Professor Halla Bjørk Holmarsdottir, Professor Uwe Hasebrink, Professor Leen d’Haenens | The lives of children in Europe are becoming digital by default. Information and communication technologies are valued for the opportunities they afford to young generations for participation, skill development, learning and future employability. But how are children and young people engaging with digital technologies? What are the impacts of digital technologies on children’s and young people’s health, lifestyles, well-being, safety and security? This webinar will contrast diverse approaches to thinking about the digital world in relation to children and youth, drawing on four newly funded Horizon 2020 projects on “the impact of technological transformations on children and youth”: DIGYMATEX, DigiGen, ySKILLS and CO:RE. How does each project conceptualise children and young people, digital technologies, and the risks and opportunities that arise? How does each project hope to contribute to knowledge and to the development of EU policies? Leen d’Haenens (@LeendHaenens) is Full Professor at the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Project Coordinator of Youth Skills (ySKILLS). ySKILLS investigates the new skill sets needed to benefit from evermore digitised environments and aims at enhancing and maximising the long-term positive impact of the digital environment. Leen is an expert on European media policy and its impact on citizens. She has particular expertise on the performance of private and public service media outlets as well as social media platforms and their impact on children and adolescents, with a focus on vulnerable young people with a migration background. Uwe Hasebrink (@UweHasebrink) is Director of the Leibniz Institute for Media Research, Hans-Bredow-Institut (HBI), Professor in Empirical Communication Research at the University of Hamburg and the Project Coordinator of CO:RE – Children Online: Research and Evidence. CO:RE aims to create a European knowledge platform on digital technologies in the lives of children and young people. Uwe is the coordinator of the European research network EU Kids Online (since 2014) and a member of the steering group of the research network Global Kids Online. His research interests refer to media uses and effects in digital environments, with a particular focus on intercultural comparisons. Halla Bjørk Holmarsdottir (@HallaHolmars) is a Professor at the Oslo Metropoli-tan University and Project Coordinator of DigiGen. DigiGen investi-gates digital media use in educational institutions, the home, as a leisure activity and aim at coming to grips with children’s and young people’s digital citizenship. Halla’s work focuses on compar-ative educational policies and practices, particularly with regard to marginalization and social justice. Drawing on interdisciplinary ap-proaches Halla has conducted research on language issues, gen-der and education and youth research in countries such as Na-mibia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania and more recently focusing on the EU. Marco Hubert (@mah2105) is an Associate Professor at the Aarhus University and the Project Coordinator of DIGYMATEX. DIGYMATEX focuses on the development of the Digital Youth Maturity Index (DYMI), an evidence-based tool to assist in understanding and determining children’s digital maturity. Marco’s work offers insights into internet of things and smart de-vice adoption and use, antecedents to consumer behaviour, and individual-based innovation. June Lowery-Kingston (@lk_june) is Head of Unit Accessibility, Multilingualism & Safer Internet at the Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology (DG CNECT) at the European Commission. Her work aims to promote a better internet for children by protecting and empowering children online, and improving the quality of content available to them. Her unit is also responsible for making the digital single Market more accessible, secure and inclusive and for monitoring the implementation of the Web Accessibility Directive. Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) is Professor of Social Psychology at the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has published 20 books including The Class: Living and Learning in the Digital Age. She directs the projects “Children’s Data and Privacy Online,” “Global Kids Online” (with UNICEF) and “Parenting for a Digital Future”, and she is Deputy Director of the UKRI-funded “Nurture Network.” Since founding the 33 country EU Kids Online network, Sonia has advised the UK government, European Commission, European Parliament, Council of Europe, OECD and UNICEF. This event is part of a webinar series on theory for the EU H2020 project CO:RE - Children Online: Research and Evidence. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2020 QS World University Rankings). Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSEMedia #COREH2020

How to Make the World Add Up
Sep 17 2020 59 mins  
Contributor(s): Tim Harford | Join us for this online public event with Tim Harford on the day his new book, How to Make the World Add Up: Ten Rules for Thinking Differently About Numbers, is published. When was the last time you read a grand statement, accompanied by a large number, and wondered whether it could really be true? Statistics are vital in helping us tell stories – we see them in the papers, on social media, and we hear them used in everyday conversation – and yet we doubt them more than ever.But numbers – in the right hands – have the power to change the world for the better. Contrary to popular belief, good statistics are not a trick, although they are a kind of magic. Good statistics are not smoke and mirrors; in fact, they help us see more clearly. Good statistics are like a telescope for an astronomer, a microscope for a bacteriologist, or an X-ray for a radiologist. If we are willing to let them, good statistics help us see things about the world around us and about ourselves – both large and small – that we would not be able to see in any other way. In How to Make the World Add Up, Tim Harford draws on his experience as both an economist and presenter of the BBC’s radio show More or Less. He takes us deep into the world of disinformation and obfuscation, bad research and misplaced motivation to find those priceless jewels of data and analysis. Tim Harford (@TimHarford) is a senior columnist for the Financial Times and the presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less. Hew as awarded the OBE ‘For Services to Improving Economic Understanding’ in 2019. He was the winner of the Bastiat Prize for economic journalism in 2006, and More or Less was commended for excellence in journalism by the Royal Statistical Society in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Harford lives in Oxford with his wife and three children, and is a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. His other books include The Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy, The Next Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy, Messy, The Undercover Economist, The Logic of Life and Adapt. You can order the book, How to Make the World Add Up, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Irini Moustaki (@MoustakiIrini) is Professor of Social Statistics at LSE. Her research interests are in the areas of latent variable models and structural equation models and her methodological work includes treatment of missing data, longitudinal data, detection of outliers, goodness-of-fit tests and advanced estimation methods. Furthermore, she has made methodological and applied contributions in the areas of comparative cross-national studies and epidemiological studies on rare diseases. She was the Executive Editor of the journal Psychometrika for over four years and she is the President elect of the Psychometric Society. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) is an international community for the development of statistical methodology, with an illustrious history of contributions to research and teaching in the social sciences.

Greed is Dead: politics after individualism
Sep 16 2020 64 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Paul Collier, Professor John Kay, Baroness Cavendish | Join us for this online discussion between Paul Collier and John Kay about their new book, Greed is Dead: Politics After Individualism, that seeks to set out practical, original and achievable solutions to the extreme political divisions in Britain. Paul Collier is the Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Oxford Blavatnik School of Government and a Director of the International Growth Centre based at LSE. He is the author of The Future of Capitalism, which won the 2019 Handelsblatt Prize; The Bottom Billion, which won the Lionel Gelber Prize and Arthur Ross Prize of the Council on Foreign Relations; The Plundered Planet, Exodus and Refuge (with Alexander Betts). Collier has served as Director of the Research Department of the World Bank, and works with governments around the world. John Kay (@ProfJohnKay) is a Fellow of St John's College, Oxford and has held professorial appointments at the University of Oxford, London Business School and LSE. His career has spanned academia, business, finance and public policy. He was the founding head of the Oxford Said Business School and the Institute for Fiscal Studies – Britain’s most respected think tank. He is the author of The Truth About Markets, Obliquity, Other People's Money and other books and for twenty years contributed a regular column to the Financial Times. You can order the book, Greed is Dead: Politics After Individualism, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Camilla Cavendish (@CamCavendish) is an award-winning journalist and broadcaster, and the author of Extra Time: Ten Lessons for an Ageing World. She is a Senior Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School and is also Contributing Editor at the Financial Times where she writes a weekly open column on Saturdays. She was Head of the Prime Minister’s UK Policy Unit under David Cameron and sits in the House of Lords as a non-aligned peer. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and has held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. He is the author of nearly one hundred academic articles, several academic books and two novels and has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and to governments, central banks and private businesses around the world. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPolitics

How We Can Save Capitalism
Sep 16 2020 61 mins  
Contributor(s): Michael O’Leary, Warren Valdmanis | Join Michael O'Leary and Warren Valdmanis, authors of Accountable: How we Can Save Capitalism, for this event about their new book, which offers a blueprint for everyone to take responsibility for using their economic power as consumers, as investors, as employees, and as voters to trigger a fundamental shift away from an economy that is unethical, unfair, and destructive to our environment and institutions. Their investigation cuts through the tired dogma of current economic thinking to reveal a hopeful truth: if we can make our corporations accountable to a deeper purpose, we can make capitalism both prosperous and good. Michael O’Leary (@thisismichaelo) was on the founding team of Bain Capital’s social impact fund. He has served as an economic policy advisor in the United States Senate and on two presidential campaigns. Michael studied philosophy at Harvard College and earned his MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Warren Valdmanis leads a social impact fund that invests in the American workforce. He was previously a managing director with Bain Capital’s social impact fund, and before that invested with Bain Capital’s private equity team for over a decade. Warren studied economics at Dartmouth College and earned his MBA from Harvard Business School. You can order the book, Accountable: How We Can Save Capitalism, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Sarah Ashwin is Professor of Comparative Employment Relations and Deputy Head of Department (Teaching and Learning) in the Department of Management at LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management.

Innovation and Inclusive Growth: COVID-19 as a window of opportunity
Sep 16 2020 64 mins  
Contributor(s): Gordon Brown, Professor Riccardo Crescenzi, Professor Mariana Mazzucato, Lord Sainsbury, Tharman Shanmugaratnam | David Sainsbury’s book Windows of Opportunity: How Nations Create Wealth came out just before COVID-19 forced the global economy into lockdown. This high-level panel looks at the pandemic as an opportunity to promote inclusive growth and innovation in a more sustainable way. In particular, it will examine the role of the emerging and developing world in creating new sources of growth and the role leadership plays in achieving structural transformation. Gordon Brown (@OfficeGSBrown) is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He is Chair of the Global Strategic Infrastructure Initiative of the World Economic Forum and also serves as Distinguished Global Leader in Residence of New York University. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010. Riccardo Crescenzi (@crescenzi_r) is Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is also an Associate at the Centre for International Development (CID) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and is affiliated with the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and the Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) at the LSE. He has been a Visiting Scholar at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Taubman Centre, Harvard University. Until September 2014 he was Programme Director of the MSc in Local Economic Development. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation & Public Value at University College London (UCL), she is the Founding Director of the UCL Institute for Innovation & Public Purpose. She is winner of international prizes including the 2020 John Von Neumann Award, the 2019 All European Academies Madame de Staël Prize for Cultural Values, and 2018 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. Her book The Entrepreneurial State: debunking public vs. private sector myths (2013) investigates the role of public organizations in playing the ‘investor of first resort’ role in the history of technological change. Her book The Value of Everything: making and taking in the global economy (2018) brings value theory back to the center of economics in order to reward value creation over value extraction. David Sainsbury was Finance Director of J. Sainsbury plc from 1973 – 1990 and Chairman from 1992 – 1998. He became Lord Sainsbury of Turville in October, 1997 and was appointed Minister of Science and Innovation from July 1998 until November 2006. He is the founder of the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and founded and chairs the Institute for Government. He was elected Chancellor of the University of Cambridge in October 2011. David's new book is Windows of Opportunity: How Nations Create Wealth. Tharman Shanmugaratnam (@Tharman_S) is Senior Minister in Singapore, after serving as Deputy Prime Minister for eight years. He is also Coordinating Minister for Social Policies, and advises the Prime Minister on economic policies. In addition, he chairs the National Jobs Council, aimed at rebuilding skills and jobs in the wake of COVID-19. Tharman is, concurrently, Chairman of the Monetary Authority of Singapore. He served for several years earlier as Minister of Finance, and as Minister for Education. Internationally, Tharman chairs the Group of Thirty, a global council of economic and financial leaders from the public and private sectors and academia. He also co-chairs the Global Education Forum, and the Advisory Board for the UN’s Human Development Report. He did his university education at the LSE, University of Cambridge and Harvard University. You can order the book, Windows of Opportunity: How Nations Create Wealth, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics at LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The Centre for Economic Policy Research is a network of over 1500 Research Fellows and Affiliates, based primarily in European universities. The Centre coordinates the research activities of its Fellows and Affiliates and communicates the results to the public and private sectors. CEPR is an entrepreneur, developing research initiatives with the producers, consumers and sponsors of research. Established in 1983, CEPR is a European economics research organisation with uniquely wide-ranging scope and activities. The Centre is pluralist and non-partisan, bringing economic research to bear on the analysis of medium- and long-run policy questions. This event forms part of LSE’s Shaping the Post-COVID World initiative, a series of debates about the direction the world could and should be taking after the crisis. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Making Use of Moral and Social Capital: faith communities and climate finance
Sep 15 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Mohammed Kroessin, Loretta Minghella, Professor Nick Robins | This online event will be a live discussion focused on climate finance and the role faith communities might play in global system change, both in the strategic use of their capital assets and their moral and social capital. Speakers will outline the priorities and transition pathways required in our global financial system at the macro and micro levels to support and advance measures to combat climate change and reflect upon potential future opportunities for faith communities at all levels to contribute to the global emergency productively and strategically. Mohammed R. Kroessin is a development economist with 20 years’ experience of working with Islamic development and financial institutions on strategies for sustainable development and social impact. He has formerly worked for Chambers of Commerce and the Centre for Enterprise in the UK, was Asst. CEO of Muslim Aid and is now heading Islamic Relief’s Global Islamic Microfinance Unit. He holds a Masters in international political economy (Kent) and a Masters in development management (Westminster Business School). He has completed his PhD at the University of Birmingham on the political economy of Islamic finance. He previously was a research associate at the University of Birmingham, working on the DFID funded Religions & Development Research Programme, and a Visiting Research Fellow at Aston Business School where he focused on social entrepreneurship. He is currently a lecturer in Islamic Microfinance at the Frankfurt School of Finance Management. Loretta Minghella (@LMinghella) took up the role of First Church Estates Commissioner in November 2017. As the First Church Estates Commissioner, she is a member of the Church Commissioners' Board of Governors, the General Synod of the Church of England, and the Archbishops' Council. Her main duty is serving as Chair of the Assets Committee of the Church Commissioners which is responsible for stewardship of an investment portfolio of circa £8 billion. Formerly Chief Executive of Christian Aid between 2010-2017. A Lawyer by training with a career in financial regulation, Loretta was previously the Head of Enforcement Law, Policy and International Cooperation for the Financial Services Authority and former CEO of Financial Services Compensation Scheme. Loretta is a Non-Executive Director of the Banking Standards Board and is also Sarum Canon at Salisbury Cathedral. Nick Robins (@NVJRobins1) is Professor in Practice for Sustainable Finance at the Grantham Research Institute at LSE. The focus of his work is on how to mobilise finance for a just transition, the role of central banks and regulators in achieving sustainable development and how the financial system can support the restoration of nature. From 2014 to 2018, Nick was co-director of UNEP's Inquiry into a Sustainable Financial System. Before this, he was head of the Climate Change Centre of Excellence at HSBC from 2007 to 2014. He has also worked at Henderson Global Investors, IIED and the European Commission. Nick is a board member of Investor Watch and a member of a number of advisory boards including Carbon Tracker, the Climate Bonds Initiative and CreditEnable. Robert Falkner (@robert_falkner) is Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The LSE Faith Centre (@LSEFaithCentre) runs innovative programmes and events promoting religious literacy and transformational interfaith leadership supporting students to explore, challenge and question religious differences. Its work extends beyond student programming to its public engagement with governments, universities and civil society groups to build global interreligious cohesion and understanding resourced by LSE’s world class research. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy.

The Serendipity Mindset: the art and science of creating good luck
Sep 10 2020 76 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Christian Busch | In this talk, Christian Busch reveals the secrets behind the hidden force that rules the universe: serendipity. Modern life is full of chance encounters, changing plans, delayed journeys, human errors and other mishaps. So, what if we use such unpredictability to our advantage? Christian has spent a decade studying hundreds of subjects who improved their lives by learning to see opportunities in the unexpected and exploring how unexpected encounters can enhance our worldview, expand our social circles and create new professional opportunities. The Serendipity Mindset shows us that by learning to identify, act on and share serendipity, we can use uncertainty as a pathway to more joyful, purposeful and successful lives. Christian Busch (@ChrisSerendip) teaches at New York University (NYU) and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). At NYU, he directs the Global Economy programme of the Center for Global Affairs, and he co-directed LSE's Innovation & Co-Creation Lab. He is a cofounder of Sandbox Network, a leading community of young innovators active in over 20 countries, as well as Leaders on Purpose. His new book is The Serendipity Mindset The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck. You can order the book, The Serendipity Mindset The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Connson Locke joined the Department of Management in 2008 where she teaches leadership, organisational behaviour, and negotiation and decision making. She received the Department of Management Outstanding Teaching Contribution Award in 2013, was Highly Commended for Inspirational Teaching in the Student-Led Teaching Excellence Awards in 2015 and 2017, and received the LSE Excellence in Education Award in 2018. Professor Locke holds a PhD and MSc in Business Administration (Organisational Behaviour) from the University of California at Berkeley and a BA in Sociology from Harvard University where she graduated with honours. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESerendipityMindset

The Tyranny of Merit: what's become of the common good?
Sep 09 2020 61 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Michael Sandel | Join us for this online public event with Michael Sandel who will be discussing his latest book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good? In this new book Sandel argues that to overcome the polarised politics of our time, we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalisation and rising inequality. Sandel highlights the hubris a meritocracy generates among the winners and the harsh judgement it imposes on those left behind. He offers an alternative way of thinking about success - more attentive to the role of luck in human affairs, more conducive to an ethic of humility, and more hospitable to a politics of the common good. Michael Sandel teaches political philosophy at Harvard University. His writings—on justice, ethics, democracy, and markets--have been translated into 27 languages. His course “Justice” is the first Harvard course to be made freely available online and on television. It has been viewed by tens of millions of people around the world, including in China, where Sandel was named the “most influential foreign figure of the year.” (China Newsweek) Sandel’s books relate enduring themes of political philosophy to the most vexing moral and civic questions of our time. They include What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets; Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?; The Case against Perfection: Ethics in the Age of Genetic Engineering; Public Philosophy: Essays on Morality in Politics; Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy; and Liberalism and the Limits of Justice. You can order the book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.


The Role of Academia in Realising the Promise of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda
Sep 08 2020 95 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Jeni Klugman, Joana Ama Osei-Tutu, Professor Jacqui True, Dr Torunn L. Tryggestad | As we look forward to the next decade of the Women, Peace and Security agenda, this event will examine the role, contributions and potential of academic institutions – in research, advocacy, education and cross-sector engagement – in addressing the gaps that exist, determining how best to prepare and serve the next generation and contribute to the full realisation of the WPS agenda. Twenty years ago, in adopting Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security, the UN Security Council recognised the critical role that women play in preventing conflicts and building peace, and committed to upholding women’s rights in the global peace and security arena. Ten resolutions and over 80 states now support the ‘Women, Peace and Security agenda’. There is ample research, evidence and practical guidance and experience in terms of how to improve international humanitarian and security processes to ensure the participation and protection of women. Yet, in practice there are persistent and systemic obstacles to implementation and achievement of positive change. The UN has failed to align country-specific activities to its WPS objectives and the commitment of national governments is undermined by engagement in warfare, supplying arms and an overall lack of investment and funding. Women peacebuilders undertake innovative activities, learn from each other and locally effect real change. Yet these lessons and experiences are rarely translated into international policy change and local implementation at a time when conflict and violent extremism are escalating and new threats such as climate-induced disasters and a global pandemic abound. The problems are identified, the challenges well understood, and even the solutions are provided. But systemic change in standard practices is lacking. The lessons that should be learnt from successes, failures and good practice in a range of contexts are rarely taught or addressed effectively. The inertia in global institutions is at direct odds with the growing interest from a new generation of students and practitioners, who understand the relevance and importance of the WPS agenda to breaking the stalemate that hounds formal peace processes, relief and development efforts. Jeni Klugman is Managing Director of Georgetown University’s Institute for Women, Peace and Security. Previous positions include Director of Gender and Development at the World Bank, and director and lead author of three global Human Development Reports published by the UNDP. Joana Ama Osei-Tutu (@joana_oseitutu) is Head of the Women, Peace and Security Institute (WPSI) at the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC). Jacqui True (@JacquiTrue) is Professor of International Relations and Director of Monash University's Centre for Gender, Peace and Security. Professor True has authored more than 14 books, and over 100 articles and book chapters with her work on gender mainstreaming and global governance, violence against women, women, peace and security and feminist methdologies among the most cited in the fields of international relations and gender studies. Torunn L. Tryggestad (@TLTryggestad) is Deputy Director at PRIO and Director of the PRIO GPS Centre. Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is a leading academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists, policy-makers and students to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict-affected situations around the world. This event is co-hosted with the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, the PRIO Centre on Gender, Peace and Security, Monash Gender, Peace and Security Centre and the Women, Peace and Security Institute in Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS


How can we tackle air pollution?
Aug 04 2020 45 mins  
Contributor(s): Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, Dr Ute Collier, Dr Sefi Roth, Dr Thomas Smith | Seven million people die of air pollution, worldwide, every year. This episode of LSE IQ asks how this invisible killer can be tackled. Sue Windebank speaks to Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah about her campaigning work for both clean air and a new inquest into the causes of her daughter’s death. In 2013, her daughter Ella Roberta died from a rare and severe form of asthma – she was just nine years old. According to an expert report there was a "real prospect” that without unlawful levels of air pollution near their home, Ella would not have died. As well as the impact on health, the episode looks at the effects of air pollution on crime and education. It also examines air pollution on the London Underground, forest fires and clean cooking. Addressing these issue are: Dr Ute Collier, Head of Energy at Practical Action; Dr Sefi Roth, Assistant Professor of Environmental Economics at LSE; and Dr Thomas Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Geography at LSE. Contributors Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Dr Ute Collier Dr Sefi Roth Dr Thomas Smith Research ‘Crime is in the Air: The Contemporaneous Relationship between Air Pollution and Crime’ by Malvina Brody, Sefi Roth and Lutz Sager, a discussion paper by IZA Institute of Labor Economics. ‘The Long-Run Economic Consequences of High-Stakes Examinations: Evidence from Transitory Variation in Pollution’ by Avraham Ebenstein, Victor Lavy and Sefi Roth in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. ‘Spatial variability of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) on the London Underground network’ by Brynmor M Saunders, James D Smith, T.E.L Smith, David Green and B Barratt in the journal Urban Climate. ‘Review of emissions from smouldering peat fires and their contribution to regional haze episodes’ Yuqi Hu, Nieves Fernandez-Anez, T.E.L Smith and Guillermo Rein in the International Journal of Wildland Fire.

Twilight of Democracy: the Failure of Politics and the Parting of Friends
Jul 28 2020 54 mins  
Contributor(s): Anne Applebaum | As well as a work of memoir and reporting, it is a deep meditation on the central political dilemma of our time: Why did the wave of enthusiasm for liberal democracy, shared across the political spectrum in the 1980s and 90s, come to an end? How did we come to be so divided? Why did everyone get so angry? Anne Applebaum, a historian of totalitarian regimes as well as an analyst of contemporary politics, offers an original interpretation of democratic decline. She charts the rise of autocratic and paranoid governments in Poland and Hungary, the cultural despair that fuelled Brexit, the media cacophony that has driven some Spaniards to return to old nationalist slogans, the apocalyptic pessimism that led many to support the election of Trump. Political leaders and historical figures appear in the story, but the book is focused above all on the dissatisfied intellectuals, philosophers, spin doctors and journalists who deliberately sought to create new definitions of “the nation,” new political realities, and sometimes deep new divisions. Anne Applebaum (@anneapplebaum) is the author of Gulag: A History, which won the Pulitzer Prize, of Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, which won the Cundill Prize and Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine which won the Lionel Gelber and Duff Cooper prizes. She is a columnist for The Atlantic and a senior fellow of the Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University. She divides her time between Britain, Poland and the USA. After graduating from Yale University, she was a Marshall Scholar at LSE and St. Antony’s College, Oxford. You can order the book, Twilight of Democracy, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. The Department of International Relations is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEApplebaum

Populism in the Post-COVID-19 World
Jul 23 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Andrés Velasco, Jesse Norman MP | This discussion focuses on the causes and consequences of this populist surge, and the ways in which liberal democracies can respond to the challenge of authoritarian populism. Because populist governments have been especially ineffective in dealing with the pandemic, the panel will also ask whether populists will pay a price at the polls or whether, on the contrary, the economic crunch resulting from COVID-19 will further enlarge their base of political support. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government and the European Institute. Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is a Canadian author, academic and former politician. He is currently rector and President of Central European University. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Professor of Public Policy and Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Jesse Norman (@Jesse_Norman) is Financial Secretary to the Treasury, responsible for HM Revenue and Customs and the National Infrastructure Strategy. His books include biographies of Edmund Burke and Adam Smith. He has been the Member of Parliament for Hereford and South Herefordshire since 2010. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. LSEPPR is a brand new public policy journal hosted by the School of Public Policy at LSE and published by LSE Press (@LSEPress). It will bring together policy-relevant research from across the social sciences. The first issue focuses on the causes and consequences of populist politics around the world, and discusses ways in which liberal democracies can respond to the challenge of authoritarian populism. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Spinoza Programme on Institutions, Organizations and Growth supports research and events at LSE. It looks at contemporary challenges in economic policy formation to support long-run development. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPPR

How to Reform the WTO?
Jul 20 2020 93 mins  
Contributor(s): Ambassador Dr Jesus Seade, Sir Vince Cable, Dr Swati Dhingra, Piroska Nagy Mohacsi | Nominations for the position have just closed. LSE is organising a mini-series of presentations and discussions with the candidates. The first of the candidates to present their vision for globalisation, trade and the WTO will be Dr Jesus Seade, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico and Mexico’s chief negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA) which came into force on July 1 this year. Multilateral institutions are increasingly being challenged in recent years. One important criticism is that leaders for these organisations are not selected in a competitive and transparent manner. Promoting a stronger selection process should help enhance the legitimacy of these institutions. Calls for change have been particularly strong at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the global body dealing with the rules of trade between nations. Vince Cable (@vincecable) is Professor in Practice at the Institute of Global Affairs, LSE. Sir Vince is the former Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (2010-2015) and represented the constituency of Twickenham as a Liberal Democrat MP and was party leader from 2017-19. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the LSE, researching globalisation and industrial policy. Jesus Seade (@JesusSeade) is a candidate for WTO Director-General; Chief Negotiator of the USMCA, the US, Mexico and Canada Trade Agreement (successor of NAFTA); and Undersecretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director, Institute of Global Affairs at the LSE School of Public Policy. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE. He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.


Journalism, Power and Pandemic
Jul 15 2020 57 mins  
Contributor(s): Anushka Asthana, Pippa Crerar, Annette Dittert, Richard Horton, Sir Craig Oliver | How well has the UK news media kept the public informed and held the authorities to account during the COVID-19 crisis? Leading journalists and political communicators discuss how the news media has coped with the practical, editorial and political challenges of covering coronavirus. Anushka Asthana (@AnushkaAsthana) is editor-at-large for the Guardian, and host of the daily news podcast, Today in Focus. Pippa Crerar (@PippaCrerar) is the Political Editor of the Daily Mirror and Parliamentary Press Gallery chair Annette Dittert (@annettedittert) is London Bureau Chief of ARD. Richard Horton (@richardhorton1) is Editor of The Lancet. Craig Oliver (@CraigOliver100) is former No10 Director of Politics & Communications and Editor of BBC News at 6pm & 10pm. Charlie Beckett (@CharlieBeckett) is Professor of Practice, Director of Polis and the Polis/LSE Journalism AI project in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Media and Communications, School of Public Policy and Institute of Global Affairs. The Department of Media and Communications (@MediaLSE) is a world-leading centre for education and research in communication and media studies at the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London. We are ranked #1 in the UK and #3 globally in our field (2020 QS World University Rankings). The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19


Against the System: anger, belonging and the crisis of liberalism
Jul 14 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu, Professor Lea Ypi | Recent elections in the advanced western democracies have undermined the basic foundations of political systems that had previously beaten back all challenges-from both the left and the right. The COVID-19 pandemic has intensified the backlash, further destabilising an already fragile political order. Eric Lonergan, Martin Sandbu and Lea Ypi discuss their recent research about the political and economic causes of this turbulence and consider ways out of the impasse. Eric Lonergan (@ericlonners) is is a macro hedge fund manager, economist, and co-author of Angrynomics. Martin Sandbu (@MESandbu) is European Economics Commentator for the Financial Times and author of The Economics of Belonging. Lea Ypi (@lea_ypi) is Professor in Political Theory in the LSE Department of Government. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Professor of Comparative Politics in the LSE Department of Government and author of Anti-System Politics. You can order the books, The Economics of Belonging by Martin Sandbu, Angrynomics by Eric Lonergan and Anti-System Politics by Jonathan Hopkin (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPoliticalSystems Podcasts & Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from Against the System: anger, belonging and the crisis of liberalism. A video of this event is available to watch at Against the System: anger, belonging and the crisis of liberalism. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Prospects for the UK Economy and Public Spending After COVID-19: new austerity or a new economy?
Jul 10 2020 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Stephanie Flanders, Professor Stephen Machin, Dr Gemma Tetlow | The UK government’s response to COVID-19 has seen sudden growth in public spending accompanied by a sharp fall in tax receipts. Public sector borrowing may exceed £300bn in 2020-21, with the UK’s national debt exceeding annual GDP for the first time for decades. What short-term stimuli might the Chancellor now employ to re-start growth? Can the government imaginably return to austerity policies? Will inequality have increased? Is this the time for a new approach to economic management? Can the economy go back to normal and grow if social distancing restrictions persist? Is the UK out of line with comparable countries? And what about Brexit? The panel will consider these issues and more. Stephanie Flanders (@MyStephanomics) has been Senior Executive Editor for Economics at Bloomberg News and head of Bloomberg Economics since October 2017. She was previously Chief Market Strategist for Europe at J P Morgan Asset Management in London (2013-17) and both BBC Economics Editor and BBC Newsnight’s Economics Editor (2002-13). Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, has been President of the European Association of Labour Economists, is a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists and was an independent member of the UK Low Pay Commission from 2007-14. He has researched extensively in various areas of empirical economics, including current research interests in the areas of labour market inequality, social mobility, the economics of education and the economics of crime. Gemma Tetlow (@gemmatetlow) is Chief Economist at the Institute for Government. Between 2016 and 2018, Gemma was Economics Correspondent at the Financial Times, reporting on and analysing economic developments in the UK and globally. Before that, she led the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ work on public finances and pensions. She has a PhD in economics from University College London. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs and the School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcasts and Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from Prospects for the UK Economy and Public Spending After COVID-19: new austerity or a new economy? A video of this event is available to watch at Prospects for the UK Economy and Public Spending After COVID-19: new austerity or a new economy? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Debt Relief and Africa During COVID-19: the global response
Jul 09 2020 91 mins  
Contributor(s): Mma Amara Ekeruche, Professor Anna Gelpern, Eric LeCompte, Dr Shirley Yu, Dr David Luke | The COVID-19 pandemic has decimated government fiscal policies across the globe, and economies worldwide are heading into historic recessions. Countries’ capabilities to address new challenges are increasingly stretched, yet efforts to tackle a health crisis in a globalised world remain highly interconnected. As low-income countries struggle to provide robust spending plans to support the population, calls have risen for the implementation of immediate debt relief from bilateral, multilateral and private creditors to African countries. Africa’s external debt payments have almost doubled in recent years, forming the backdrop of a reoccurring conversation around the debt’s sustainability at a time when money is urgently needed for domestic investments. Now the COVID-19 pandemic makes this discussion more urgent than ever. Multilateral institutions such as the IMF have recently announced sweeping debt relief packages for the continent, with the intention of facilitating governments to address the impact of the pandemic. However, questions remain on whether soliciting debt relief packages for the continent will be enough to sufficiently mitigate the worst effects of the pandemic, and if debt relief is pursued, then how should this be managed and under what conditions? Experts on foreign direct investment, development economics, international finance and macroeconomics will share their analysis of the situation in the face of the current crisis. Mma Amara Ekeruche (@Mmakeruch) is a Research Associate at CSEA. She holds a Masters in Economic Policy from University College London (UCL), United Kingdom and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. Anna Gelpern is a nonresident senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, is professor of law and Agnes N. Williams Research Professor at Georgetown University. Eric LeCompte (@Eric_LeCompte) is an American commentator on politics, finance and religion. He serves on a working group with the UN Conference on Trade and Development. He is the current executive director of Jubilee USA Network. Shirley Yu (@shirleyzeyu) is Senior Visiting Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE and an Asia fellow with the Ash Center of Harvard Kennedy School. She has a Ph.D. in political economy from China’s Peking University, and a Master’s degree in Government from Harvard University. She has published three books in Chinese, including On China, by Ambassadors, and the Rise of the RMB and the Fall of the Yen. She also served as mentor for Cherie Blair’s Foundation for International Women. David Luke (@DavidLukeTrade) is coordinator of the African Trade Policy Centre at the UN Economic Commission for Africa with the rank of a director at the Commission. He is responsible for leading ECA's research, policy advisory services, training and capacity development on inclusive trade policies and in particular the boosting intra-African trade and the continental free trade area initiatives. Prior to joining ECA in 2014, he served as UNDP trade policy adviser in Southern Africa and Geneva and also as Senior Economist and Chief of Trade at the Organization for African Unity/African Union Commission, and as an Associate Professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada. Tim Allen is the inaugural Director of the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, and is a Professor in Development Anthropology in the Department of International Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa. The Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre connects social sciences disciplines and works in partnership with Africa to bring African voices to global debates. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Slides A copy of Mma Amara Ekeruche's PowerPoint presentation is available for download: Debt Relief and Africa During COVID-19: the global response. Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download from Debt Relief and Africa During COVID-19: the global response. A video of this event is available to watch at Debt Relief and Africa During COVID-19: the global response. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Policies to Fight the Pandemic in Latin America and the Caribbean
Jul 07 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Eric Parrado Herrera, Dr Victoria Nuguer, Dr Andrew Powell, Professor Andrés Velasco, Brian Wynter | The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, is taking a huge toll across the world, and governments in Latin America and the Caribbean are taking aggressive measures to save lives. Within a matter of weeks, the macroeconomic outlook for the region has changed dramatically. Financing costs have risen, commodities fallen, and large losses of GDP now seem unavoidable. However, the self-imposed partial closure of the economy is anything but a normal recession, and typical countercyclical demand management, both fiscal and monetary, is likely to be inconducive. Introduced by LSE Director Dame Minouche Shafik, a panel from the IDB and LSE will discuss the 2020 Latin American and Caribbean Macroeconomic Report and its diagnosis of a rapidly changing environment and policy recommendations aimed to bring relief, maintain economic stability, and keep the core of the economy intact. Eric Parrado Herrera is Chief Economist and General Manager of the Research Department of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) since March 2019. Before joining the IDB, he was a professor of economics and finance at the ESE Business School of the Universidad de los Andes in Santiago, Chile. Victoria Nuguer is a Senior Researcher in the Inter-American Development Bank’s Research Department. She holds a Ph.D. from École Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne in Switzerland and a bachelor’s degree from the Universidad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. Andrew Powell (@AndyPowell_IDB) is the Principal Advisor in the Research Department (RES) at the Inter-American Development Bank. He holds a Ba, MPhil. and DPhil. (PhD) from the University of Oxford, was Lecturer at Queen Mary’s College, London and at the University of Warwick, was Chief Economist of the Central Bank of the Republic of Argentina and Professor at the Universidad Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the School of Public Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2017-18 he was a member of the G20 Eminent Persons Group. During 2015-16 he co-chaired the Global Panel on the Future of the Multilateral Lending Institutions. In 2013-16 he was a member of the Global Oceans Commission. Brian Wynter is a company director and consultant. A proud graduate of LSE and Columbia University’s SIPA with financial markets experience in the private sector and the IMF’s Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre, he was the founding CEO of Jamaica’s Financial Services Commission and, most recently, Governor of Jamaica’s central bank. Gareth Jones is Director of the Latin America and Caribbean Centre at LSE. He is Professor of Urban Geography in the Department of Geography and Environment at LSE and an Associate Member of the International Inequalities Institute. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Malcolm Geere, Inter-American Development Bank Executive Director for the United Kingdom will also speak at the beginning of the event. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@lse_lacc) is the focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Impact: reshaping capitalism to drive real change
Jul 06 2020 58 mins  
Contributor(s): Sir Ronald Cohen | Envision a world that moves in only one direction: forward. A world where inequality is shrinking. Where natural resources are regenerated, and people can unlock their full potential and benefit from shared prosperity. A world focused not only on minimizing harm, but on doing measurable good. Join us for this talk by Sir Ronald Cohen about his new book, Impact: Reshaping Capitalism to Drive Real Change. Ronald Cohen (@sirronniecohen) is a philanthropist, venture capitalist, private equity investor, and social innovator, who is driving forward the global Impact Revolution. For nearly two decades, his initiatives have catalyzed global efforts to drive private capital to serve social and environmental good. He serves as Chairman of the Global Steering Group for Impact Investment and The Portland Trust. He is a co-founder of Social Finance UK, USA, and Israel; and co-founder Chair of Bridges Fund Management and former co-founding Chair of Big Society Capital. He chaired the G8 Social Impact Investment Taskforce (2013-2015), the UK Social Investment Task Force (2000-2010) and the UK’s Commission on Unclaimed Assets (2005-2007). You can order the book, Impact: Reshaping Capitalism to Drive Real Change, from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Orders from Pages can only be delivered to UK addresses. Viewers who are not based in the UK can order the book here. Nava Ashraf (@profnavaashraf) is Professor in the Department of Economics and Research Director at the Marshall Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). As the Research Director she leads the Marshall Institute’s effort to imbue private action for the public good with the science that illuminates how to maximise its impact. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit through research, teaching and convening. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEImpactRevolution Podcasts and Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from Impact: reshaping capitalism to drive real change. A video of this event is available to watch at Impact: reshaping capitalism to drive real change. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Strategic Climate Litigation: insights from global experience
Jul 03 2020 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Irum Ahsan, Michael Burger, Lord Carnwath, Dr Joana Setzer, James Thornton | Climate litigation has been used as a strategic tool to advance climate policy goals for at least three decades. As the number of cases addressing the causes and consequences of climate change and the public interest in such litigation has increased, so has public interest in such litigation. Today, climate litigation is widely considered to be a governance mechanism to address climate change. In this webinar, a panel of experts and practitioners will discuss the extent to which climate change litigation is driving governments to adopt more ambitious climate policies and inducing a change of behaviour among major GHG emitting corporations. The panel will also explore potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on future litigation cases. Irum Ahsan is Principal Counsel, Law and Policy Reform in the Office of the General Counsel at the Asian Development Bank. Michael Burger (@ProfBurger) is Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University. Robert Carnwath is a former Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Assistant Professorial Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE. James Thornton (@JamesThorntonCE) is Chief Executive Officer of ClientEarth and Visiting Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University. Robert Falkner (@robert_falkner) is Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation

Closing plenary: Living with COVID-19 – What leadership do we need?
Jul 02 2020 123 mins  
Contributor(s): Valeria Gontareva, Khalid Janahi, Vali R. Nasr, Lindiwe Mazibuko, Professor Andrés Velasco | Building on insights from the thematic and geographic sessions, the Maryam Student Leaders will challenge the panel of policymakers, academics and business representatives on the transformative policy solutions needed globally. Together they will chart a path towards evidence-based and accountable leadership - the kind of leadership which will enable and accelerate a sustainable and inclusive recovery in all regions of the world. Valeria Gontareva served as the Governor of the National Bank of Ukraine in 2014-2017. She was the first woman to lead Ukraine’s central bank and oversaw vital reforms to implement a new monetary policy of inflation targeting and flexible exchange rate regime, to clean up Ukraine’s banking sector, strengthen regulatory supervision, and ensure the independence of the National Bank. Khalid Janahi is currently Chairman of Vision 3, with a focus on venture and infrastructure. He holds 38 years experience in banking and financial services, including serving as Group CEO of Dar Al-Maal Al-Islami Trust, Chairman of Faisal Private Bank, Ithmaar Bank and Solidarity Co. He also served as Vice Chairman of Arab Business Council of the World Economic Forum and is currently on various boards. Vali R. Nasr (@vali_nasr) is the Majid Khadduri Professor of International Affairs and Middle East Studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of various books, including The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy in Retreat, plus numerous articles in scholarly journals. He has advised senior American policy makers, world leaders, and businesses including the President, Secretary of State, senior members of the Congress, and presidential campaigns, and has written for New York Times, Foreign Affairs, Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. Lindiwe Mazibuko (@LindiMazibuko) is the Co-founder and Executive Director of the Apolitical Foundation. She has served as Former Shadow Deputy Minister for Communications, Shadow Minister for Rural Development and Land Reform and Parliamentary Leader and Leader of the Official Opposition in South Africa. She is a Mason and JFK Fellow at Harvard. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. Stephen Dunbar-Johnson is the president, International of The New York Times Company. Dunbar-Johnson is responsible for the oversight and strategic development of the Times Company’s international businesses. Dunbar-Johnson was appointed president, International for The New York Times Company in October 2013 to lead the global expansion of the company. Professor Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) became the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) in 2015. Previously he was the Chief Economist and Special Adviser to the President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). Prior to joining the EBRD in 2006, Erik Berglof held the position of Director of the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics (SITE) and Professor at the Stockholm School of Economics and a Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. Caroline Mei is the Student Leader for this session. She is currently completing her Masters in Public Administration at LSE. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. This event is part of the Maryam Forum Launch: "From Rulership to Leadership: Early Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic".

Opening plenary: Defeating COVID-19 everywhere – What needs to be done NOW?
Jul 02 2020 92 mins  
Contributor(s): María Antonieta Alva, Rt. Hon. Gordon Brown, Jeremy Farrar, Dame Minouche Shafik, Zhu Min, Professor Andrés Velasco | The opening plenary will bring leading policy makers together to take stock of the immense challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has created around the world, and the global response so far. While the G20 has adopted a Global Action Plan, and international financial institutions have taken steps to mitigate the twin health and economic crises, much remains to be done. This session will explore the policy steps to be taken now to save lives and livelihoods and bring about a sustained recovery. Maria Antonieta Alva (@ToniAlvaL) is the Minister of Economy and Finance of Peru since October 2019. She has been working in Peru’s public administration for 10 years. In 2017, she was appointed General Director of Public Budget at the Ministry of Economy and Finance, where she conducted Peru’s public budget, and the formulation of the Public Budget Acts of 2018 and 2019. Between 2014 and 2017, she was the Chief of Strategic Planning and Budget at the Ministry of Education. Previously, she worked at the General Directorate of Public Investment and the General Directorate of Public Budget at the Ministry of Economy and Finance. María Antonieta Alva holds a Master’s in Public Administration in International Development (MPA/ID) from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government (USA), and a BA in Economics from Universidad del Pacífico (Peru). Rt. Hon. Gordon Brown (@OfficeGSBrown) is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He is Chair of the Global Strategic Infrastructure Initiative of the World Economic Forum and also serves as Distinguished Global Leader in Residence of New York University. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010. Previously, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1997 to 2007, making him the longest-serving Chancellor in modern history. Gordon has a PhD in History from the University of Edinburgh. Jeremy Farrar (@JeremyFarrar) is the Director of the Wellcome Trust. Before joining Wellcome in October 2013, Jeremy Farrar was Director of the Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Viet Nam for 18 years. His research interests were infectious diseases and global health, with a focus on emerging infections. He has published almost 600 articles, mentored many dozens of students and fellows, and served as Chair on several advisory boards for governments and global organisations. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences UK, the National Academies USA, the European Molecular Biology Organisation and a Fellow of The Royal Society. Jeremy was knighted in the Queen’s 2019 New Year Honours for services to global health. Professor Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. He was the Minister of Finance in Chile between 2006 and 2010 and has held professorial roles at the Harvard Kennedy School and Columbia University´s School of International and Public Affairs. He was president of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA) from 2005 to 2007. In February 2006 he received the Award for Excellence in Research from the Inter-American Development Bank. In 2013-16 he was a member of the Global Oceans Commission and during 2015-16 he co-chaired the Global Panel on the Future of the Multilateral Lending Institutions. In 2017-18 he was a member of the G20 Eminent Persons Group. He is the author of nearly one hundred academic articles, several academic books and two novels. He has served as a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and to governments, central banks and private businesses around the world. Minouche Shafik is the Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. An economist by training, she became the youngest vice-president in the history of the World Bank at the age of 36. Minouche returned to the UK in 2004 and rose to become the Permanent Secretary of the Department for International Development where she was responsible for the UK’s development assistance efforts around the world. She joined the IMF in 2011 as Deputy Managing Director with responsibility for many of the crisis countries in the Eurozone and the Arab countries in transition. From 2014-2017 she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, responsible for a balance sheet of almost £475 billion, and sat on all of the Bank’s major policy committees. She was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 2015. Zhu Min is currently the Chair of the National Institute of Financial Research at the PBC School of Finance, Tsinghua University. He was formerly a Deputy Managing Director at the IMF from July 2011 to July 2016. Before that, he was a Deputy Governor of the People’s Bank of China. Prior to his service at China’s central bank, he held various positions at the Bank of China where he served as Group Executive Vice president. Dr. Zhu also worked at the World Bank and taught economics at both Johns Hopkins University and Fudan University. Dr. Zhu received his Ph.D and M.A. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, an M.P.A. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public International Affairs at Princeton University, and a B.A. in economics from Fudan University. Moderator: Professor Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) became the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) in 2015. Previously he was the Chief Economist and Special Adviser to the President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). Prior to joining the EBRD in 2006, Erik Berglof held the position of Director of the Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics (SITE) and Professor at the Stockholm School of Economics and a Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. In 2017-2018 he served on the Secretariat of the G20 Eminent Persons Group on Global Financial Governance and on the Governing Board of the Institute for New Economic Thinking in New York. He is a Research Fellow and former Programme Director at the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London. Co-moderator: Piroska Nagy-Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is a macroeconomist and Programme Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) at LSE, where she is responsible for various global policy initiatives on financial resilience, growth and migration. She was Policy Director of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), overseeing strategic directions in Emerging Europe, Central Asia and North Africa as well as major policy initiatives. She was also responsible for the EBRD’s economic forecast and co-created and co-led the Vienna Initiative in 2008-15, a public-private crisis management and coordination platform in emerging Europe, and headed its Secretariat. Piroska worked in senior positions for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) between 1986 and 2008 with surveillance, policy advice and program responsibilities in Europe, Africa and Asia. Caroline Mei is the Student Leader for this session. She is currently completing her Masters in Public Administration at LSE. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. This event is part of the Maryam Forum Launch: "From Rulership to Leadership: Early Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic". View the full programme here. The Maryam Forum is a new multi-year platform aiming to encourage the shift towards evidence-informed, transparent, accountable and inclusive leadership. Introduced on the global stage in Davos during the World Economic Forum (WEF) in January 2020, Maryam Forum is a collaboration between policy makers, academics, business leaders and media that engages the LSE across departments and disciplines. Together with our students – the leaders of tomorrow – we will convene Maryam Co-Labs, leading up to our first annual Global Conference in December. From climate change, health crises and other global emergencies, to industrial policy, populism and migration, these year-round working groups will tackle the most urgent challenges of our time - providing opportunities to exchange expertise and shape solutions, and unlocking the potential for inclusive and sustainable leadership across all regions of the world.


COVID-19: the impact on the UK's ethnic minority populations
Jul 01 2020 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Kehinde Andrews, Dr Miqdad Asaria, Professor Lucinda Platt, Ross Warwick, Professor Heidi Mirza | There is increasing concern that people from ethnic minority backgrounds are being disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 in England. Over the first few weeks of the pandemic there were several anecdotal reports to suggest that there are many more cases of, hospitalisations for, and deaths due to COVID-19 than we would expect from minorities’ population shares. Drawing on new IFS research, the panel will discuss the reasons why mortality is disproportionately high for minority groups, present evidence on how some minority groups are disproportionately affected by the economic impacts of the lockdown, and recommend ways forward to limit further differential social and economic consequences. Kehinde Andrews (@kehinde_andrews) is Professor of Black Studies at Birmingham City University. Kehinde is an academic, activist and author whose books include Back to Black: Retelling Black Radicalism for the 21st Century. His first book was Resisting Racism: Race, Inequality and the Black Supplementary School Movement. Miqdad Asaria (@miqedup) is a health economist with extensive experience in both academic and policy making settings. His research interests include health inequalities and health financing. His research in the COVID-19 space relates to the disproportionate effect among the BAME community. Lucinda Platt (@PlattLucinda) is Professor of Social Policy and Sociology in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research focuses on inequalities, particularly those relating to ethnicity and migration, gender and disability, and she has published widely in those areas. She is a panel member of the IFS Deaton Inequality Review. Ross Warwick is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) and is contributing to the IFS Deaton Inequality Review. He joined the IFS in 2016 and works in the Centre for Tax Analysis in Developing Countries. Heidi Safia Mirza (@HeidiMirza) is Emeritus Professor of Equalities Studies, UCL Institute of Education and Visiting Professor of Race, Faith and Culture at Goldsmith’s College, University of London. She is known for her pioneering intersectional research on race, gender and identity in education. A daughter of the Windrush generation and one of the first women of colour professors in Britain, Heidi is a leading voice in the global debate on decolonisation and co-edited the flagship book, ‘Dismantling Race in Higher Education: Racism, whiteness and decolonising the academy’. She is currently co-authoring ‘Race and Ethnicity’ for the IFS Deaton Inequality Review which includes the impact of COVID-19 on Black and minority ethnic communities. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Health Policy and the Department of Social Policy. The Department of Health Policy (@LSEHealthPolicy) trains and inspires people passionate about health by advancing and challenging their understanding of health systems and the social, economic and political contexts in which they operate. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcasts and Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from COVID-19: the impact on the UK's ethnic minority populations. A video of this event is available to watch at COVID-19: the impact on the UK's ethnic minority populations. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Humankind: a hopeful history
Jul 01 2020 60 mins  
Contributor(s): Rutger Bregman | It's a belief that unites the left and right, psychologists and philosophers, writers and historians. It drives the headlines and the laws that touch our lives. Human beings, we're taught, are by nature selfish and governed by self-interest. In his new book, which he will talk about at this event, Rutger Bregman shows us that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. By thinking the worst of others, we bring out the worst in our politics and economics too. Rutger Bregman (@rcbregman) is a historian and author. He has published five books on history, philosophy, and economics. His book Utopia for Realists was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated in 32 languages. Bregman has twice been nominated for the prestigious European Press Prize for his work at The Correspondent. His new book is Humankind: A Hopeful History. Dr. Poornima Paidipaty is an LSE Fellow in Inequalities. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University. Her work examines the intersections of decolonisation, governance and modern social science. She helped lead and organize the Measures of Inequality project at Cambridge University, which explores how metrics and statistical frameworks have been central to our historical and political understanding of equality and fairness. Prior to the LSE, Dr. Paidipaty was the Philomathia Fellow in History at Cambridge and a member of the Society of Fellows at the University of Chicago. You can order the book, Humankind: A Hopeful History, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHumankind Podcasts and Videos A video of this event is available to watch at Humankind: a hopeful history. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Governments in the Crisis: what do we expect of them? what do they expect of us?
Jun 30 2020 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor George Gerapetritis, Professor Bo Rothstein, Professor Amy Verdun | From strict lockdowns and school shutdowns to fostering self-responsibility, governments have taken different paths to fight the pandemic. Some of these differences seem consistent with different national traditions or cultural frames. Yet, governments have also achieved very different results in managing the pandemic that contradict images of government performance. What should we make of this? Are our stereotypes wrong? At the same time, the economic impact of the pandemic seems to be transforming assumptions about fiscal discipline and the role of the state in the economy. Are we converging around a new activism for the state? Are we sharing a paradigmatic shift? Are north-south differences in Europe disappearing? What should we expect of our governments now? George Gerapetritis is the Minister of State, Hellenic Republic. He is a Professor of Constitutional Law at the Faculty of Law of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He studied in Athens (LL.B.), Edinburgh (LL.M.) and Oxford (D.Phil), has been a visiting fellow at the University of Oxford and the Hellenic Observatory, LSE. He has taught European and comparative constitutional law and history in many universities worldwide. He has published 8 books and more than 100 articles in 3 languages. Bo Rothstein holds the August Röhss Chair in Political Science at University of Gothenburg and is the co-founder of the Quality of Government (QoG) Institute at this department. Rothstein took his PhD in Political Science at Lund University (1986). Prior to the above appointment he worked a researcher at the Department of Government at Uppsala University. During 2016 and 2017 he served as Professor of Government and Public Policy at University of Oxford. Amy Verdun (@Amy_Verdun) is Professor in European Politics and Political Economy, Leiden University. Prior to this appointment she was for 21 years in the Department of Political Science of the University of Victoria (UVic), BC Canada where she was Full Professor since 2005. At UVic she served as Founder and Director of the European Studies Program (1997-2005); Graduate Advisor (2007-2009); and as Chair (Head) of the Department (2010-2013). Her research deals with European integration, governance and policy-making, political economy, as well as comparisons between the EU and Canada. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics in the European Institute at LSE, where he is also Director of the Hellenic Observatory. He has held visiting positions at the University of Minnesota; New York University; Harvard University; and, the European University Institute (Firenze). Before LSE, he held academic posts at the Universities of Stirling and Bradford. This event in the series has been organised by the Hellenic Observatory. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 1 July on COVID-19: the impact on the UK's ethnic minority populations. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 A copy of Professor Amy Verdun's PowerPoint presentation is available for download: Governments in the Crisis: what do we expect from them? what do they expect from us?

Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading?
Jun 30 2020 85 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Dr Meredith Crowley, Dr Adam Marshall, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Tony Travers | This expert panel will assess where we are with the negotiations and where we might be heading. Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Meredith Crowley (@MeredithCrowle1) is a Reader in International Economics at the University of Cambridge, a Senior Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe (UKCE) and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR - London). Adam Marshall (@BCCAdam) is Director General of British Chambers of Commerce. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading?
Jun 30 2020 85 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Dr Meredith Crowley, Dr Adam Marshall, Professor Anand Menon, Professor Tony Travers | In the context of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the negotiations for the UK’s future relationship with the EU look even more challenging. This expert panel will assess where we are with the negotiations and where we might be heading. Our speakers will comprise a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College at the University of Cambridge. Meredith Crowley (@MeredithCrowle1) is a Reader in International Economics at the University of Cambridge, a Senior Fellow at the UK in a Changing Europe (UKCE) and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR - London). Adam Marshall (@BCCAdam) is Director General of British Chambers of Commerce. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute and the School of Public Policy. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 30 June on Governments in the Crisis: what do we expect of them? what do they expect of us? This event is also part of the LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download from Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading?. A video of this event is available to watch at Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading?. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Financing the SDGs – Can the World Avoid Failure?
Jun 29 2020 74 mins  
Contributor(s): Sir Suma Chakrabarti, Amina J. Mohammed | The Addis Agenda that provided a new global framework for financing sustainable development and a process to deliver our 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is now five years old. The world was off track to deliver the SDGs before the COVID-19 crisis but the savage economic impact of coronavirus has set those long-term objectives back further. The SDGs are more important than ever - how do we re-inject momentum into the Addis Agenda and create a sustainable and resilient world? Join us for a conversation with EBRD President Sir Suma Chakrabarti and UN Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed, hosted by LSE Director Minouche Shafik. Suma Chakrabarti (@ebrdsuma) is the sixth President of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). Sir Suma has served two terms as President, having been elected to the posts by the EBRD’s Board of Governors in 2012 and again in 2016. Before becoming President of the EBRD, Sir Suma had a career in the United Kingdom civil service and was Permanent Secretary at the Department for International Development (2002-2007) and the Ministry of Justice (2007-2012). Sir Suma’s earlier career was in international development, starting as a ODI Fellow in Botswana in the early 1980s, and encompassing a range of economic and administrative posts in the Overseas Development Administration (DFID’s predecessor) in London and in the UK office at the World Bank and IMF. Amina J. Mohammed (@AminaJMohammed) is the Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations and Chair of the United Nations Sustainable Development Group. Prior to her appointment, Ms. Mohammed served as Minister of Environment of the Federal Republic of Nigeria where she steered the country’s efforts on climate action and efforts to protect the natural environment. Ms. Mohammed first joined the United Nations in 2012 as Special Adviser to former Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon with the responsibility for post-2015 development planning. She led the process that resulted in global agreement around the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the creation of the Sustainable Development Goals. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESDGs Podcasts & Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from Financing the SDGs - Can the World Avoid Failure? A video of this event is available to watch at Financing the SDGs - Can the World Avoid Failure? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Implications of COVID-19 in the Western Balkans
Jun 29 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Arjan Gjonça,, Dr Mario Holzner, Dr Sanja Vico | What are the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic in the Western Balkans? What economic, social and democracy issues have arisen from the pandemic? What are the challenges that lie ahead? The panel will explore how the countries of the region have been tackling this crisis and how they have responded to the challenges in terms of internal policies and their relations with other countries, particularly the EU. Arjan Gjonça is an Associate Professor of Demography at the Department of International Development. He holds an MSc and a PhD in Demography from LSE and continues to work at LSE as a full member of academic staff. His teaching focuses on demographic methods and on global population health. Arjan started his career as an assistant professor at University of Tirana, Faculty of Economics, Albania. His work experience includes institutions such as Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research; University of Southampton, Department of Social Statistics; University of Bocconi, Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy (as visiting professor), Department of Social Policy at London School of Economics, and finally Department of International Development. Arjan has acted as an adviser to different international organisations and national governments, including the World Bank, UNFPA, UNDP, Albanian Government, Turkish Government and Bosnian Government. His recent contribution includes chairing the Commission on the Reform of Higher Education in Albania (2013-2015), which has resulted in the introduction of new legislation on higher education in the country. Since 2015 he holds the position of Chair of the Accreditation Board of Albania. Mario Holzner (@MarioHolzner) is Executive Director at wiiw. He is also coordinating economic policy development and communication with a focus on European economic policy. He has recently worked on issues of infrastructure investment in greater Europe, proposing a European Silk Road. Mario Holzner is also a lecturer in applied econometrics at the University of Vienna, Department of Economics. He obtained his PhD in economics at the Vienna University of Economics and Business in 2005. Sanja Vico (@sanja_vico) is a Research Officer at European Institute at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and an Associate of the LSEE – South Eastern Europe Research Unit at the LSE. She holds an ERC-funded Postdoctoral Research position in Political Science at the LSE on the project Justice Interactions and Peacebuilding. She received her PhD in Media and Communications from Goldsmiths, University of London in 2019, an MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BSc from the Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Belgrade. Prior to joining the LSE European Institute, she worked as an Associate Lecturer at the Department of Media, Communications and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Studies of Global Media and Democracy at Goldsmiths. She also worked as a Research Consultant and Analyst on various projects related to media and politics in the Western Balkans, including at BBC Media Action which led to the launch of BBC New service in Belgrade in 2018. Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in three areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He has significant policy engagement on all three areas, including appointments in Experts Committees (e.g., on Regional Incentives policy and on Minimum Wage policy in Greece) and work with international bodies such as the European Commission (DG Regio, DG EMPL, DG EAC), the CEFTA Secretariat and the EBRD. He has published widely in economics and regional science journals, including Oxford Economic Papers, the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of Regional Science, Regional Studies, Urban Studies, and others; while he has co-authored a number of policy reports and edited books. He is Director of the LSE Research Unit on South Eastern Europe and holds affiliations with LSE’s Department of Geography and Environment and the Hellenic Observatory. He is Co-Editor of Spatial Economic Analysis, Committee Member of the British and Irish Section of the Regional Science Association, and member in various professional bodies. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by LSEE Research on South Eastern Europe. Over the last several years LSEE (@LSEE_LSE) has developed the School's expertise on South East Europe, drawing on the strength of existing and new academic expertise at the LSE. Bringing together and further developing the School's expertise on South Eastern Europe, LSEE provides a significant platform on which to build high quality, independent research and facilitate public dialogue, while disseminating information on the region. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcasts and Videos A podcast of this event is available to download from Implications of COVID-19 in the Western Balkans. A video of this event is available to watch at Implications of COVID-19 in the Western Balkans. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Life After COVID-19: challenges and policy response
Jun 26 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Michelle Bachelet, Helen Clark, Matteo Renzi, Kevin Rudd, Dame Minouche Shafik | Michelle Bachelet (@mbachelet) is the current United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Ms Bachelet was elected President of Chile on two occasions (2006–2010 and 2014–2018). She was the first female president of Chile. She also served as Health Minister (2000-2002) as well as Chile’s and Latin America’s first female Defence Minister (2002–2004). Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. Matteo Renzi (@matteorenzi) has been the Senator of the electoral college of Florence since 2018. In his political experience he has served as Prime Minister of Italy from February 2014 to December 2016 and as Mayor of Florence from June 2009 to February 2014. Kevin Rudd (@MrKRudd) served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister (2007-2010, 2013) and as Foreign Minister (2010-2012). He led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis—the only major developed economy not to go into recession—and helped found the G20. Mr. Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York as its inaugural President in January 2015. Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will introduce the event. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.


Religious Communities under COVID-19: the first pandemic of the postsecular age?
Jun 25 2020 95 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Azza M. Karam, Elizabeth Oldfield, Dr James Walters | Faith communities have been prominent in public discourse since the beginning of the pandemic. Religious gatherings have been identified as a major sites of transmission raising tensions in many countries between believers and the secular authorities seeking to regulate them. But many people are also searching for meaning and faith groups have adapted to online worship and support to meet the need for hope and connection in the face of suffering and isolation. The pandemic seems to be fanning the flames of some existing religious tensions. But there are also new opportunities for a positive role for faith in the public sphere. How will COVID-19 reshape the religious landscape in the future? Azza M. Karam (@Mansoura1968) is Secretary General of Religions for Peace International; Professor of religion and development at the Vrije Universiteit, and lead facilitator for the United Nations’ Strategic Learning Exchanges on Religion, Development and Diplomacy. Former senior advisor on culture at the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA); coordinator/chair of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Religion and Development; senior policy research advisor at the United Nations Development Program in the Regional Bureau for Arab States; and president of the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations. Elizabeth Oldfield is Director of Theos. She appears regularly in the media, including BBC One, Sky News, the World Service, and writing in The Financial Times. She is a regular conference speaker and chair. Before joining Theos in August 2011, Elizabeth worked for BBC TV and radio. She has an MA in Theology from King’s College London James Walters (@LSEChaplain) is the founding director of the LSE Faith Centre and its Religion and Global Society Research Unit. He leads the team in the centre’s mission to promote religious literacy and interfaith leadership through student programmes and global engagement, along with research into the role of religion in world affairs. He is a Senior Lecturer in Practice in the Department of International Relations and an affiliated faculty member at the Department for International Development. Katerina Dalacoura is Associate Professor in International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2015-16, she was British Academy Mid-Career Fellow and in 2016-19 she participated in a project on the ‘Middle East and North Africa Regional Architecture’, sponsored by the European Commission under the auspices of Horizon 2020 (2016-19). This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of International Relations. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 30 June on Negotiating Our Post-Brexit Future: where are we heading? The Department of International Relations is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download at Religious Communities under COVID-19: the first pandemic of the postsecular age? A video of this event is available to watch at Religious Communities under COVID-19: the first pandemic of the postsecular age? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Peace and the Pandemic
Jun 24 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Helen Clark, Helena Puig Larrauri, Dr Mareike Schomerus | What are the consequences of the pandemic for countries affected by conflict and fragility? Will coronavirus contribute to the further escalation or new outbreaks of conflict? How can the international community –governments, international organisations, regional actors and civil society develop a peace-building response to COVID-19? Helen Clark, head of the United Nations Development Programme 2009-2017, and former Prime Minister of New Zealand leads an expert panel to discuss the development and security risks of the current pandemic. Helen Clark (@HelenClarkNZ) is a global leader on sustainable development, gender equality and international co-operation. She served three successive terms as Prime Minister of New Zealand between 1999 and 2008. While in government, she led policy debate on a wide range of economic, social, environmental and cultural issues, including sustainability and climate change. She then became the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator for two terms from 2009 to 2017, the first woman to lead the organisation. She was also the Chair of the United Nations Development Group, a committee consisting of the Heads of all UN funds, programmes and departments working on development issues. In 2019 Helen Clark became patron of The Helen Clark Foundation. She is an active member of many global organisations. Helena Puig Larrauri (@HelenaPuigL) is a Co-founder and Director of Build Up, a non-profit that works to identify and apply innovative practices to prevent conflict and tackle polarization. She is a governance and peacebuilding professional with over a decade of experience advising and supporting UN agencies, multi-lateral organisations and NGOs working in conflict contexts and polarized environments. She specializes in the integration of digital technology and innovation processes to peace processes, and has written extensively on this subject matter. She is also an Ashoka Fellow. Helena holds a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University and a Masters in Public Policy (Economics) from Princeton University. Mareike Schomerus is Vice President of the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics in Nairobi. Prior to that she was the Director of Programme Politics and Governance and the Research Director of the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) at odi in London. She is a widely published researcher with a body of work on violent conflict, political contestation and peace processes in South Sudan and Uganda and across borders, as well as behavioural insights in post-conflict recovery. She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science and Master’s Degrees from Columbia University and the University of Bremen. Mary Martin is Director of the UN Business and Human Security Initiative at LSE IDEAS. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by LSE IDEAS. The next event in this series will take place at 3pm on 24 June on Europe's New Authoritarianism? COVID-19 And The Challenges Facing Democracy. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download at Peace and the Pandemic. A video of this event is available to watch at Peace and the Pandemic. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

The New Authoritarianism: COVID-19 and the challenges facing democracy
Jun 24 2020 96 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Guy Aitchison, Dr Luke Cooper, Dr Nadine El-Enany, Professor Shalini Randeria | The ‘authoritarian wave’ has touched most continents and regions. So even before the crisis unleashed by Coronavirus many peoples across the world were resisting rising authoritarianism, nationalism and racism. Coronavirus has often been talked of as a historical rupture, igniting system change. ‘We will not go back’ to the pre-crisis world is the clarion call of the current moment. Yet, the nature of the new world being born is still far from certain. And while opportunities for progressive political change undoubtedly exist, this new historical conjuncture provides considerable opportunities for the further embedding of authoritarianism and new attacks on democracy. Warning of these dangers a new report, Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism, co-authored by Dr Guy Aitchison and Dr Luke Cooper, surveys the rise of anti-democratic forces and assesses their reaction to these extraordinary recent developments. Moving between the global picture and British domestic politics, the report argues that a new state-dependent capitalism is coalescing in response to the crisis and it ‘fits’ all too organically with the agenda of the authoritarian populists. Guy Aitchison (@GuyAitchison) is Lecturer in Politics and International Studies at Loughborough University and a co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Luke Cooper (@lukecooper100) is a consultant researcher in the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit and co-author of Covid-19 and the new authoritarianism (LSE CCS, 2020). Nadine El-Enany (@NadineElEnany) is Senior Lecturer in Law and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Race and Law at Birkbeck Law School. She is author of (B)ordering Britain: law, race and empire. Shalini Randeria (@IWM_Vienna) is the Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences (IWM) in Vienna, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, and the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. Mary Kaldor (@KaldorM) is the Director of the LSE Conflict and Civil Society Research unit. Her most recent book is Global Security Cultures. Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit (@LSE_CCS) - Understanding conflict and violence in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Bridging the gap between citizens and policymakers. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Implications of the COVID-19 Crisis for Disability Policy
Jun 23 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Baroness Campbell, Neil Crowther, Clenton Farquharson, Liz Sayce | There has been a shift in many countries over recent decades to position disability policy as an issue of rights and equality: the aim is social and economic participation, rather than a more paternalistic concern for care and containment. This found its expression in the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ratified by 181 countries by 2020. Some states, for instance Australia, have responded to the COVID-19 crisis by creating plans framed precisely in terms of disabled people’s rights to equal treatment (equality in healthcare, employment and the like). Others, like the UK, have reverted to an older framing of ‘vulnerable’ people, those deemed to require protection and practical assistance: this has met with some objections, from over-70s arguing they are contributors to society not just in need of ‘protection’ and from disabled people denied goods like help with shopping if they are not ‘vulnerable’ enough. A number of organisations have looked at the possible ‘new normals’ that could arise post-covid crisis and NESTA has pulled together projections from different sources under a number of themes. Jane Campbell (@BnsJaneCampbell) is an independent Crossbench Member of the House of Lords and disability rights campaigner. She became nationally recognised in the early 90s when she took over the leadership of the British Council of Disabled People from 1991-1995, during the national campaign for disability antidiscrimination legislation. Neil Crowther (@neilmcrowther) is an independent expert on equality, human rights and social change with a particular interest in working to secure the rights of disabled people. Prior to becoming a freelance consultant, Neil was a senior Director at the Equality and Human Rights Commission and before that Head of Policy at the Disability Rights Commission. Clenton Farquharson (@ClentonF), MBE, is a disabled person with lived experience of health and social care, Chair of the Think Local Act Personal partnership board, and member of the Coalition for Collaborative Care. Clenton is also a member of the NHS Assembly, set up to oversee the NHS Ten Year Plan, the current chair of Quality Matters, a trustee of the Race Equality Foundation, ambassador for Disability Rights UK. Liz Sayce (@lizsayce) is a JRF Practitioner Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. Liz was Chief Executive of Disability Rights UK (and its legacy charity Radar) from 2007-2017, where she led work for equal participation for all, through programmes on independent living, career opportunities and shifts in cultural attitudes and behaviour. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, democracy, development, and social transformation. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy
Jun 22 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Wolfgang Münchau, Vicky Pryce | What will be the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Brexit? More particularly, how might it affect the strategy and interests of the UK as it negotiates a longer-term relationship with the EU27? What if the timelines change? This panel of experts will consider different scenarios for what might happen and what they might mean. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Wolfgang Münchau (@EuroBriefing) is Director of Eurointelligence and a columnist for the Financial Times. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute and the School of Public Policy. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 22 June on COVID-19 in South Asia: Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download from Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy. A video of this event is available to watch at Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

COVID-19 in South Asia: Bangladesh, India and Pakistan
Jun 22 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Tania Aidrus, Yamini Aiyar, Professor Jishnu Das, Professor Mushfiq Mobarak | This podcast will explore how governments in South Asia are tackling COVID-19 and will focus specifically on Bangladesh, India and Pakistan. South Asia is home to a quarter of humanity and its policy response to COVID-19 matters for the world but there are markedly different views on the policy response in South Asia. The panelists will discuss what can be learned from the South Asian experience and the challenges that lie ahead for the region. Tania Aidrus (@taidrus) is Special Assistant to the Prime Minister, Digital Pakistan. Yamini Aiyar (@AiyarYamini) is President and Chief Executive of the Centre for Policy Research (CPR), New Delhi. Yamini is a TED fellow and a founding member of the International Experts Panel of the Open Government Partnership. Jishnu Das is Professor at the McCourt School of Public Policy and the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Jishnu’s work focuses on health and education in low and middle-income countries, with an emphasis on social markets, or common, but complex, conflagrations of public and private education and health providers operating in a small geographical space. Mushfiq Mobarak (@mushfiq_econ) is Professor of Economics at Yale University with concurrent appointments in the School of Management and in the Department of Economics. Mobarak is the founder and faculty director of the Yale Research Initiative on Innovation and Scale (Y-RISE). Adnan Khan (@adnanqk) is Professor in Practice at LSE's School of Public Policy. Before joining the School of Public Policy and STICERD, Professor Khan served as Research and Policy Director at the International Growth Centre at the LSE for ten years. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The International Growth Centre (@The_IGC) aims to promote sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. The South Asia Centre (@SAsiaLSE) harnesses LSE's research & academic focus on Afghanistan, Bhutan, Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Financing the Post-COVID-19 Recovery
Jun 19 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Simeon Djankov, Anne-Laure Kiechel, Professor Ugo Panizza, Dr Jeromin Zettelmeyer | This panel will discuss the ways in which advanced economies as well as emerging markets can create the fiscal space to boost post-COVID-19 recovery prospects. While some countries are still in the midst of the COVID-19 health crisis, others are starting on their way to economic recovery. Recovery after such a tremendous shock will be painful and expensive. There is still enormous uncertainty both on the health front, as well as on the economic front. Policies in both directions require significant new budget allocations. Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Co-Director for Policy and Research Fellow at the Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was Chief Economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank. Anne-Laure Kiechel (@alkiechel) totals more than 20 years of experience in debt/capital markets and Sovereign Advisory, at both government and SOE level. In 2019, she founded Global Sovereign Advisory (“GSA”). In 2009, she joined Rothschild in Paris, working in the Financial Advisory group. She became Partner in 2014 and initiated Rothschild Sovereign Advisory, a practice she co-created and developed before being appointed Global Head. She started her career at Lehman Brothers in 1999, working in several departments in New York, London, and Paris. She headed Lehman Brothers Debts Capital Markets practices for France and Benelux and co-headed Lehman’s Global Finance practice. Ugo Panizza (@upanizza) is Professor of Economics and Pictet Chair in Finance and Development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. He is also the Director of the International Center for Monetary and Banking Studies (ICMB), Editor in Chief of International Development Policy and Deputy Director of the Center for Finance and Development. He is a Vice President and Fellow of CEPR, and Fellow of the Fondazione Einaudi. Before joining the Graduate Institute, he was Chief of the Debt and Finance Analysis Unit at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and a Senior Economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He also worked at the World Bank and taught at the American University of Beirut and the University of Torino. Jeromin Zettelmeyer (@jzettelmeyer) rejoined the IMF as Deputy Director in the Strategy, Policy and Review Department in August 2019. He was previously Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, Director-General for Economic Policy at the German Ministry for Economic Affairs (2014-2016), Director of Research and Deputy Chief Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (2008–2014) and IMF staff member (1994–2008). He is a CEPR research fellow and a member of CESIfo, and led CEPR’s Research and Policy Network on European Economic Architecture during 2018-19. He has published in major economics journals and is co-author of Debt Defaults and Lessons from a Decade of Crises, a study of sovereign debt crises during the 1990s and 2000s. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Financial Markets Group, School of Public Policy, and the Institute of Global Affairs. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 22 June on Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy. The Financial Markets Group Research Centre (@FMG_LSE) was established in 1987 at the LSE. The FMG is a leading centre in Europe for policy research into financial markets. It is the focal point of the LSE's research communication with the business, policy making and international finance communities. The FMG works alongside the Department of Finance to understand problems in financial markets and in the decision-making processes of corporations, banks and regulators. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download from Financing the Post-COVID-19 Recovery. A video of this event is available to watch at Financing the Post-COVID-19 Recovery. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Financing the Post-COVID-19 Recovery
Jun 19 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Simeon Djankov, Anne-Laure Kiechel, Professor Ugo Panizza, Dr Jeromin Zettelmeyer | While some countries are still in the midst of the COVID-19 health crisis, others are starting on their way to economic recovery. Recovery after such a tremendous shock will be painful and expensive. There is still enormous uncertainty both on the health front, as well as on the economic front. Policies in both directions require significant new budget allocations. Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Co-Director for Policy and Research Fellow at the Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was Chief Economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank. Anne-Laure Kiechel (@alkiechel) totals more than 20 years of experience in debt/capital markets and Sovereign Advisory, at both government and SOE level. In 2019, she founded Global Sovereign Advisory (“GSA”). In 2009, she joined Rothschild in Paris, working in the Financial Advisory group. She became Partner in 2014 and initiated Rothschild Sovereign Advisory, a practice she co-created and developed before being appointed Global Head. She started her career at Lehman Brothers in 1999, working in several departments in New York, London, and Paris. She headed Lehman Brothers Debts Capital Markets practices for France and Benelux and co-headed Lehman’s Global Finance practice. Ugo Panizza (@upanizza) is Professor of Economics and Pictet Chair in Finance and Development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. He is also the Director of the International Center for Monetary and Banking Studies (ICMB), Editor in Chief of International Development Policy and Deputy Director of the Center for Finance and Development. He is a Vice President and Fellow of CEPR, and Fellow of the Fondazione Einaudi. Before joining the Graduate Institute, he was Chief of the Debt and Finance Analysis Unit at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and a Senior Economist at the Inter-American Development Bank. He also worked at the World Bank and taught at the American University of Beirut and the University of Torino. Jeromin Zettelmeyer (@jzettelmeyer) rejoined the IMF as Deputy Director in the Strategy, Policy and Review Department in August 2019. He was previously Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, Director-General for Economic Policy at the German Ministry for Economic Affairs (2014-2016), Director of Research and Deputy Chief Economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (2008–2014) and IMF staff member (1994–2008). He is a CEPR research fellow and a member of CESIfo, and led CEPR’s Research and Policy Network on European Economic Architecture during 2018-19. He has published in major economics journals and is co-author of Debt Defaults and Lessons from a Decade of Crises, a study of sovereign debt crises during the 1990s and 2000s. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Financial Markets Group, School of Public Policy, and the Institute of Global Affairs. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 22 June on Brexit and the Post-COVID-19 Options for the Economy. The Financial Markets Group Research Centre (@FMG_LSE) was established in 1987 at the LSE. The FMG is a leading centre in Europe for policy research into financial markets. It is the focal point of the LSE's research communication with the business, policy making and international finance communities. The FMG works alongside the Department of Finance to understand problems in financial markets and in the decision-making processes of corporations, banks and regulators. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19



Good Economics for Hard Times
Jun 17 2020 55 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Abhijit Banerjee, Professor Esther Duflo | Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s latest book Good Economics for Hard Times, which they will discuss in this talk, makes the case for how economics can help us solve the toughest problems in some of the poorest places in the world. Based on a body of work that was awarded the Nobel in economics sciences, the book offers hope and practical solutions for a world without poverty. Abhijit Banerjee is the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2003 he co-founded the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) with Esther Duflo. Abhijit is the author of a large number of articles and four books, including Good Economics for Hard Times, co-authored with Esther Duflo. Banerjee has served on the U.N. Secretary-General’s High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. He is a co-recipient of the 2019 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for his ground breaking work in development economics research. You can order the book, Good Economics for Hard Times, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer). Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is Director of STICERD and Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair of Economics. The Morishima lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMorishimaLecture

The Economics of Belonging: a radical plan to win back the left behind and achieve prosperity for all
Jun 17 2020 61 mins  
Contributor(s): Martin Sandbu | As the coronavirus crisis shows, the western social contract is threadbare. In his new book The Economics of Belonging, which he will talk about in this online event, Martin Sandbu traces the economic roots of polarisation, showing that globalisation has been wrongly blamed. He proposes a programme of "centrists radicalism" that can restore an economy that works for everyone while maintaining international openness. Martin Sandbu (@MESandbu) is the Financial Times's European Economics Commentator. He also writes Free Lunch, the FT's weekly newsletter on the global economic policy debate. He has been writing for the FT since 2009, when he joined the paper as Economics Leader Writer. Before joining the FT, he worked in academia and policy consulting. He has taught and carried out research at Harvard, Columbia and the Wharton School, and has advised governments and NGOs on natural resources and economic development. He is the author of three books, on business ethics, the euro, and on "the economics of belonging". He was educated at the universities of Oxford and Harvard. Alan Manning (@alanmanning4) is professor of economics at the London School of Economics. He was chair of the UK Migration Advisory Committee until earlier this year. His expertise is on labour markets including, but not confined to, the impact of migration. You can order the book, The Economics of Belonging: A Radical Plan to Win Back the Left Behind and Achieve Prosperity for All, (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching.

The Political Scar of Epidemics
Jun 17 2020 93 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Chris Anderson, Professor Barry Eichengreen, Dr Anna Getmansky, Dr Cevat Giray Aksoy, Dr Orkun Saka | Epidemics pose a stress test for governments. Political officials and institutions face the challenge of assembling information and mounting effective interventions against a rapidly spreading and potentially catastrophic disease. They must communicate that information, describe their policies, and, importantly, convince the public of their trustworthiness. If they fail, they may create long-lasting scars in the minds of their citizens, especially on the young generation. This panel will discuss what the political and economic legacy of COVID-19 may be, and how it may shape the public attitude toward political leaders, governments and democracies in the long-term. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE's European Institute. Barry Eichengreen (@B_Eichengreen) is George C. Pardee and Helen N. Pardee Professor of Economics and Political Science at University of California, Berkeley. Anna Getmansky (@anna_getmansky) is Assistant Professor of International Relations in the Department of International Relations at LSE. Cevat Giray Aksoy (@cevatgirayaksoy) is a Principal Economist in the Office of the Chief Economist at European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London, and a Research Fellow at LSE's Institute of Global Affairs. Orkun Saka (@orknsk) is an Assistant Professor in Finance at the University of Sussex and a Visiting Fellow at LSE's European Institute. Paul De Grauwe (@pdegrauwe) is John Paulson Chair in European Political Economy at the LSE European Institute.

COVID-19: the health policy and care response
Jun 16 2020 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Miqdad Asaria, Dr José-Luis Fernandez, Professor Alistair McGuire, Dr Clare Wenham | The UK has long been a global leader in preparing for pandemics. However, the COVID-19 crisis has exposed weaknesses in Britain’s public health strategies. Academic experts from LSE’s Department of Health Policy in the fields of pandemic response, social care and health inequalities will consider pandemic response from a number of different angles, comparing responses across international health systems and decision-making and suggesting what the next steps should be for the UK and internationally. Miqdad Asaria (@miqedup) is a health economist with extensive experience in both academic and policy making settings. His research interests include health inequalities and health financing. His research in the COVID-19 space relates to the disproportionate effect among the BAME community. José-Luis Fernandez (@joselele) is Director of the Care Policy and Evaluation Centre, LSE. A health and social care economist, José Luis specialises in ageing-related policies, the interaction between health and social care, and the economic evaluation of health and social care systems and services. He is pioneering resources to support community and institutional long-term care responses to COVID-19. Alistair McGuire is Chair of Health Economics in the Department of Health Policy. His research interests cover all topics in health economics, including international comparisons, economics of the hospital, public/private sector interface and cost-effectiveness analysis of health technologies.

Crucial Role of State Capacity in Crisis Response
Jun 16 2020 65 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Adnan Khan, Professor Margaret Levi | The event will explore how state capacities underpin the effectiveness of government interventions in different countries in response to the COVID-19 crisis. It will also discuss what can be learned from this and the challenges that lied ahead drawing on insights from economics and political science. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Adnan Khan (@adnanqk) is Professor in Practice at LSE's School of Public Policy. Before joining the School of Public Policy and STICERD, Professor Khan served as Research and Policy Director at the International Growth Centre at the LSE for ten years. During 2018-19, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Margaret Levi (@margaretlevi) is the Sara Miller McCune Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Professor of Political Science, and Senior Fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director at the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE School of Public Policy and Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by LSE's Department of Economics, Institute of Global Affairs, School of Public Policy and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Standford University. The next event in this series will take place at 6pm on 17 June on The Political Scar of Epidemics. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE, is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. CASBS @ Stanford (@CASBSStanford) brings together deep thinkers from diverse disciplines and communities to advance understanding of the full range of human beliefs, behaviours, interactions, and institutions. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Race and Policing in America
Jun 16 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Nicola Lacey, Professor Tracey L. Meares, Professor Tim Newburn, Dr Coretta Phillips | Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy at LSE. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics. Tracey L. Meares (@mearest) is the Walton Hale Hamilton Professor and a Founding Director of the Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School. Before joining the faculty at Yale, she was a professor at the University of Chicago Law School from 1995 to 2007, serving as Max Pam Professor and Director of the Center for Studies in Criminal Justice. Tim Newburn (@TimNewburn) has been Professor of Criminology and Social Policy at the LSE since 2002. He was Head of Department of Social Policy from 2010-13 and Director of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology from 2003-2009. Prior to joining LSE he was Joseph Rowntree Professor of Urban Social Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London and Director of the Public Policy Research Unit (1997-2002). He has also worked at the University of Leicester (1982-85), the Home Office Research & Planning Unit (1985-90), the National Institute for Social Work (1990-92) and the Policy Studies Institute (1992-97). Coretta Phillips is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy and is a member of the Mannheim Centre for Criminology. Her research interests lie in the field of race, ethnicity, crime, criminal justice and social policy. Coretta's most recent book, The Multicultural Prison jointly won the Criminology Book Prize in 2013 and it was shortlisted for the BBC Radio 4 Thinking Allowed/British Sociological Association Award for Ethnography in 2014. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSPolicing

How Much Tax Do The Rich Really Pay And Could They Pay More?
Jun 15 2020 65 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Arun Advani, Emma Agyemang, Ed Conway, Helen Miller, Andy Summers | With tax rises now almost surely on the horizon, the question will be who should pay. The rich, it is often claimed, already contribute a large share of tax revenues; there's not much scope for them to pay more. For example, the top 1% already pay 29% of all income tax. But is this because they pay a lot of their income in tax, or just because they have a lot of income? Researchers from LSE and Warwick will present new findings using confidential tax data to reveal the taxes actually paid by the UK's top 1%. They explore the gap between headline tax rates and the rates that the richest really pay, taking into account income from all sources as well as deductions and tax reliefs. The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion of the implications for taxing the rich after coronavirus. How much revenue could be raised from the top 1%? What are the alternatives and trade-offs involved? Is it fair to ask the rich to pay more at a time of national crisis? When is the right time to raise taxes on the rich, and how? Arun Advani (@arunadvaniecon) is Assistant Professor of Economics and Impact Director of the CAGE Research Centre at the University of Warwick. He is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and a Visiting Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute. He studies issues of tax compliance and tax design, with a particular focus on those with high incomes or wealth. Emma Agyemang (@EmmaAgyemang) is a journalist at the Financial Times covering tax, investment and personal finance issues. She joined the Financial Times in 2018 after previously working as a personal finance writer at the Investors Chronicle. In 2019, Emma won Business Journalist of the Year at the Words by Women award for her coverage of the "loan charge", a government crackdown on tax avoidance that was implicated in several suicides. Before becoming a journalist, Emma spent a decade working in diverse organisations from archives, museums and think tanks to local government and charities. Helen Miller (@HelenMiller_IFS) is Deputy Director of the IFS and head of the Tax sector. She is chair of the Royal Economic Society’s Communications Committee. Her main research interests are the effects of the tax system on individuals and firms behaviour and the design of tax policy. Her recent research also includes work on the drivers of firm investment and the UK productivity puzzle. Andy Summers (@Summers_AD) is an Assistant Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and an Associate of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. His teaching and research focuses on tax law and policy, particularly the taxation of wealth. His work also investigates the measurement of inequality using tax data. Ed Conway (@EdConwaySky) is economics editor at Sky News, covering major UK and international economics, business and political stories. He has broken a series of exclusive reports on the banking and financial crisis. He is also economics columnist for The Times, and has been one of the longest-running economics editors in UK journalism, having started covering the sector in 2003. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics, where he is also Director of the International Inequalities Institute, one of the world’s premier centres for research and teaching focusing on the contemporary challenge of inequality. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download from How Much Tax Do The Rich Really Pay And Could They Pay More? A video of this event is available to watch at How Much Tax Do The Rich Really Pay And Could They Pay More? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.


Six Political Philosophies in Search of a Virus: critical perspectives on the coronavirus pandemic
Jun 15 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Gerard Delanty Dr Sonja Avlijaš, Dr Sonja Avlijaš | For this year’s Annual LEQS Lecture, Gerard Delanty discusses six philosophical responses to the crisis that can give us perspective on these questions. Gerard Delanty is Professor of Sociology and Social & Political Thought at the University of Sussex, Brighton. Sonja Avlijaš (@sonjaavlijas) is Research Associate at Sciences Po, Paris and Institute for Economic Sciences, Belgrade and an alumna of LSE. Cristóbal Garibay-Petersen is Fellow in European Philosophy in the European Institute at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute and LSE “Europe in Question” (LEQS) Discussion Paper Series. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 16 June on COVID-19: the health policy and care response. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. The event will be based on the LEQS Discussion Paper by Professor Gerard Delanty. 'Six political philosophies in search of a virus: Critical perspectives on the coronavirus pandemic', which is free to download from the LEQS Website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Financial Strains, Health Pressures: Syria, Somalia and the COVID-19 impact
Jun 10 2020 82 mins  
Contributor(s): Khalif Abdirahman, Mazen Gharibah, Dr Nisar Majid, Dr Rim Turkmani, Professor Alex de Waal | Khalif Abdirahman is Senior Field Researcher on LSEs - Conflict Research Programme - Somalia. He has conducted research across the Somali regions for the last seven years including for Tufts University, the Rift Valley Institute and the Overseas Development Institute. Mazen Gharibah is the Research Manager at the Governance and Development Research Centre in Beirut, Lebanon, which partners with the CRP-Syria Team. Nisar Majid is Research Director for CRP in Somalia. Rim Turkmani (@Rim_Turkmani) is a Senior Research Fellow in the LSE CCS Unit and the Research Director for CRP work in Syria. Alex de Waal is Director of the World Peace Foundation and Programme Research Director of the CRP. He also contributes to CPAID research at the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa. He is an expert on Sudan, South Sudan and the Horn of Africa with particular reference to humanitarian crisis and response, conflict, mediation and peacebuilding. He has served with the African Union mediation team on Darfur and as an advisor to the African Union High Level Implementation Panel for Sudan. Jessica Watkins (@jesterwatkins) is Research Officer at the Middle East Centre and works on the CRP. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit. The next event in this series will take place at 1pm on 15 June on Six Political Philosophies in Search of a Virus: critical perspectives on the coronavirus pandemic. Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit (@LSE_CCS) - Understanding conflict and violence in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. Bridging the gap between citizens and policymakers. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Europe in the Time of Coronavirus: responding to the political and economic challenges of COVID-19
Jun 09 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Chris Anderson, Professor Simon Glendinning, Professor Waltraud Schelkle | Periods of crisis can strip politics back to its most basic forms, and the political reality is laid bare: who, if anyone, has the power to tell other people what to do. While the European Union has a considerable stake in the crisis, particularly in the Eurozone, it is national states which have been the politically primary actors in calling for lockdowns across Europe. Real coercive power still lies, it seems, with Europe’s nations. What repercussions has this reassertion of national political power had on public opinion across Europe? Will it change how Europeans think of themselves and each other? Will it bring us together or push us further apart? And how will the Euro area cope? Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics & Policy at the European Institute at LSE. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Professor in European Philosophy and Head of the European Institute at LSE. Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the European Institute at LSE. Esra Özyürek (@esragozyurek) is Professor in European Anthropology and Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies at the European Institute at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute. The next event in this series will take place at 1pm on 10 June on Financial Strains, Health Pressures: Syria, Somalia and the COVID-19 impact. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Fiscal Policies to Support People and Growth During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Jun 08 2020 93 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Simeon Djankov, Dr W. Raphael Lam, Catherine Pattillo, Dr Mehdi Raissi, Zsoka Koczan | Fiscal policies have been central for providing emergency lifelines to people and firms during the COVID-19 pandemic, and are also at the forefront of facilitating a recovery once the lockdown ends. This online event will focus on how policy makers can support fast and sustainable recovery. It will also consider the role of the “other government”: state-owned enterprises and public banks in supporting the recovery, drawing on the latest IMF Fiscal Monitor. Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Research Fellow, Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank. W. Raphael Lam is a senior economist in the Fiscal Affairs Department of the IMF. His research currently focuses on fiscal issues related to inequality, intergovernmental relations, and fiscal rules. He previously worked on the China and Japan team in the Asia and Pacific Department, and had participated in the IMF’s lending program to Iceland during the global financial crisis. His previous research also covered fiscal and financial sector issues. He holds a Ph.D in Economics from University of California. Catherine Pattillo is Assistant Director in the Fiscal Affairs Department and chief of the Fiscal Policy and Surveillance Division, responsible for the IMF’s Fiscal Monitor. She works on macro-fiscal issues. Since joining the IMF from a position at Oxford University, she has worked in the Research Department and on countries in Africa and the Caribbean, and the Strategy, Policy and Review Department where she worked on low-income country issues, and emerging issues such as gender, inequality, and climate change. She has published widely in these areas. Mehdi Raissi (@mraissi80) is a senior economist in the Fiscal Affairs Department of the IMF. He joined the Fund in 2010 and worked on several multilateral surveillance issues and a range of countries, including Italy, India, and Mexico. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Cambridge. His research interests include macro-econometric modeling, macro-fiscal linkages, and sovereign debt issues. Zsoka Koczan (@ZsokaKoczan) is a Senior Economist at the EBRD’s Office of the Chief Economist, having previously worked in the IMF’s European and Research Departments. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs, the School of Public Policy, the Financial Markets Group Research Centre and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 9 June on Europe in the Time of Coronavirus: responding to the political and economic challenges of COVID-19. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Financial Markets Group Research Centre (@FMG_LSE) is a leading centre in Europe for policy research into financial markets. It is the focal point of the LSE's research communication with the business, policy making and international finance communities. The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) was founded in 1991 to create a new post-Cold War era in central and eastern Europe. We are now doing more than ever before - across three continents - to further progress towards ‘market-oriented economies and the promotion of private and entrepreneurial initiative’. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download at Fiscal Policies to Support People and Growth During the COVID-19 Pandemic. A video of this event is available to watch at Fiscal Policies to Support People and Growth During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Do Morals Matter: presidents and foreign policy from FDR to Trump
Jun 04 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Joseph S. Nye | In his new book, Do Morals Matter?, which he will discuss in this talk, Joseph S. Nye examines the role of ethics in US foreign policy during the post-1945 era. Working through each presidency from FDR to Trump, Nye scores their foreign policy on three ethical dimensions: their intentions, the means they used, and the consequences of their decisions. He evaluates their leadership qualities, elaborating on which approaches work and which ones do not. Joseph S. Nye, Jr. (@Joe_Nye) is University Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus and former Dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He received his bachelor’s degree summa cum laude from Princeton University, won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Harvard. He has served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, Chair of the National Intelligence Council, and a Deputy Under Secretary of State. His most recent books include The Powers to Lead, The Future of Power, Presidential Leadership and the Creation of the American Era, and The Power Game: a Washington Novel. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the British Academy, and the American Academy of Diplomacy. In a recent survey of international relations scholars, he was ranked as the most influential scholar on American foreign policy, and in 2011, Foreign Policy named him one of the top 100 Global Thinkers. You can order the book, Do Morals Matter? (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.

Post COVID-19 Futures of the Urbanising World
Jun 03 2020 92 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Creighton Connolly, Professor Roger Keil, Dr Deirdre McKay, Dr Rita Padawangi | What is the relationship between urbanisation and infectious disease? How do cities and their hinterlands respond to the COVID-19 pandemic? What is the role of civil society in tackling the livelihood challenges in urban and rural areas during the pandemic? This panel will explore the impact of COVID-19 on changing relationships between cities and their hinterlands in global urbanisation processes, and the position of cities, small towns and rural areas in thinking about post COVID-19 urban futures, with particular emphasis on Southeast Asia. Creighton Connolly (@Creighton88) is Senior Lecturer in Development Studies and the Global South in the School of Geography at the University of Lincoln. He researches urban political ecology, urban-environmental governance and processes of urbanization and urban redevelopment in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Malaysia and Singapore. He is editor of Post-Politics and Civil Society in Asian Cities, and has published in a range of leading urban studies and geography journals. Roger Keil (@rkeil) is Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. He researches global suburbanization, urban political ecology, cities and infectious disease, and regional governance. Keil is the author of Suburban Planet and editor of Suburban Constellations. A co-founder of the International Network for Urban Research and Action (INURA), he was the inaugural director of the CITY Institute at York University and former co-editor of the International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. Deirdre McKay (@dccmckay) is Reader in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University, and Chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Studies UK (ASEAS UK). Dr McKay’s research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalisation and development. Her fieldwork is in areas of the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's major cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Rita Padawangi (@ritapd) is Senior Lecturer at Singapore University of Social Sciences. Her research interests include the sociology of architecture, social movements and participatory urban development. She co-coordinates the Southeast Asia Neighbourhoods Network (SEANNET), an initiative for urban studies research and teaching, funded by the Henry Luce Foundation through the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS). She is the editor of the Routledge Handbook of Urbanization in Southeast Asia. Hyun Bang Shin (@urbancommune) is Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre, and Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre (@LSESEAC) is a multidisciplinary Research Centre of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It develops and fosters academic and policy-oriented research, drawing on a rich network of experts across disciplines at LSE and beyond, while serving as a globally recognised hub for promoting dialogue and engagement with Southeast Asia and the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

COVID-19 and Illicit Markets
Jun 02 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Naomi Burke-Shyne, Jason Eligh, Gabriel Feltran, Kasia Malinowska, Alexander Söderholm | The potential impact of COVID-19 on economic markets is well known and widely discussed. But what about the markets we know less about, namely illicit markets? Drug markets, policymakers and people who use drugs are facing an unprecedented situation. Join this discussion - a blend of on-the-ground narratives and broader policy perspectives - to hear how we might best respond. Naomi Burke-Shyne (@NaomiSBS) is the Executive Director of Harm Reduction International. She has more than 10 years of international experience at the intersection of harm reduction, HIV and human rights. She is a member of the Strategic Advisory Group to the UN on HIV and Drug Use, a member of the Global Fund Technical Review Panel for Human Rights and Gender, and a member of the World Health Organization Guidelines Group on 'Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances'. Jason Eligh (@JasonEligh) is a Senior Expert at the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime. He is an illicit drug market and policy analyst who has researched, developed and led technical cooperation and assistance initiatives addressing illicit drugs across African and Asian geographies. His current work focuses on understanding the contexts and characteristics influencing drug use behaviours and the structural resilience of drug trade environments, particularly as these factors relate to the development and sustainability of harm. Gabriel Feltran is a professor in the Department of Sociology at the Federal University of São Carlos in Brazil, and currently Senior Researcher at the Brazilian Centre for Planning and Analysis (CEBRAP). His current research looks at criminal groups and illegal markets in Brazil, focussing on collective action, marginalized groups and "the criminal world" in São Paulo. Kasia Malinowska (@OSFKasia) is the director of the Global Drug Policy Program at the Open Society Foundations. She previously led the Open Society’s International Harm Reduction Development program, which supports the health and human rights of people who use drugs. She publishes regularly on drug policy as it relates to women, social justice, health, human rights, civil society, and governance, and she co-authored Poland’s first National AIDS program and has helped formulate policy in international organisations. Alexander Söderholm (@AlexSoderholm) is the Policy Coordinator of the LSE International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU), and the Managing Editor of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development. He is currently a PhD Candidate in Social Policy at the LSE with a research project titled 'Drugs, Livelihoods, and Development: The Role of Illicit Markets in Determining Development Outcomes'. He has also worked with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in Iran and has conducted research and policy work in a number of countries, such as Thailand, Myanmar, South Africa, Colombia, and Brazil, on issues related to illicit markets and sustainable development. John Collins (@JCollinsIDPU) is Executive Director of the LSE’s International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU), a Fellow of the LSE US Centre and a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Yale Centre for the Study of Globalization. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Illicit Economies and Development (JIED), an Open Access journal published by LSE Press.



COVID-19 Economic Response: a comparative, cross-border perspective
May 29 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Reuben Abraham, Dr Ailish Campbell, Rain Newton-Smith, Kazumi Nishikawa | This panel will compare and contrast the economic policy response to COVID-19 undertaken by countries around the world in both developed and emerging economies. It will explore the immediate impact on supply-chains and the outlook for trade and cross-border investment from here. Reuben Abraham (@nebuer42) is CEO of IDFC Foundation and IDFC Institute, a Mumbai based think/do tank focused on state capability and political economy issues. He is a non-resident scholar at the Marron Institute at New York University, and a senior fellow at the Milken Institute in Singapore. In addition, he is a Senior Advisor to Swiss Re and an Honorary Advisor to the New Zealand government at the New Zealand Asia Foundation. Ailish Campbell (@Ailish_Campbell) joined Global Affairs Canada as the Chief Trade Commissioner of Canada and Assistant Deputy Minister in March 2017. She leads a global team that helps Canadian business find new customers, troubleshoot market access, sell their products, and grow their businesses. Ailish also leads work across global trade support services including export finance, foreign investment and responsible business conduct. Previously, she held senior executive positions at Finance Canada, the Business Council of Canada and the Privy Council Office. Ailish began her career in the Canadian federal public service as a trade negotiator on the Doha Round of WTO negotiations. She holds a Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Oxford and is designated as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Rain Newton-Smith (@RainNewtonSmith) is the Chief Economist at the Confederation of British Industry. She and her team provide business leaders with advice on the UK economic outlook and global risks. Previously, Rain was head of Emerging Markets at Oxford Economics where she managed a large team of economists and was the lead expert on China. Prior to that, Rain worked on the international forecast for the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England and also led a team with responsibility for developing a risk assessment framework for the UK financial system. Kazumi Nishikawa is Principal Director of Healthcare Industries Division, METI (Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry) of Japan. He is a member of the Global Future Council for Human Enhancement and Longevity, World Economic Forum. Mr Nishikawa has also worked in the Defence Ministry and Cabinet Office. He holds a law degree from the University of Tokyo, an LLM from Northwestern University School of Law, and an LLM in International Studies from Georgetown University Law Center. He is an attorney at Law in New York State, USA. Lutfey Siddiqi (@Lutfeys) is a Visiting Professor-in-Practice at LSE IDEAS, a member of LSE Court and the Advisory Board of LSE Systemic Risk Centre. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the National University of Singapore (Risk Management Institute), and advisory board member of NUS Centre for Governance (CGIO). This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

COVID-19 Economic Response: a comparative, cross-border perspective
May 29 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Reuben Abraham, Dr Ailish Campbell, Rain Newton-Smith, Kazumi Nishikawa | This panel will compare and contrast the economic policy response to COVID-19 undertaken by countries around the world in both developed and emerging economies. It will explore the immediate impact on supply-chains and the outlook for trade and cross-border investment from here. Reuben Abraham (@nebuer42) is CEO of IDFC Foundation and IDFC Institute, a Mumbai based think/do tank focused on state capability and political economy issues. He is a non-resident scholar at the Marron Institute at New York University, and a senior fellow at the Milken Institute in Singapore. In addition, he is a Senior Advisor to Swiss Re and an Honorary Advisor to the New Zealand government at the New Zealand Asia Foundation. Ailish Campbell (@Ailish_Campbell) joined Global Affairs Canada as the Chief Trade Commissioner of Canada and Assistant Deputy Minister in March 2017. She leads a global team that helps Canadian business find new customers, troubleshoot market access, sell their products, and grow their businesses. Ailish also leads work across global trade support services including export finance, foreign investment and responsible business conduct. Previously, she held senior executive positions at Finance Canada, the Business Council of Canada and the Privy Council Office. Ailish began her career in the Canadian federal public service as a trade negotiator on the Doha Round of WTO negotiations. She holds a Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Oxford and is designated as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Rain Newton-Smith (@RainNewtonSmith) is the Chief Economist at the Confederation of British Industry. She and her team provide business leaders with advice on the UK economic outlook and global risks. Previously, Rain was head of Emerging Markets at Oxford Economics where she managed a large team of economists and was the lead expert on China. Prior to that, Rain worked on the international forecast for the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England and also led a team with responsibility for developing a risk assessment framework for the UK financial system. Kazumi Nishikawa is Principal Director of Healthcare Industries Division, METI (Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry) of Japan. He is a member of the Global Future Council for Human Enhancement and Longevity, World Economic Forum. Mr Nishikawa has also worked in the Defence Ministry and Cabinet Office. He holds a law degree from the University of Tokyo, an LLM from Northwestern University School of Law, and an LLM in International Studies from Georgetown University Law Center. He is an attorney at Law in New York State, USA. Lutfey Siddiqi (@Lutfeys) is a Visiting Professor-in-Practice at LSE IDEAS, a member of LSE Court and the Advisory Board of LSE Systemic Risk Centre. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the National University of Singapore (Risk Management Institute), and advisory board member of NUS Centre for Governance (CGIO). This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by LSE IDEAS. The next event in this series will take place at 2pm on 1 June on COVID-19 and Africa: pandemics and global politics. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19 Podcast & Video A podcast of this event is available to download at COVID-19 Economic Response: a comparitive, cross-border perspective. A video of this event is available to watch at COVID-19 Economic Response: a comparitive, cross-border perspective. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Capital Flow Cycles: a long global view
May 28 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Carmen M. Reinhart | Join us for the Economica-Phillips Lecture which will be delivered by Carmen M. Reinhart. Carmen M. Reinhart (@carmenmreinhart) is the Minos A. Zombanakis Professor of the International Financial System at Harvard Kennedy School. Carmen has been appointed as the new Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group, a position she will take up on 15 June. Carmen was Senior Policy Advisor and Deputy Director at the International Monetary Fund and Chief Economist the investment bank Bear Stearns in the 1980s. She serves in the Advisory Panel of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and was a member of the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisors. Her work has helped to inform the understanding of financial crises in both advanced economies and emerging markets. Her best-selling book (with Kenneth S. Rogoff) entitled This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly documents the striking similarities of the recurring booms and busts that have characterised financial history. It has been translated to over 20 languages and won the Paul A. Samuelson Award. Based on publications and scholarly citations, Reinhart is ranked among the top economists worldwide according to Research Papers in Economics (RePec). She has been listed among Bloomberg Markets Most Influential 50 in Finance, Foreign Policy’s Top 100 Global Thinkers, and Thompson Reuters' The World's Most Influential Scientific Minds. In 2018 she was awarded the King Juan Carlos Prize in Economics and NABE’s Adam Smith Award, among others. Francesco Caselli is Norman Sosnow Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE.

Data–driven Responses to COVID–19: opportunities and limitations
May 28 2020 76 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Alison Powell, Dr Edgar Whitley | With many activities moving online, there is growing pressure to implement a range of data–driven responses as “obvious” solutions to various COVID–19 concerns. These range from contact tracing to address the spread of the disease, through the use of AI in the dashboards that allocate health resources to identifying and supporting vulnerable individuals. This panel will review the opportunities and limitations of data–driven responses to COVID–19 from a legal, societal and technical perspective, highlighting the risks of exclusion and discrimination that can arise. Seeta Peña Gangadharan is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. She researches data and discrimination and will discuss what data–driven responses all too often leave out including institutional capacity issues and precariously positioned members of society. Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is an Associate Professor and joined LSE Law in September 2012. Orla conducts research in the fields of technology regulation and digital rights, with her primary focus being on EU data protection and privacy law. She will focus on the safeguards offered by data protection and human rights law for the use of data in pandemics and assess the potential and possible limitations of these safeguards. Alison Powell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. She leads the JUST AI initiative in conjunction with the Ada Lovelace Institute and the AHRC. She will reflect on how AI that is ethical, works for the common good and is effectively governed and regulated can operate to address Covid–19 responses, and how issues of vulnerability, solidarity and risk have been reshaped through this crisis. Edgar Whitley is Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems at LSE and is a data governance expert and will speak to the challenges of identifying and supporting vulnerable individuals through data sharing in government. Susan Scott is Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems in the Department of Management. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Addressing the Pandemic: the pharmaceutical challenges
May 26 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Kalipso Chalkidou, Dr Panos Kanavos, Professor Margaret Kyle, Professor Ken Shadlen | The panel will examine a range of issues related to the development and use of vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, including the range of incentives for innovation and national approaches to purchasing, price negotiations, and intellectual property and trade policies. Kalipso Chalkidou (@kchalkidou) is the Director of Global Health Policy and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development. Previously, she was the Director of Global Health and Development Group at the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, helping governments build technical and institutional capacity for improving the value for money of their healthcare investment. She is interested in how local information, local expertise, and local institutions can drive scientific and legitimate healthcare resource allocation decisions whilst improving patient outcomes. She has been involved in the Chinese rural health reform and also in national health reform projects in the USA, India, Colombia, Turkey and the Middle East, working with the World Bank, PAHO, DFID and the Inter-American Development Bank as well as national governments. Between 2008 and 2016 she founded and ran NICE International, a non-profit group within the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Panos Kanavos is Associate Professor of International Health Policy in the Department of Health Policy (LSE), Deputy Director at LSE Health, and Programme Director of the Medical Technology Research Group (MTRG). He is an economist by training, and teaches health economics, pharmaceutical economics and policy, health care financing, health care negotiations, and principles of health technology assessment Margaret Kyle is Chair in Intellectual Property and Markets for Technology at MINES ParisTech. Her research concerns innovation, productivity and competition. She has a number of papers examining R&D productivity in the pharmaceutical industry, specifically the role of geographic and academic spillovers; the firm-specific and policy determinants of the diffusion of new products; generic competition; and the use of markets for technology. Recent work examines the effect of trade and IP policies on the level, location and direction of R&D investment and competition. She also works on issues of innovation and access to therapies in developing countries. Ken Shadlen is Professor of Development Studies and Head of Department in the Department of International Development at LSE. He researches the global politics of intellectual property, with a particular focus on understanding both the drivers of variation in pharmaceutical patent patent systems in developing countries, and the consquences of such variation for biomedical innovation, access to drugs, and health policies. Ernestina Coast is Professor of Health and International Development in the Deptartment of International Development. Her research is multidisciplinary and positioned at an intersection of social science approaches including health, gender and development. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic.

Responding to a Pandemic: the view from Latin America
May 22 2020 104 mins  
Contributor(s): Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Laura Chinchilla, Ricardo Lagos, Juan Manuel Santos, Dr Ernesto Zedillo | Latin America is being hit by the virus and by a number of adverse economic shocks. How can the region’s democracies preserve both lives and livelihoods? What will be the impact on the region’s already low economic growth and high inequality? Five former Latin American heads of state bring their knowledge and experience to bear on these difficult questions. Fernando Henrique Cardoso served two terms as President of Brazil from 1995 to 2002, having previously served as a senator, Minister of Foreign Relations and Minister of Finance. Mr Cardoso has been a member of The Elders since the group was founded in 2007, stepping down from a front line role in 2016. Laura Chinchilla (@Laura_Ch) is a political scientist, who graduated from college at the Universidad de Costa Rica. She also holds a Master in Public Policy from Georgetown University. Her election in 2010 for a four year term as President of the Republic of Costa Rica was preceded by a political career which began with her appointment as Minister of Public Security between 1996 and 1998. Between 2002 and 2006 she was elected member of the National Congress. In 2006 she was elected Vice President of Costa Rica, assuming office as the Ministry of Justice at the same time. Ricardo Lagos is the former President of Chile, who held the office from 2000 to 2006. An economist and lawyer by qualification, he worked as an economist for the United Nations from 1976–1984. In the 1990s, R. Lagos served in Chile under President Aylwin and his successor, President Eduardo Frei, as both Education Minister and Minister of Public Works. Juan Manuel Santos (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Ernesto Zedillo was President of Mexico from 1994 to 2000. Dr. Zedillo’s was named Under-Secretary of Planning and Budget Control in the Secretariat of Budget and Planning in 1987, becoming the Secretary of Economic Programming in 1988. In 1992, Dr. Zedillo was appointed Secretary of Education. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy.




Assessing the Impact of COVID-19: from mortality to misery?
May 21 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Dr Daisy Fancourt, Lord O'Donnell, Professor Carol Propper | In the current crisis, government policies, such as physical distancing, are paying enormous attention to the mortality risks of COVID-19 to the exclusion of the wellbeing hits borne elsewhere (e.g. mental health, loneliness, domestic violence, child welfare, physical health, and addiction). Is this as it should be when lives are at stake? If not, what can be done to ensure that misery is placed on a more equal footing with mortality? Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Daisy Fancourt (@Daisy_Fancourt) is Associate Professor of Psychobiology & Epidemiology and Wellcome Research Fellow in the Psychobiology Group, Department of Behavioural Science & Health at UCL. Daisy studied at Oxford University and King’s College London before completing her PhD in psychoneuroimmunology at UCL. Richard Layard is Emeritus Professor of Economics at LSE. is a labour economist who worked for most of his life on how to reduce unemployment and inequality. He is also one of the first economists to work on happiness, and his main current interest is how better mental health could improve our social and economic life. Gus O'Donnell (@Gus_ODonnell) is chairman of Frontier Economics and the former cabinet secretary and head of the Home Civil Service. Carol Propper is Professor of Economics at Imperial College London. She is an author of an IFS report on the health consequences of responses to COVID-19. Julia Black is currently LSE's Strategic Director of Innovation and a Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science.

Government Assistance to Struggling Businesses in the COVID-19 Crisis
May 19 2020 100 mins  
Contributor(s): Erica Bosio, Dr Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe, Professor Dimitri Vayanos | What has been the initial response of governments during the COVID-19 crisis as regards assistance to businesses? How can firms survive during an extensive period of lockdown? What government programmes show promise? This panel will explore the immediate government actions in the early stages of the health crisis and chart a plausible path to the economic recovery phase. This path includes, inter alia, a standstill on insolvency procedures, credit guarantee programmes for business, faster payments on public procurement projects and a likely corporate debt restructuring scheme. Erica Bosio is the Program Manager of the Growth Analytics unit in the Development Economics Vice Presidency of the World Bank. Her work focuses primarily on public procurement. Between 2012 and 2019, she was a member of the Doing Business team leading the research on contract enforcement and the development of the latest indicator on public procurement. Prior to joining the World Bank Group, Erica worked in the arbitration and litigation department of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton in Milan. She holds a Master of Laws (LL.M.) from Georgetown University and a degree in law from the University of Turin (Italy). Juanita Gonzalez-Uribe is an assistant professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Her research focuses on entrepreneurship, innovation, and private equity. Her work in these areas has been published in top academic journals including the Review of Financial Studies, and the Journal of Financial Economics. Her work has won several prizes including the Juan Fernandez de Araoz Prize for Best Paper in Corporate Finance, the Coller Prize Award, and the Kauffman Dissertation Award. She has also won several research grants including the NBER Innovation Policy Grant and the NBER Entrepreneurship Grant. Juanita earned a PhD in Finance and Economics from Columbia University, and, a Master in Economics and a Bachelor in Economics and Mathematics from Universidade de los Andes (Colombia). Prior to her PhD studies, Juanita worked as a junior researcher at the Central Bank of Colombia. Dimitri Vayanos is Professor of Finance at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he also directs the Financial Markets Group and the Paul Woolley Centre for the Study of Capital Market Dysfunctionality. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, a Director and former Managing Editor of the Review of Economic Studies, a Research Fellow at CEPR and a former Director of its Financial Economics program, a Research Associate at NBER, a former Director of the American Finance Association, and a former Head of LSE's Finance Department. Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Co-Director for Policy and Research Fellow at the Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank.

COVID-19: the economic policy response
May 18 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Adnan Khan, Professor Ricardo Reis, Professor Silvana Tenreyro | This panel will review the challenges that both advanced and developing countries face around the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The virus and the resulting lockdown are a tremendous adverse shock to the economy. Policy must respond to save lives and to prevent lasting damage to livelihoods and productivity. This panel will review the challenges that both advanced and developing countries face, and suggest some feasible ways forward. Adnan Khan (@adnanqk) is Professor in Practice at LSE's School of Public Policy. Before joining the School of Public Policy and STICERD, Professor Khan served as Research and Policy Director at the International Growth Centre at the LSE for ten years. During 2018-19, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Ricardo Reis (@R2Rsquared) is the Arthur Williams Phillips Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Recent honors include the 2016 Bernacer prize for best European economist under the age of 40 working in macroeconomics and finance, and the 2017 Banque de France / Toulouse School of Economics junior prize in monetary economics, finance, and bank supervision for a researcher of any nationality based in Europe. Professor Reis is an academic consultant at the Bank of England and the Federal Reserve system, he directs the ESRC Centre for Macroeconomics in the UK, is a recipient of an ERC grant from the EU, and serves on the council or as an advisor of multiple organisations. Silvana Tenreyro is Professor in Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and an external member of the Monetary Policy Committee at the Bank of England. She obtained her MA and PhD in Economics from Harvard University. Before joining the Bank, she was co-Director and Board member of the Review of Economic Studies and Chair of the Women’s Committee of the Royal Economics Society. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

The Great Reversal in the Time of COVID-19
May 13 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Thomas Philippon, Dr Angelo Martelli | In his new book, which he will talk about at this event, Thomas Philippon argues that many key problems of the American economy are due not to the flaws of capitalism or the inevitabilities of globalisation but to the concentration of corporate power. By lobbying against competition, the biggest firms drive profits higher while depressing wages and limiting opportunities for investment, innovation, and growth. How is COVID-19 affecting these patterns? Thomas Philippon (@ThomasPHI2) is the Max L. Heine Professor of Finance at the Stern School of Business at New York University. His new book is The Great Reversal: How America Gave Up on Free Markets. You can order the book (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney. Angelo Martelli (@angelo_martelli) is Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE. Piroska Nagy Mohacsi (@NagyMohacsi) is Programme Director in the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute, the Institute of Global Affairs and the LSE School of Public Policy. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 18 May on COVID-19: the economic policy response. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Transboundary Crisis Management in Europe in the Wake of COVID-19
May 13 2020 93 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Arjen Boin, Dr Lydie Cabane, Professor Martin Lodge, Professor Nick Sitter | COVID-19 represents a critical transboundary crisis: it knows no territorial boundaries, and it fundamentally challenges the boundaries of state action. Many national responses to the pandemic have caused transboundary crises in themselves. Given this fundamental challenge, what are the emerging lessons for political crisis leadership? What can we say about the resilience of liberal democratic political systems? And what lessons can be drawn for multi-level crisis management? This event brings together leading experts to consider lessons for political leadership in crisis, the future nature of multi-level crisis management in Europe as well as the wider challenges presented by the pandemic for the legitimacy of liberal democratic political systems. Arjen Boin (@arjenboin) is Professor of Public Institutions and Governance at the Institute of Political Science, Leiden University. Professor Boin is a leading expert in crisis management and leadership. Lydie Cabane (@CabaneLydie) is an Assistant Professor in Governance of Crises at the Institute for Security and Global Affairs at Leiden University, with an interdisciplinary background in sociology and political science. Martin Lodge (@MartinLodge) is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy in the Department of Government at LSE and co-director of carr. He also coordinated the TransCrisis project. Nick Sitter (@SitterNick) is Professor of Public Policy at the CEU, Professor of Political Economy at the BI Norwegian Business School, and a Research Associate at LSE's Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation. Nick holds a PhD, MSc and BSc (Econ) from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is a leading authority on populism and democratic backsliding in the EU. Andrea Mennicken (@mennicken) is Associate Professor of Accounting and co-director of carr. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. The Department of Accounting (@LSE_Accounting) is one of the leading groups in the world for teaching and research on the economic, institutional and organisational aspects of accounting and financial management. The Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation (@carr_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research unit, whose core intellectual work focuses on the organisational and institutional settings for risk management and regulatory practices. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Behavioural Science in the Context of Great Uncertainty
May 13 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Nick Chater, Professor Liam Delaney, Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Ulrike Hahn, Dr Grace Lordan | The impacts of COVID-19 and how we deal with them hinge on how politicians, firms and the public respond. What lessons can we learn from behavioural science about how we act in a time of crisis characterised by great uncertainty? What lessons can behavioural science learn about how it can be best placed to provide guidance in an uncertain world? Answers to these questions are crucial to not only mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 but also to dealing better with future crises, not only caused by viruses but also by other shocks. Nick Chater (@NickJChater) is Professor of Behavioural Science, University of Warwick. He is on the advisory board to the Behavioural Insights Team. Liam Delaney (@LiamDelaneyEcon) is Professor of Behavioural Science at University College Dublin and has been advising the Irish Government on its response to COVID-19. He will be joining LSE later this year. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. Ulrike Hahn is Professor of Psychological Science at Birkbeck College. She has been at the forefront of attempts to reconfigure behavioural science to deal with COVID-19. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is Associate Professor in Behavioural Science and the founding Director of The Inclusion Initiative at LSE. Julia Black is currently LSE's Strategic Director of Innovation and a Professor of Law in the Department of Law at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 13 May on Transboundary Crisis Management in Europe in the Wake of COVID-19. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.

Strategic Leadership in the Time of COVID-19
May 11 2020 96 mins  
Contributor(s): David H. Petraeus, Professor Michael Barzelay, Dr Shirley Yu | General Petraeus will develop his model of strategic leadership, developed during a senior military career and as leader of a large government agency, and what it implies for management in the context of a pandemic. David Petraeus is Partner at KKR and Chairman of the KKR Global Institute. General (Ret) David H. Petraeus (New York) joined KKR in June 2013 and is Chairman of the KKR Global Institute, which supports KKR’s investment committees, portfolio companies, and investors with analysis of geopolitical and macro-economic trends, as well as environmental, social, and governance issues. Prior to joining KKR, David Petraeus served over 37 years in the U.S. military, culminating his career with six consecutive commands, five of which were in combat, including command of coalition forces during the Surge in Iraq, command of U.S. Central Command, and command of coalition forces in Afghanistan. Following his service in the military, Gen. Petraeus served as the Director of the CIA. Michael Barzelay is Professor of Public Management in LSE's Department of Management. His book, Preparing for the Future: Strategic Planning in the U.S. Air Force, won the Louis Brownlow Book Award of the US National Academy of Public Administration. A past consultant for many public officials and organisations, his most recent book is Public Management as a Design-Oriented Professional Discipline. Shirley Yu (@shirleyzeyu) is Senior Visiting Fellow in the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE and an Asia fellow with the Ash Center of Harvard Kennedy School. She has a Ph.D. in political economy from China’s Peking University, and a Master’s degree in Government from Harvard University. She has published three books in Chinese, including On China, by Ambassadors, and the Rise of the RMB and the Fall of the Yen. She also serves as a mentor for Cherie Blair’s Foundation for International Women. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director of the Institute of Global Affairs in LSE's School of Public Policy. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. This event in the series has been organised by the Institute of Global Affairs, the Department of Management and the LSE School of Public Policy. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Assessing the Economic Impact of COVID-19
May 07 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Paul de Grauwe, Dr Simeon Djankov, Professor Panos Tsakloglou, Dr Miranda Xafa | What does Europe need to do to recover from the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic? And, what are the implications of the crisis for Greece’s economy, still vulnerable after the debt crisis? This panel will explore the challenges, scenarios and implications of action taken at the European level and how these resonate in terms of domestic strategies in one of the euro-zone’s still most critical economies. What can we expect of the recovery? Paul De Grauwe (@pdegrauwe) is John Paulson Chair in European Political Economy European Institute. Prior to joining LSE, Paul De Grauwe was Professor of International Economics at the University of Leuven, Belgium. He was a member of the Belgian parliament from 1991 to 2003 Simeon Djankov (@SimeonDjankov) is Research Fellow, Financial Markets Group, LSE. He was deputy prime minister and minister of finance of Bulgaria from 2009 to 2013. Prior to his cabinet appointment, Djankov was chief economist of the finance and private sector vice presidency of the World Bank. Panos Tsakloglou is a Professor in the Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece and Visiting Professor at the Hellenic Observatory, LSE. His research focuses on questions related to the redistributive role of the state (inequality, poverty, social exclusion, taxation and transfers in kind) and the labour market. During the period 2012-2014 he was Chairman of the Greek Government’s Council of Economic Advisors and member of the EU Economic and Financial Committee (EFC) and Eurogroup Working Group (EWG) as well as alternate member of Ecofin and Eurogroup. He has also been Social Policy advisor to Prime Ministers G. Papandreou (2010-2011) and L. Papademos (2011-2012) and a member of the EU Economic Policy Committee (EPC, 2010-2011). Miranda Xafa (@MXafa) started her career as an economist at the International Monetary Fund and moved on to senior positions in government and in the financial sector in Athens and London. She served as chief economic advisor to Prime Minister Constantine Mitsotakis in 1991-93 and worked as a market analyst for Salomon Brothers/Citigroup in London for a decade before returning to Washington to serve as a member of the IMF Executive Board in 2004-09. She is currently the CEO of E.F. Consulting Ltd and a senior scholar at the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. Backed by its 179-year participation in the country's economic and social life, NBG is one of the leading Greek financial organisations, with strong tradition and noteworthy contribution to the economic and social transformation of Greece. The Bank’s broad customer base, respected brand name, strong market share in deposits and enhanced capital adequacy ratios secure it with the liquidity needed to finance Greek businesses and reflect the long-standing relationship of trust it enjoys with its clientele.


The Economics of Biodiversity
May 07 2020 54 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta | Humanity has prospered immensely in recent decades, but this has been coupled with profound impacts on biodiversity. This presents significant risks to our economies and way of life, as well as those of future generations. Partha Dasgupta is leading an independent, global review on the Economics of Biodiversity, commissioned by HM Treasury. The final Review will report in the autumn, and ahead of the COP15 international biodiversity summit due to take place in Kunming, China, where new long-term biodiversity targets will be agreed, and ahead of the COP26 climate summit. Minouche Shafik will discuss and explore with Professor Dasgupta the sustainability of humanity’s engagement with nature: what we take from it; how we transform what we take from and return to it; why we have disrupted nature’s processes; and what we must do differently to enhance our collective wealth and wellbeing, and that of our descendants. Partha Dasgupta is a pioneer in the field of environmental economics. He is Frank Ramsey Emeritus Professor of Economics at the University of Cambridge and Chair of the Management Board of its Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. He was named Knight Bachelor by the Queen for services to economics in 1992 and is the recipient of numerous prizes including the Blue Planet Prize (2015) which recognises outstanding contributions to the improvement of the global environment. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBiodiversity


Coronavirus and Brexit: two cases of quarantine?
Apr 30 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Sir Simon Fraser, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Christian Lequesne, Professor Brigid Laffan | How might the coronavirus pandemic affect the post-Brexit negotiations? The UK has set 31 December 2020 as the deadline for negotiating its future relationship with the European Union and, if it wishes to extend that deadline, it must inform Brussels by 30 June 2020. With governments generally struggling to manage the pandemic, with time for little else, that schedule looks even more challenging. But the pandemic is likely to impact the negotiating agenda in key sectors in ways not previously envisaged. So: is the timescale still practicable? And, must we adjust what we need to talk about? This panel will draw together experts on both the process and content of the Brexit negotiations. Simon Fraser (@SimonFraser00) previously served as Permanent Secretary at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and Head of the UK Diplomatic Service from August 2010 to July 2015. He is currently Deputy Chairman of Chatham House and serves as Adviser to the Europe Programme. He is also Managing Partner of Flint Global. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Academic Director at the School of Public Policy, LSE. Christian Lequesne is Professor at the Sciences-Po Centre for International Studies, Paris. He was formerly Sciences Po-LSE Professor at the European Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Brigid Laffan (@BrigidLaffan) is Director of the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies at the European University Institute (EUI), Florence. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. This event is part of LSE's public event series - COVID-19: The Policy Response. COVID-19 represents an enormous challenge for the social sciences to help governments and non-governmental organisations respond to the economic and societal consequences of the pandemic. Part of LSE's response to this challenge is a series of online public events that will take place over the Summer Term. Why not visit the School of Public Policy COVID-19 Resource Centre. This event in the series has been organised by the European Institute and the School of Public Policy. The next event in this series will take place at 4pm on 30 April on COVID-19 and Deglobalisation. This event is also part of the LSE Programme: Brexit and Beyond. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECOVID19

Global Leadership to Support Africa's Response to COVID-19
Apr 29 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Paul Collier, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Minouche Shafik | Speakers discuss the challenges facing African countries and lessons from the Ebola crisis, and explore how countries can best respond to the macro crisis caused by the collapse of natural resource prices and trade, capital flight, and disrupted global supply chains. As COVID-19 continues to spread, the impact to lives and the global economy is increasing at an unprecedented speed and scale. So far, outbreaks have been predominantly addressed at national levels, as governments deal with critical threats to public health systems and domestic economies. However, the pandemic has also revealed the extent of our interconnectedness, with national responses having consequences on neighbouring countries and beyond. Various international organisations, leaders, economists, and health experts have called for global coordinated action to respond to the evolving health and societal crisis wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic – including how to support African countries that are bracing for the worst. To ensure effective global support for the most vulnerable countries, committing resources to and coordinating fiscal, monetary, and anti-protectionist initiatives are needed. Paul Collier is a Director of the IGC and a Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford; Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies; a CEPR Research Fellow; and Professorial Fellow of St Antony’s College, Oxford. He was formerly the senior advisor to Tony Blair’s Commission on Africa, and was Director of the Development Research group at the World Bank for five years. He researches the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid; and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resource-rich societies. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (@MaEllenSirleaf) is a Liberian politician who served as the 24th President of Liberia from 2006 to 2018. Sirleaf was the first elected female head of state in Africa. She is the co-chair of the IGC’s Council on State Fragility. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala (@NOIweala) was Nigeria’s Minister of Finance from 2003 to 2006 and from 2011 to 2015, and Foreign Minister in 2006. She was Managing Director of the World Bank from 2007 to 2011, overseeing South Asia, Europe, Central Asia, and Africa, and is currently Senior Adviser at Lazard, Board Chair of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and a Senior Advisor to the IGC. She is the author of Reforming the Unreformable: Lessons from Nigeria. Jonathan Leape is the Executive Director of the IGC, which he has led since 2013, and Associate Professor of Economics at LSE. Prior to joining the IGC, he was director of the Centre for Research into Economics and Finance in Southern Africa, which was established at LSE in 1990 as an initiative of the Commonwealth Heads of Government to support the democratic transition in South Africa. He has advised a number of African governments, with a focus on tax and regulatory issues, and served as Chief Academic Advisor on Taxation to the UK Government Economic Service.

Now or Never: Crafting the Global COVID-19 Response
Apr 21 2020 81 mins  
Contributor(s): Gordon Brown, Minouche Shafik, Professor Lawrence Summers, Professor Andrés Velasco | This unprecedented global crisis requires an unprecedented global response. The first contours of such a response are slowly emerging, but there are important missing pieces and the speed and scale are not sufficient. Most of the measures taken so far have come from the international financial institutions, with the G20 Leaders slowly catching up. The G20 Finance Ministers meeting and the IMF Spring meetings took place last week and we know have a G20 Action Plan. Regional leaders have also taken steps to address the crisis in their respective regions. This panel will take stock of where we are and what needs to happen in coming months. Rt Hon Gordon Brown, United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Dame Minouche Shafik, Director, London School of Economics and Political Science. Professor Lawrence H. Summers, President Emeritus and Charles W. Eliot University Professor at Harvard University and former US Treasury Secretary and Director, National Economic Council. Professor Andrés Velasco, Dean, LSE School of Public Policy. Professor Erik Berglof, Director, Institute of Global Affairs, LSE School of Public Policy. This event is part of the LSE Series on COVID-19 Crisis Management and Post-Crisis Reconstruction - lessons from the past and early insights from the current crisis



Radical Uncertainty: decision making for an unknowable future
Mar 10 2020 80 mins  
Contributor(s): John Kay, Professor Lord King | Two leading economists discuss decision making in conditions of radical uncertainty, where we can neither imagine all possible outcomes nor assign probabilities to future events. Uncertainty surrounds all the big decisions we make in our lives. How much should we pay into our pensions each month? Should we take regular exercise? Expand the business? Change our strategy? Enter a trade agreement? Take an expensive holiday? We do not know what the future will hold. But we must make decisions anyway. So we crave certainties which cannot exist and invent knowledge we cannot have. But humans are successful because they have adapted to an environment that they understand only imperfectly. Throughout history we have developed a variety of ways of coping with the radical uncertainty that defines our lives. Mervyn King and John Kay, authors of a new book on decision making in conditions of radical uncertainty, will draw on biography, history, mathematics, economics and philosophy to highlight the most successful - and most short-sighted - methods of dealing with an unknowable future. They will argue that contemporary approaches to dealing with uncertainty rely on a false understanding of our power to make predictions, leading to many of the problems we experience today. This event marks the publication of Radical Uncertainty: Decision-making for an unknowable future by Mervyn King and John Kay. To pre-order a copy of this book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Radical Uncertainty: Decision-making for an unknowable future. John Kay is a Fellow of St John's College, Oxford and has held professorial appointments at the University of Oxford, London Business School and LSE. Mervyn King was Governor of the Bank of England from 2003 to 2013 and is currently Professor of Economics and Law at New York University and School Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it.



Imagining our Futures
Mar 07 2020 81 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Simidele Dosekun, Dr Florian Foos, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Ria Ivandic, Dr Kasia Paprocki | If you could do one thing to change the world, what would that be? What do LSE academics think we should start, stop and continue doing? Join us as we explore how people can shape the world with their actions. Simidele Dosekun is Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE. Her research centres African women to explore questions of gender, race, subjectivity, and power in a global context. Her work has appeared in Feminist Media Studies, Feminism and Psychology, Qualitative Inquiry, and Feminist Africa, among others. Florian Foos (@FlorianFoos) is Assistant Professor in Political Behaviour in the Department of Government, LSE. He studies political campaigns using randomized field experiments that he conducts with partner organisations, such as political parties and other campaign organisations. His research aim is to identify the causal effects of formal and informal interactions between citizens, politicians and campaign workers on electoral mobilization, opinion change and political activism. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. He is a sociologist of class and inequality, and his research focuses in particular on the cultural dimensions of contemporary class division. He has recently completed a book entitled The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged (with Daniel Laurison), which examines social mobility into Britain’s higher professional and managerial occupations. Ria Ivandic (@RiaIvandic) is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. She has a Master’s degree in Economics from Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona Graduate School of Economics). Her primary research interests are the economic analysis of electoral politics, media economics and applied microeconometrics. Kasia Paprocki (@KasiaPaprocki) is Assistant Professor in Environment in the Department of Geography and Environment, LSE. Her work addresses issues within and between the study of the political economy of development, political ecology, social movements, and agrarian change. Her research is regionally focused in South Asia, particularly Bangladesh. Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Pro-Director (Research) and Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. He is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. He has published over 100 books and articles and has won several prestigious prizes and fellowships for his research, including from the US-UK Fulbright Commission, the American Political Science Association, and the UK Economic and Social Research Council. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld


Youthquake
Mar 07 2020 77 mins  
Contributor(s): Lola Fayokun, Daniel Lawes, Noga Levy-Rapoport | Youth organisers share their experiences on how to start a campaign whilst testing the audience’s ideas in an interactive workshop that brings together key elements of direct action, political engagement and campaigning. Young people have always driven social justice movements, and have always been on the frontlines of grassroots and nationwide organising. The surge of youth strikers has been a wake-up call for many of today’s youth; that being the digital generation is not a hindrance but can actually help us get involved in organising and changing our world for the better. So how do you start a campaign? Who can help you get organising, and how do you set up your own group? What about when the going gets tough – what keeps you going and how? With Noga Levy-Rapoport, Dan Lawes, Lola Fayokun, and other young activists, this panel will draw together the experiences of current youth organisers whilst testing the audience’s ideas and experiences in an interactive workshop that brings together key elements of direct action and political engagement and campaigning. Lola Fayokun (@femlxla) is an 18-year-old environmental activist and Politics student at LSE. She is heavily involved in the UK Student Climate Network, the grassroots organisation which hosts the youth climate strikes in the UK. Her work here is focused on the decolonisation of the environmental movement and promotion of the Green New Deal. She is a Labour Party volunteer, organising as a Havering & Dagenham Young Labour's Campaigns and Membership officer and as LSESU Labour Society's BAME officer. Daniel Lawes (@LawesDan) is the 18-year-old Founder & CEO of YouthPolitics UK, a national organisation dedicated to encouraging political engagement among young people. The organisation provides free and non-partisan campaigning sessions to help youth in deprived areas develop the skills to enact positive change. He has led the organisation to reach over 14,000 young people by embarking on grassroots initiatives like campaign workshops, talks in school assemblies and collaborations with youth centres with over 55 volunteers working with the organisation. He is also an ambassador of HRH #iWill Campaign and an active campaigner for increased funding to youth mental health services. Noga Levy-Rapoport (@Noga_LR) is a 17-year-old climate activist, public speaker, and organiser of the UK climate strikes at the UK Student Climate Network. On 15 February 2019, she led London's first climate strike march, before joining the UK Student Climate Network as a volunteer, and began organising around the Green New Deal with GND UK. Since February, the 17-year-old has spoken at numerous panels, events, strikes and protests around the UK and across Europe, with key speeches at the Children’s Media Conference and the UN’s International Maritime Organisation. In October 2019, she was selected by the Evening Standard as one of London's most influential people of 2019 as part of their annual Progress 1000 list. Dr Thomas Smith (@DrTELS) is Assistant Professor in Environmental Geography in the department of Geography & Envirnonment at the LSE. He teaches a number of climate and environmental change courses; his research is concerned with the causes and impacts of wildfires. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place.

Can Technology Deliver a Sustainable Future?
Mar 07 2020 75 mins  
Contributor(s): Eugenie Dugoua, Ria Sen, Carolyn Steel | Can emerging technologies save the planet? Join us as experts assess the transformational potential of tools like AI to tackle critical environmental challenges such as climate change and food security. Eugenie Dugoua (@EugenieDugoua) is Assistant Professor of Environmental Economics in the Department of Geography & Environment, LSE. Her interests lie primarily in understanding how institutions and policies influence science, innovation, and technological change so that economic development can be sustainable for the environment and societies. Eugenie recently graduated with a Ph.D. from Columbia University. She is also a Fellow at the Initiative for Sustainable Energy Policy at Johns Hopkins University and a Beijer Young Scholar with the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Ria Sen is an LSE alumna and Preparedness Officer with the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster, led by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) in Rome, Italy. Her functions centre on enhancing readiness and capacity of national governments to respond to disasters. Most recently, she served with the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, evaluating regional progress in Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. Her tenure with the United Nations Development Programme Pacific Office included acting as the team's innovation focal point for driving forward the Pacific’s only South-South cooperation initiative on e-governance. Ria was also formerly engaged with the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific to deliver training and develop technical materials on disaster risk reduction in the Asia-Pacific context. Carolyn Steel (@carolynsteel) is a leading thinker on food and cities. Her first book, Hungry City, received international acclaim, establishing her as an influential voice in a wide variety of fields across academia, industry and the arts. It won the Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for Non-Fiction and was chosen as a BBC Food Programme book of the year. A London-based architect, academic and writer, Carolyn has lectured at the University of Cambridge, London Metropolitan University, Wageningen University and the London School of Economics and is in international demand as a speaker. Her 2009 TED talk has received more than one million views. Jessica Templeton is a political scientist and the Director of LSE100, LSE’s flagship interdisciplinary course taken by all undergraduates. Jessica’s research focuses on global environmental politics, and particularly on sustainability, global governance of chemicals, and the interface between science and policy. Jessica also writes for the Earth Negotiations Bulletin, a nonpartisan publication of the International Institute for Sustainable Development that analyses multilateral environmental negotiations conducted under the auspices of the United Nations. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld

Africa Talks: the global legacy of African women writers
Mar 07 2020 70 mins  
Contributor(s): Margaret Busby, Sarah Ladipo Manyika | African literature is increasingly esteemed around the world, but the true extent of its global historic influence remains largely overlooked. Negotiating the common obstacles of race, class and gender, African women writers have long-confronted crucial matters of independence, freedom and oppression. Margaret Busby, the editor of New Daughters of Africa—a major international collection showcasing the work of more than 200 women writers of African descent—is joined by the highly acclaimed writer Sarah Ladipo Manyika, and Angela Wachuka – leading publisher of some of Africa’s leading voices, to reflect on the impact of women writers on shaping the ways we understand today’s social and political upheavals. Addressing African literature’s rich cultural history across centuries and continents, the event will explore sisterhood, feminist movements, political and academic thought and the ways African women have taken ownership of these spaces through memory and storytelling. By putting writers in conversation with social scientists, the event will demonstrate the importance of fiction and non-fiction alike in understanding the African female experience, and the enduring legacy of African women’s thought. Margaret Busby OBE, Hon. FRSL is a Ghanaian-born publisher, editor, and writer. She was Britain’s youngest and first black woman book publisher when in the 1960s she co-founded the publishing house Allison and Busby. To pre-order a copy of New Daughters of Africa, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to New Daughters of Africa. Sarah Ladipo Manyika is a writer, academic and overall lover of stories. She was raised in Nigeria and has lived in Kenya, France, Zimbabwe and England. Sarah is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. Her debut novel, In Dependence, is an international bestseller while her second novel, Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun, has been translated into a number of languages. Sarah was Founding Books Editor of Ozy Books and a long-time lecturer at San Francisco State University. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the women’s writers residency, Hedgebrook. To pre-order a copy of In Dependence, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to In Dependence. To pre-order a copy of Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun. Karin Barber is an Africanist anthropologist whose work has focused on the anthropology of texts, oral performance, popular culture and religion. Her core regional specialism is Yoruba (Western Nigeria). The Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (FLCA) strengthens LSE’s long-term commitment to placing Africa at the heart of understandings and debates on global issues. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld


Where Are We on Global Health?
Mar 06 2020 60 mins  
Contributor(s): Joe Cerrell, Clare Wenham | With 10 years to go, will the world meet Sustainable Development Goal 3: ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages? Joe Cerrell, Managing Director, Global Policy and Advocacy, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in conversation with Claire Wenham, Assistant Professor at the LSE, will discuss the progress made and challenges that lie ahead on targets such as ending the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, and achieving universal health coverage. Discussion will focus on recent successes, lessons learned and how governments and the private sector could—and should—step up in the new decade. Joe Cerrell (@CerrJ) is based in the Gates Foundation’s European Office in London. In this role, Joe oversees the foundation's relationships with donor governments in Europe, Asia-Pacific, and the Middle East. His team seeks to expand the foundation’s partnerships with these governments, but also corporations, foundations and other non-governmental organizations, to support increased global engagement and progress on global health and agriculture. Since joining the foundation in 2001, Joe has held a number of positions, including director for Europe and Middle East and director of Global Health Policy and Advocacy. Prior to his time at the foundation, he served in a variety of senior roles in government and strategy consulting practices, including positions in the Clinton White House under former Vice President Al Gore and at APCO Worldwide. Joe currently serves on the board of directors for the ONE Campaign and Comic Relief. He received a bachelor's degree in political science from the University of Southern California. Clare Wenham (@clarewenham) is Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy in the Department of Health Policy, LSE. She is the Director of the MSc in Global Health Policy and sits on the steering committee of the LSE Global Health Initiative. Her work mostly falls in the cross-over between global health and international relations focusing on global health security and global health governance. In particular, her recent research has concentrated on Zika, Ebola, and more broadly, on the governance structures of the global health landscape and global disease control. She previously worked at the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, delivering a series of projects relating to surveillance and transmission of infectious disease. Beth Kreling is a Senior Policy Fellow in the Department of Health Policy, LSE and has spent a number of years at LSE working across the Department’s Global Health portfolio. She helped to establish and manage the Global Health Initiative, an inter-departmental research unit set up to increase the coherence and visibility of Global Health research activity across the School. Amongst other varied projects, she has led a multi-partner, EU funded, public-private initiative - Big Data for Better Outcomes - facilitating the use of “big data” to enable the transition towards value-based, outcomes-focused health care systems in Europe. Beth has a background in international development and consultancy, with a particular focus on Africa and India. Prior to joining LSE, Beth worked for the Commonwealth Secretariat’s Health and Education Unit, engaging with stakeholders across Commonwealth governments, inter-governmental organisations and NGOs on education policy priorities. This built on previous experience as Chief Operating Officer of education NGO Link Community Development International, where she oversaw operations and programme development in the UK and across five sub-Saharan African offices. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld


Behind the Tin Sheets: city makers of Bangalore
Mar 06 2020 63 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Laura Bear, Ekta Mittal | Stories of ghosts, love and labour as narrated by workers who built the Metro Rail in Bangalore are told in this screening and Q&A of two films by filmmaker Ekta M. These films are a part of Behind the Tin Sheets project and were co-directed by Yashaswini. R. In_transience is a film about workers' fantastical stories through labour and leisure set against shifting landscapes of a city. With residues of romance and realism, the film attempts to meander through the disparate metamorphosis of a city. A far away village set amidst a growing metropolis where workers narrate stories of love and longing. Laura Bear is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE and is the author of Lines of the Nation: Indian Railway Workers, Bureaucracy and the Intimate Historical Self. Ekta Mittal co-founded Maraa, a media and arts collective in Bangalore in 2008. She works there as a practitioner, researcher, curator and facilitator around issues of gender, labour & caste in rural and urban contexts. She also works with creative practices in public space, through independent production and collaborations with other artists. She has been making films around labour, migration and cities since 2009. Her recent film birha is about separation and longing in the context of migration. Sunil Kumar (@urban_sk) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. He recently completed a project on the urbanisation-construction-migration - Kumar, S and M. Fernandez (2016) 'The Urbanisation-Construction-Migration Nexus in Five Cities in South Asia: Kabul, Dhaka, Chennai, Kathmandu and Lahore. Research commissioned by the UK Department for International Development’s (DFID) South Asia Research Hub (SARH), New Delhi, India. Briefing note (six pages) The full report is available at http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/65861/ (30MB) The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld

Planet, Population and Rights
Mar 06 2020 60 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Julia Corwin, Carina Hirsch, Yamini Mishra, Professor Wendy Sigle | The headlines remind us daily that we are hurtling towards a planetary emergency. The dire warnings of catastrophic and irreversible environmental disaster suggest the shape of our world will change fundamentally. Calls to action often draw simplistically on fears of overpopulation, misrepresenting the complex relationship between demographic trends and climate change. Julia Corwin (@JulesCorwin) is Assistant Professor in Environment at the Department of Geography and Environment, LSE. Her work focuses on the politics of global environmental governance and its relationship to the informal economy and global trade. Her research has focused on global flows of electronic ‘waste’ and their revaluation through economies of repair and maintenance in India, conducted through a patchwork ethnography of local markets understood as significant sites in global capital networks. Carina Hirsch is an Advocacy & Projects Manager at the Margaret Pyke Trust. Carina has been committed to improving the status of women and girls for over 10 years within UN agencies, International NGOs and at the Margaret Pyke Trust since joining in 2015. She has solid field experience implementing projects to improve the lives of rural women in Niger, Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso and India. Yamini Mishra (@Yamini___Mishra) is the Director of Gender, Sexuality and Identity at Amnesty International, providing leadership and vision to the world’s largest human rights movement on gender and discrimination. Prior to this she was the Regional Gender Responsive Budgeting (GRB) Specialist for the Regional Office for Asia Pacific for UN Women. Before joining UN Women, Yamini was the Executive Director, Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA), Delhi, an organisation which does cutting edge work on governance issues using budget analysis as the entry point. Wendy Sigle is Professor of Gender and Family Studies at the Department of Gender Studies. She has worked on a variety of issues related to families and family policy in historical and contemporary societies. Her research is is quantitative and applies both econometric and demographic methods to the analysis of secondary survey data or data drawn from official government records. Additionanly, her research critiques how quantitative methods are applied and how quantitative evidence is used and interpreted, particular in a policy context. Laura J Brown (@Lolabear88) is an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow based at the Department of International Development at LSE. Her research focuses on links between the environment and women’s health, with a particular focus on maternal and reproductive health and behaviour. Laura holds a first class BSc in Biological Anthropology from the University of Kent as well as an MSc in Reproductive & Sexual Health Research and a PhD in Epidemiology & Population Health (Demography), both from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.


Gender Equality and the Data Revolution
Mar 05 2020 56 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Oriana Bandiera, Tonusree Basu, Twivwe Siwale | The innovative use of data has contributed to the women’s movement fighting for equal pay, but there is still a large gap in the availability of quality data measuring the well-being and contributions of women to society, especially in developing countries. Without sufficient high-quality and disaggregated statistics, many women will remain at risk of being invisible and persistent gender inequalities will not be bridged. The UN’s 2030 Agenda calls for a data revolution for sustainable development which would lead to enhanced understanding and advocacy, more informed planning, and better decision-making. Ahead of International Women’s Day 2020, this high-level discussion will explore the important roles of data quality and availability in generating evidence to inform policies promoting gender equality. We will showcase perspectives from developing and developed country policymakers and researchers on the challenges and opportunities for collecting and sharing gender data. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics at the LSE and the Director of STICERD. She is also a Research Programme Director for the IGC State research programme and Member of the IGC Steering Group.She is a member of IZA, CEPR, BREAD, EUDN and JPAL-Europe. Her primary research interests are in labour economics, development economics, and the economics of organisations. Tonusree Basu is Lead, Policy Priorities at Open Government Partnership (OGP). She is responsible for strategy and partnerships to support reforms, on areas like anti-corruption, gender, digital governance across OGP member countries. Tonu has consulted on international open government projects, including with UN Women and the World Bank. Tonu started her career working with grassroots organizations in India, and serves on the Board of the Society for Citizens Vigilance Initiative', India, that supports citizen empowerment among underserved communities. Her previous roles have included leading projects related to parliamentary engagement with citizens at PRS Legislative Research, India, and managing a San Francisco-based global policy network on impact investing, established with the UK Cabinet Office and World Economic Forum. She holds an MSc in Politics and Communication from the London School of Economics and an MPA from Harvard Kennedy School, where she was a Public Service Fellow. Tonu has a diploma in conflict management and is trained in the classical Indian dance form - Odissi. Twivwe Siwale (@TwivweSiwale) is a Country Economist for the IGC in Zambia. She is a Commonwealth Scholar who holds an MSc in Public Economics from the University of York. She has over six years of experience in the field of public finance and management with an emphasis in taxation. Prior to joining the IGC, Twivwe worked at the Zambia Revenue Authority as a Policy and Legislation Officer where she worked on policy implementation in the Domestic Taxes Division. Sandra Sequeira is an Associate Professor of Development Economics in the Department of International Development, a research affiliate at STICERD, CEPR, Novafrica and the International Growth Centre. Her research interests are in development economics, trade and consumer behaviour. She holds a PhD from Harvard University, an MA from the Fletcher School and a BA from Universidade Nova in Lisbon, Portugal. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place. The full programme will be online in January 2020.

Tribes: how our need to belong can make or break society
Mar 05 2020 67 mins  
Contributor(s): David Lammy MP | In 2007, inspired by the bicentenary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act and looking to explore his own African roots, David Lammy took a DNA test. Part memoir, part call-to-arms Tribes explores how David Lammy felt reading his DNA results, and how they led him to rethink what it meant to need to belong to a tribe, and the results of being part of one. How this need – genetically programmed and socially acquired – can manifest itself in positive ways, collaboratively achieving great things that individuals alone cannot. And yet how, in recent years, globalisation and digitisation have led to new, more pernicious kinds of tribalism. David Lammy (@DavidLammy), MP for Tottenham, is most renowned for leading the fight for a referendum on the final negotiated Brexit deal. However, when David Lammy was named Politician of the Year by both GQ and the Political Studies Association, he dedicated both awards to his parents, the Windrush Generation and his friend Khadija Saye who lost her life in Grenfell Tower. David was the first to call for independent inquiry into the Grenfell Tower Fire. He has also secured a Compensation Fund for the victims of the Windrush scandal, placing pressure on the government to treat their plight as an injustice to be rectified. Armine Ishkanian is Interim Executive Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme in the International Inequalities Institute and Associate Professor in the Department of Social Policy. Her research focuses on the relationship between civil society, democracy, development, and social transformation. She has examined how civil society organisations and social movements engage in policy processes and transformative politics in a number of countries including Armenia, Egypt, Greece, and the UK. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place.

Using Behavioural Science for Inclusion in the City
Mar 05 2020 65 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Grace Lordan, Karina Robinson, Brenda Trenowden, Irshaad Ahmad, Richard Nesbitt, Teresa Parker | An inclusive workforce offers companies a distinct competitive advantage. Enhanced profits, innovation, growth, and employee wellbeing. Companies with a diverse and inclusive workforce respond better to the needs and demands of global clients and corporations. Yet creating an environment which is inclusive of all talent is not straightforward. This will be a panel discussion on ‘Inclusion in the City’, a report that gives practical insights from behavioural science research to the problems and solutions posed by people who understand the financial and services industry the best: its own talent. This event will also announce The Inclusion Initiative (@LSE_TII) at LSE. A new research programme that will create new partnerships between world-class academics, the finance and professional services sector and visionary business leaders. Leveraging insights from behavioural science TII aims to move participating firms towards an environment which is inclusive of all talent, to the benefit of bottom line. Grace Lordan (@GraceLordan_) is Associate Professor in Behavioural Science at LSE and the founding director of The Inclusion Initiative. An economist by background, Grace’s research is focused on understanding why some individuals succeed over others in work because of factors beyond their control. Grace’s research and consultancy draws on the cutting- edge methodological techniques of behavioural science and economics to design and analyse interventions that help understand and change employment outcomes, conduct at work, diversity and inclusion within occupations, occupational sorting and worker wellbeing. Karina Robinson (@_KarinaRobinson) is a founding co-director of The Inclusion Initiative: Financial and Professional Service Focus. Karina is also the Founder and CEO of Robinson Hambro. The firm specialises in Board search and Chairman advisory; including advising companies with a global outlook by drawing on the experience of a multilingual and multidisciplinary team. Karina sits on the Court of Governors at LSE and is a member of the LSE Finance Committee. Irshaad Ahmad is Head of Institutional Europe and a member of the European Executive Committee of Allianz Global Investors. He has business development and client coverage responsibilities for institutional clients in Europe and chairs the European Institutional Executive Committee. Irshaad joined AllianzGI in January 2016 from AXA Investment Managers where he was Head of UK and Nordics and had been CEO UK since 2011. Richard Nesbitt is Professor at the Rotman School of Management, Retired COO of CIBC and Retired CEO of Toronto Stock Exchange. Teresa Parker is president for EMEA, responsible for Northern Trust’s business and regulatory affairs in the region. Teresa also sits on Northern Trust Corporation’s Management Group. Prior to her appointment to lead the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region, Teresa spent three years as the chief operating officer for Asset Servicing with global responsibility for Northern Trust’s business capabilities, technology and operating model. Brenda Trenowden is a Partner in PwC UK and Global co-chair of the 30% Club. Prior to joining PwC Brenda led the Financial Institutions Group in Europe for ANZ Bank, was a member of their UK Management Board. She has also worked for a number of global financial institutions including BNY Mellon, Lloyds Banking Group, BNP Paribas, Peregrine and Citi. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.

The Carbon Conscious Consumer: going beyond nudges with nudge plus
Mar 04 2020 63 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Peter John, Professor Theresa M Marteau, Sanchayan Banerjee, Professor Gerry Stoker | Recent advancements made by the UK's Committee on Climate Change (UKCCC) towards achieving the Paris Agreement goals by announcing their net zero emissions target shows the UK's commitment to tackling one of the most important challenges of the 21st century: the climate change dilemma. Can we sustain this behaviour change through old-school nudges only? Or is there a need for greater reflection on the part of individuals? Peter John (@peterjohn10) is Professor of Public Policy at King's College, London and author of Nudge, Nudge, Think, Think: Experimenting with Ways to Change Civic Behaviour. Professor Theresa M Marteau (@MarteauTM) is Director of the Behaviour and Health Research Unit, University of Cambridge. Sanchayan Banerjee (@SanchayanBanerj) is a PhD Candidate in Environmental Economics at LSE. He holds an MSc in Environmental Economics and Climate Change (Distinction) from LSE (2017-18) and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics (Silver Medalist) from Jadavpur University, India (2014-17). Professor Gerry Stoker (@ProfStoker) is Professor of Governance at the University of Southampton. Dr Ganga Shreedhar (@geeshree)Assistant Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, and Affiliate of the Department of Geography and Environment, LSE. The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, environmental social science and climate change. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place.

Fog in Channel: continent cut off
Mar 04 2020 82 mins  
Contributor(s): Lord MacPherson, Professor Kai Spiekermann | Has the British elite’s role changed over a century? This evening’s event will investigate the changing role of the political elite in the period of almost a century since Noel Coward produced his one act comedy Hands Across the Sea. For this play Coward drew upon his intimate friendship with Lord Mountbatten and his wife Edwina, who went on to preside over British withdrawal from India. The decades since Coward’s play have seen World War II, the Suez Crisis, the Winds of Change, and entry into Europe in 1973, as well as now, in the 21st century, Britain’s withdrawal from the EU. Our panel will discuss whether the composition of the British political elite and its role has changed over this period. The panel discussion will be followed by a student-led production of Coward’s one act comedy Hands Across the Sea, by the LSE Student Union Drama Society and the LSE Language Centre. Lord MacPherson is former Permanent Secretary to the Treasury. Kai Spiekermann is Professor of Political Philosophy and the Doctoral Programme Director in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics. Dr Angus Wrenn is Co-ordinating Language Teacher (EAP) with special responsibilities for Literature. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld Has the British elite’s role changed over a century? This evening’s event will investigate the changing role of the political elite in the period of almost a century since Noel Coward produced his one act comedy Hands Across the Sea. For this play Coward drew upon his intimate friendship with Lord Mountbatten and his wife Edwina, who went on to preside over British withdrawal from India. The decades since Coward’s play have seen World War II, the Suez Crisis, the Winds of Change, and entry into Europe in 1973, as well as now, in the 21st century, Britain’s withdrawal from the EU. Our panel will discuss whether the composition of the British political elite and its role has changed over this period. The panel discussion will be followed by a student-led production of Coward’s one act comedy Hands Across the Sea, by the LSE Student Union Drama Society and the LSE Language Centre. Lord MacPherson is former Permanent Secretary to the Treasury. Kai Spiekermann is Professor of Political Philosophy and the Doctoral Programme Director in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics. Dr Angus Wrenn is Co-ordinating Language Teacher (EAP) with special responsibilities for Literature. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld Has the British elite’s role changed over a century? This evening’s event will investigate the changing role of the political elite in the period of almost a century since Noel Coward produced his one act comedy Hands Across the Sea. For this play Coward drew upon his intimate friendship with Lord Mountbatten and his wife Edwina, who went on to preside over British withdrawal from India. The decades since Coward’s play have seen World War II, the Suez Crisis, the Winds of Change, and entry into Europe in 1973, as well as now, in the 21st century, Britain’s withdrawal from the EU. Our panel will discuss whether the composition of the British political elite and its role has changed over this period. The panel discussion will be followed by a student-led production of Coward’s one act comedy Hands Across the Sea, by the LSE Student Union Drama Society and the LSE Language Centre. Lord MacPherson is former Permanent Secretary to the Treasury. Kai Spiekermann is Professor of Political Philosophy and the Doctoral Programme Director in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics. Dr Angus Wrenn is Co-ordinating Language Teacher (EAP) with special responsibilities for Literature. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld


Propaganda and Democratic Resistance
Mar 04 2020 54 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Shakuntala Banaji, Darren Moon, Peter Pomerantsev | Propaganda seems like a very 20th century issue. But it is back on the agenda due to the scandals provoked by social media’s manipulation of voters in the Brexit referendum and the Trump election. This round table brings together experts on propaganda and the Internet to explore the populist problem presented by “fake news” – and how we can resist it. It explores examples from India, Russia, and China: Banaji on WhatsApp misinformation in India, Pomerantsev on Russian misinformation campaigns, Callahan on China’s political influence campaigns, and Moon and an International Relations LSE student on their short video made for the “Visual International Politics: IR318” course. The goal is to think about how we need to develop the critical visual literacy skills that allow us to “reshape the world” in more inclusive and democratic ways. Shakuntala Banaji is associate professor of media and communications at the LSE. Her recent publications include the LSE report WhatsApp Vigilantes: An exploration of citizen reception and circulation of WhatsApp misinformation linked to mob violence in India. Darren Moon is Senior Learning Technologist in the LSE Eden Centre for Education Enhancement. He works closely with academic colleagues to develop the use of audio-visual media for teaching and learning. and has a particular interest in visual culture, methods and pedagogies. William A. Callahan is Professor of International Relations at LSE. His most recent book is Sensible Politics: Visualizing International Relations. Peter Pomerantsev is a senior fellow in the Institute for Global Affairs at the LSE. He is author of This is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld

Can Behavioural Insights Shape Policy-making All Over the World?
Mar 04 2020 59 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Liam Delaney, Dr Barbara Fasolo, Dr Adam Oliver, Dr Jet Sanders | Insights from psychology and behavioural economics are shaping policy-making all over the world, and the LSE is helping to make this happening. In the last decade methods and insights from behavioural science have been increasingly applied to inform policy decision-making all over the world. The UK has led this global trend since 2010, when the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) - the ‘nudge unit’ - was set up within the Cabinet Office. Since then, behavioural units have been created in more than 200 public institutions – not only governments, but also international institutions (e.g. World Bank, WHO, OECD, EU), and national regulators (e.g. in the UK the Financial Conduct Authority - FCA; NEST; Public Health England - PHE) – as well as in many NGOs and non-profit companies. Since the very beginning, the LSE has been a key part of this fast-growing trend. On the teaching side, for example, the LSE Executive MSc in Behavioural Science is the world-first (and only) executive Master programme to have trained, to date, more than 250 leaders of such behavioural units across the world. On the research side, moreover, the LSE has behavioural expertise that has been regularly applied to policy projects for the betterment of society. This event will discuss these trends and the various research collaborations that behavioural scientists across all the LSE have been developing in a variety of policy domains by working together with numerous partner institutions. Liam Delaney (@LiamDelaneyEcon) is Professor of Economics at UCD and Visiting Professor of Economics at Stirling University. A former Fulbright and Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow, he was Deputy Director of the UCD Geary Institute from 2008 to 2011, and Deputy Dean of Stirling Management School from 2011 to 2016. He has worked at the intersection of economics and psychology for his career and has published widely in both economics and psychology journals, including Economic Journal, Journal of European Economics Association, Health Psychology, Psychological Science, and Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr Barbara Fasolo (@barbarafasolo) is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science in the Department of Management and Head of the Behavioral Research Lab. She studies how people make decisions that involve risk, trade-offs, and complexity and is interested in choice architecture that helps good decision making. Dr Adam Oliver (@1969ajo) is a behavioural economist and behavioural public policy analyst at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His edited the collection ‘Behavioural Public Policy’ (Cambridge UP, 2013), and authored the books, ‘The Origins of Behavioural Public Policy’ (Cambridge UP, 2017) and ‘Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy’ (Cambridge UP, 2019). He edits the journals Health Economics, Policy and Law, and Behavioural Public Policy. Dr Jet Sanders (@jetgsanders) finds patterns that can be used to change behaviour for social good, with a particular interest in time, health and wellbeing. Jet completed a PhD in experimental psychology, worked as a Principal Behavioural Insights Advisor in Public Health England’s Behavioural Insights Team and is now an Assistant Professor at the Psychological and Behavioural Science Department of the London School of Economics. Dr Matteo M Galizzi (@Matteo_Galizzi) is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science and Co-Director of the Executive MSc in Behavioural Science in the LSE Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. @LSEBehavioural Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place.

Shaping America's Future
Mar 04 2020 59 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Lawrence R. Jacobs, Gideon Rachman, Professor Leah Wright Rigueur, Professor Linda Yueh | Who will win the 2020 US presidential election? The outcome could shape America's - and the world's - future for years to come. On March 3rd, 2020, Americans in 14 states will pick their candidates to face off against President Trump in the November presidential election. With the largest Democratic field of candidates in recent memory, Super Tuesday will reshape the already hotly contested Democratic race. Will the party turn to a progressive candidate or will a more centrist candidate emerge from Super Tuesday as the clear front-runner? The day after this important contest, join us for a panel discussion with academics and journalists who will reflect on the US presidential primary results and give their predictions for the general election. Lawrence R. Jacobs (@larryrjacobs) is the Walter F. and Joan Mondale Chair for Political Studies and director of the Center for the Study of Politics and Governance in the Hubert H. Humphrey School and the Department of Political Science at the University of Minnesota. Gideon Rachman (@gideonrachman) is Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, Financial Times. Leah Wright Rigueur (@LeahRigueur) is Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor, LSE IDEAS, and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld

The Rise of Modern Europe
Mar 04 2020 57 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Simon Glendinning, Dr Darian Meacham, Professor Helen Parish | We explore questions concerning events and developments which have been thought fundamental to the history of a distinctively "modern" European world - the decline of magic and religion and the rise of science and technology. Such events and developments are not only to be thought in relation to the opening-up and holding sway of that world but also in relation to its threatening crises and exhaustion. In 1919, in the wake of the first world war of European origin, the French poet and essayist Paul Valery reflected on a European world which seemed alive suddenly to its own end: "We later civilizations we too now know that we are mortal". How should we understand the becoming-modern of the European world? And what, today, should we make of the events and developments which have given rise to a sense of its ending? Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Professor in European Philosophy in the European Institute at LSE. Darian Meacham is Assistant Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy at Maastricht University. Helen Parish (@HelenLParish) is Professor of Early Modern History in the Department of History at the University of Reading. Dr Dina Gusejnova is Assistant Professor in International History at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place.

Financing a Global Climate Deal
Mar 03 2020 59 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Ann Pettifor, Gianpiero Nacci, Rhian-Mari Thomas, Steve Waygood | A key challenge for the COP26 climate conference to be held in Glasgow in November 2020 is to agree how to harness the world’s financial system behind a rapid transition to a net-zero, resilient and inclusive global economy. Many positive developments are underway among central banks, investors, civil society and development banks. But at present, these do not add up to a credible strategy for mobilising the trillions that will be needed for climate action both in industrialised countries such as the UK and also in the developing countries of the Global South. This event brings together leaders in sustainable finance who will explore how key financial breakthroughs can be achieved in 2020. Gianpiero Nacci (@NacciGianpiero) is Deputy Director of the Energy Efficiency and Climate Change team at EBRD. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is Director of PRIME and author of The Case for the Green New Deal. Rhian-Mari Thomas (@RhianMariThomas) is Chief Executive Officer at the Green Finance Institute. Steve Waygood (@stevewaygood) is Chief Responsible Investment Officer at Aviva Investors. Nick Robins (@NVJRobins1) is Professor in Practice for Sustainable Finance, Grantham Research Institute for Climate Change and the Environment at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld This event is part of the LSE Festival: Shape the World running from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, with a series of events exploring how social science can make the world a better place. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Financing a Global Climate Deal. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.



Shaping the World
Mar 02 2020 78 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Simon Hix, Dr George Ofosu, Professor Peter Trubowitz | What are the forces that are shaping the world today? LSE experts explore the current political, economic and social landscape by using examples from Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. How do they see the changing world from the perspective of those areas and what should the agenda be for the social sciences from their experience and expertise? Simon Hix (@simonjhix) is Pro-Director (Research) and Harold Laski Professor of Political Science at LSE. He is one of the leading researchers, teachers, and commentators on European and comparative politics in the UK. He has published over 100 books and articles and has won several prestigious prizes and fellowships for his research, including from the US-UK Fulbright Commission, the American Political Science Association, and the UK Economic and Social Research Council. He is also a prize-winning teacher, and continues to teach “Introduction to Political Science” to over 300 first-year undergraduate students. George Ofosu is Assistant Professor in the Department of Government at LSE. His research focuses on political accountability, election integrity, legislator behavior, and the quality of democracy, with a regional focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. He also works on issues of research design and transparency. His research has appeared in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science and Electoral Studies. Dr. Ofosu is a Democracy and Development Fellow at the Ghana Center for Democratic Development. Peter Trubowitz is a Professor of International Relations, and Director of the US Centre at LSE and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. His main teaching and research interests are in the fields of international security and US foreign policy. He also writes and comments frequently on US politics. Before joining the LSE, he was Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. He has also held visiting positions at Harvard, Princeton, University of California at San Diego, Universidad de Chile, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE) in Mexico City, and the Beijing Foreign Studies University, where he was the J. William Fulbright Distinguished Lecturer in American Foreign Policy. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #ShapetheWorld



Supply Chain Economics and the Next Phase of the Anti-Modern Slavery Movement
Feb 25 2020 79 mins  
Contributor(s): John Studzinski | John Studzinski will speak on the next phase of the anti-slavery movement. He will set out what must be done to keep the eyes of the world on this human rights crisis, and how the frontline and business communities can become more unified in the abolitionist effort. John Studzinski is vice chairman of PIMCO and a managing director. As vice chairman, he helps advance PIMCO’s global strategy and serves as a key strategic advisor to many clients around the world. Prior to joining PIMCO in 2018, he was vice chairman, investor relations and business development, and a senior managing director at Blackstone, overseeing sovereign and institutional investor relationships and advising large family offices. Mr. Studzinski was previously head of European investment banking at Morgan Stanley and deputy chairman of Morgan Stanley International. He also worked at HSBC Group, helping to build its investment banking division and serving on the bank’s group management board. Mr Studzinski is a non-executive director at the Home Office in the U.K., chair of the Home Office’s Audit and Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC) and co-chair of the Business Against Slavery Forum, a partnership between government and business to accelerate progress in tackling modern slavery in supply chains. He is the co-founder and chair of the Arise Foundation, which partners with local networks to stop human trafficking, and vice-chair emeritus of Human Rights Watch. He is also founder and chairman of the Genesis Foundation, a U.K.-based charity that supports young artists. He has 30 years of investment experience and holds an MBA from the University of Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Bowdoin College. In 2008, the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List named him Commander of the British Empire (CBE) for services to the arts and charity. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. They are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEAntiSlavery

Windows of Opportunity: how nations create wealth
Feb 24 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Lord Sainsbury | Is neoclassical growth theory dead? Why have the biggest industrial economies stagnated since the financial crisis? Is the idea of a competitive threat from China due to a lack of understanding of economic theory or is it a genuine danger to our standard of living? At this event David Sainsbury will set out a new theory of economic growth which explains why the G7 countries have experienced slowing rates of labour productivity over the last twenty five years, the so-called ‘productivity puzzle’, and put forward policies which governments can adapt to innovate and restore their rates of economic growth. In his new book which he will be talking about at this event David puts forward a new theory of economic growth, placing individual firms' investment decisions in the central role. He argues that economic growth comes not as a steady process, but as a series of jumps, based on investment in high value-added firms. He suggests a new theory of growth and development, with a role for government in 'picking winners' at the level of technologies and industries rather than individual firms. With the role of industrial policy at the centre of the Brexit debate, but a significant intellectual gap in setting out what that policy should be, this talk could not be more timely. David Sainsbury was Finance Director of J. Sainsbury plc from 1973 – 1990 and Chairman from 1992 – 1998. He became Lord Sainsbury of Turville in October, 1997 and was appointed Minister of Science and Innovation from July 1998 until November 2006. He is the founder of the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and founded and chairs the Institute for Government. He was elected Chancellor of the University of Cambridge in October 2011. This event marks the publication of David's new book, Windows of Opportunity: How Nations Create Wealth. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth

Game Theory and Politics
Feb 20 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Bernhard von Stengel Professor Bernhard von Stengel | Game theory is the 'science of interaction'. This talk will explain some insights of game theory and apply them to current politics. Of course politicians play games. They offer cheap promises that they think they don't have to fulfil. Such as a "simple" in-out referendum on EU membership. That game plan went wrong. Game theory could have helped, with tools for thinking ahead and concepts of strategy. Game theory can also help explain the incentive problems of climate change and reasons for democratic deadlock. This talk will highlight some uses and mis-uses of game theory and decision theory with examples from politics. Bernhard von Stengel (@bvonstengel) is Professor of Mathematics at the London School of Economics which he joined in 1998, after studies in Germany and the USA. He is a former Vice President for Communications of the Game Theory Society, scientific chair of their 5th World Congress in 2016, and currently Deputy Head (Research) of the LSE Department of Mathematics. His research is on mathematical and computational questions of game theory. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics (@LSEMaths) is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGameTheory

Standing For Reason
Feb 20 2020 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Gordon Brown, Professor John Sexton | John Sexton argues that a secular dogmatism has come to dominate political discourse, and the enterprise of thought is in danger. He then argues that our universities, the stewards of thought, are the last best hope to stem this tide of dogmatism, and that they can effect reform in the society around them by inculcating the values of secular ecumenism in their citizens and by sending those citizens forth, one generation after another, to carry those values into society. John Sexton served as fifteenth President of New York University from 2002 through 2015. He is NYU’s Benjamin F. Butler Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus of the Law School. Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, President Emeritus Sexton also serves on the board of the Institute of International Education and is past Chair of the American Council on Education. In 2015, he received the TIAA-CREF Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence, recognizing outstanding university presidents, and the Institute of International Education’s Duggan Award for Mutual Understanding. In Spring 2016 he held the Kluge Chair in American Law and Governance at the Library of Congress. He is the recipient of twenty-one honorary degrees. Before coming to NYU, President Emeritus Sexton clerked at the United States Supreme Court and the United States Court of Appeals. From 1966-1975, he was a Professor of Religion at Saint Francis College in Brooklyn. President Sexton received a Bachelor’s degree in history, a Master’s degree in comparative religion, and a PhD in the history of American religion, all from Fordham University. He received a law degree magna cum laude from Harvard Law School. His latest book is Standing for Reason: The University in a Dogmatic Age, the introduction for which was written by former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. To pre-order a copy of Standing for Reason: The University in a Dogmatic Age, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Standing for Reason: The University in a Dogmatic Age. Gordon Brown (@OfficeGSBrown) is the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education and former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2007 to 2010. Previously, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1997 to 2007, making him the longest-serving Chancellor in modern history. Gordon served as the Labour Member of Parliament for Dunfermline East (1983- 2005), and for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath (2005-2015) in his home area of Fife in Scotland. He was elected as Leader of the Labour Party serving from 2007-2010. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The Twitter hashtag for this event is #LSEReason

What Has European Integration Ever Done For Us?
Feb 19 2020 92 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Esra Özyürek, Rossella Pagliuchi-Lor, Professor Waltraud Schelkle | Is integration in Europe truly inclusive, or are some marginalised by the very process that is meant to bring Europeans together? Esra Özyürek (@esragozyurek) is Professor in European Anthropology and Chair in Contemporary Turkish Studies. She received her BA in Sociology and Political Science at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul and her MA and PhD in Anthropology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Before joining the LSE she taught at the Anthropology Department of University of California, San Diego. Professor Özyürek is a political anthropologist who seeks to understand how Islam, Christianity, secularism, and nationalism are dynamically positioned in relation to each other in Turkey and in Europe. Rossella Pagliuchi-Lor (@unhcruk) is the UNHCR’s Representative to the UK. Ms Pagliuchi-Lor took up her post as UNHCR’s Representative to the UK in December 2018. Prior to this she had served two years as Director for External Relations at UNHCR‘s Headquarters in Geneva. She has over 30 years of experience in refugee and humanitarian work, and has served UNHCR in a diverse country contexts, including Pakistan, Nepal, Iraq, Kenya, Belgium, Hungary and Italy. Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the European Institute, LSE. Simon Glendinning (@lonanglo) is Head of the European Institute and Professor in European Philosophy at LSE. LSE Shape the World Series - to celebrate the completion of LSE’s newest building, a series of public events organised by some of the academic departments who are now housed in the Centre Building will take place this term. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.




'Brexit' and the Future of British Politics
Feb 17 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Sir Anthony Seldon, Professor Tony Travers | Is Brexit a transformative moment, with lasting consequences? Or will identities and allegiances return to ‘normal’? When might politics move on from Brexit? Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor at the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Anthony Seldon (@AnthonySeldon) is Vice Chancellor of The University of Buckingham, a contemporary historian, commentator and political author. He is an alumnus of LSE having obtained his PhD in Economics from the School. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director of the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. Tickets will be available from 12noon on Monday 10 February. Browse the full programme

The Shape of the Beast
Feb 14 2020 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Arundhati Roy, Professor Amartya Sen | Join us for this Eva Colorni Memorial Lecture which will see Arundhati Roy read selected extracts from her literary and political work and engage in discussion with Amartya Sen. Arundhati Roy is the author of The God of Small Things (1997) for which she won the Man Booker Prize, and more recently of, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness (2017). Her non-fiction works include My Seditious Heart, The Shape of the Beast and Listening to Grasshoppers. She is also a political activist involved in human rights and environmental causes. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Sumi Madhok is Associate Professor of Transnational Gender Studies in the Department of Gender Studies, LSE. The Department of Gender Studies (@LSEGenderTweet) was established in 1993 to address the major intellectual challenges posed by contemporary changes in gender relations. This remains a central aim of the Department today, which is the largest research and teaching unit of its kind in Europe. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on Social Commitment and Democracy. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequalities LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Shape of the Beast. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

The International Political Economy: sources of nuclear proliferation
Feb 13 2020 92 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Etel Solingen | The 2020 Susan Strange lecture will pay tribute to Professor Strange's contributions by focusing on the international political economy dimensions of nuclear choices, for or against nuclear weapons. Whereas relative power and security dilemmas have dominated the study of nuclear proliferation for decades, an approach centered on the "cui bono" (who benefits) question reveals how domestic distributional implications related to the global economy have systematic effects on states’ nuclear choices. Etel Solingen is the Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of California Irvine and the Susan Strange Visiting Professor, 2019-20 at LSE. She received the 2018 William and Katherine Estes Award from the National Academy of Sciences recognizing basic research on issues relating to nuclear weapons. She is a former President of the International Studies Association and the recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Scholar award in International Security. Karen E Smith is a Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). The International Relations (IR) Department (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIR LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.

LSE and the Genesis of Global Governance
Feb 11 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Patricia Clavin | Starring the League of Nations, and featuring the students, staff, and archives of the London School of Economics and Political Science, the lecture recovers the entangled history of LSE with the practices of global governance. This international history lecture reveals a wide-ranging preoccupation with the material conditions of peace, alongside the more familiar concern of disarmament. Patricia Clavin is Professor of International History, and Zeitlyn Fellow and Tutor in History at Jesus College Oxford. She is an editor of the Oxford History Monographs series, and serves on the editorial board of Past and Present. In 2008-09, she held the British Academy ‘Thank-Offering-to-Britain’ Senior Research Fellowship, and in 2015 was awarded a Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Historical Society, and a Foreign Member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. In 2015, Patricia was awarded the British Academy Medal, which recognises a ‘landmark achievement that has transformed understanding’ for her book Securing the World Economy: The Reinvention of the League of Nations, 1920-1946. Matthew Jones is Professor of International History and Head of the Department of International History at LSE. The LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHistory LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.

When the Going Gets Tough: women and the future of global peace and security
Feb 10 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini | 2020 started with a threat of a new regional war in the Middle East, the continuing spread of authoritarian regimes with identity-driving extremist ideologies, a gridlocked multilateral system and an assault on international human rights norms and processes. At the UN it is hard to ignore the cognitive dissonance of a discredited Security Council and seeming fatigue at the wave of crises facing the world on the one hand, and on the other, the perfunctory conferences on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Climate Action, women peace and security and other visionary agendas. How does this flailing of the global peace and security architecture impact people, especially the civilians living daily with the threat of violence and oppression. Two decades after the adoption of the watershed UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security (WPS), Sanam Naraghi Anderlini will discuss the role, experiences and ongoing contributions of women, particularly national and transnational women's movements in tackling some of the world's most intractable security threats and conflicts. Drawing on over two decades of research, advocacy and practical work with the United Nations, civil society organisations across countries affected by war and violent extremism globally, she will reflect on how and why gendered analysis is essential to understanding emerging threats, and the strategic and practical ways in which locally rooted women's peace and security movements are harnessing the power of cultural indigenous practices and together with the promise of the global WPS agenda to raise uncomfortable truths, challenge conventional wisdoms, and offer solutions that are urgently needed On the 5th anniversary of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security, take a look ahead with the new Director. Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is an academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists and policy makers to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict affected areas. Professor Dilly Fung is the LSE Pro-Director for Education Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. Tickets will be available from 12noon on Monday 10 February. Browse the full programme. LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at When the Going Gets Tough: women and the future of global peace and security. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Capital and Ideology
Feb 06 2020 92 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Thomas Piketty | In the epic successor to one of the most important books of the century, Thomas Piketty challenges us revolutionize how we think about politics, ideology, and history. Join us for this event at which Thomas will discuss his new book, Capital and Ideology. LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and at the Paris School of Economics. He is the author of numerous articles published in journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Political Economy, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, Explorations in Economic History, Annales: Histoire, Sciences Sociales, and of a dozen books. He has done major historical and theoretical work on the interplay between economic development, the distribution of income and wealth, and political conflict. In particular, he is the initiator of the recent literature on the long run evolution of top income shares in national income (now available in the World Inequality Database). These works have led to radically question the optimistic relationship between development and inequality posited by Kuznets, and to emphasize the role of political, social and fiscal institutions in the historical evolution of income and wealth distribution. He is also the author of the international best-seller Capital in the 21st Century. To pre-order a copy of Thomas' new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Capital and Ideology. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth

Peace
Feb 04 2020 85 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Louise Arimatsu, Dr Robin Dunford, Dr Rachel Julian, Dr Michael Neu | What factors promote peace and what actions are justified to achieve it? Join us as we discuss the history, ethics, and politics of peace. Peace is highly valued, but how is it achieved? Why are some periods in world history relatively peaceful compared to others? What can we, as ordinary citizens, do to promote peace? Is pacifism a justified response to war? What are we justified in doing to ensure peace? Louise Arimatsu (@larimatsu10) is Distinguished Policy Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security at LSE, where she works on the AHRC project 'A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security' and the ERC project 'Gendered Peace'. Her current research projects include 'A Feminist Foreign Policy' and 'Women and Weapons'. Louise is an alumna of LSE. Robin Dunford is Principal Lecturer at the Centre for Spatial, Environmental and Cultural Politics, University of Brighton. Rachel Julian is Reader in Peace Studies, Leeds Beckett University. Michael Neu is Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, University of Brighton. Jonathan Birch (@birchlse) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and an Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy.



The Future of Anglo-German Relations: beyond Brexit
Feb 03 2020 98 mins  
Contributor(s): Baroness Neville-Jones, Professor Iain Begg, Dr Norbert Röttgen | This panel discussion will focus on assessing the implications of the Brexit process for the future of Anglo-German relations. The UK’s relations with Germany are important in a variety of strategic contexts. But, what are the implications of the Brexit process for the future of Anglo-German relations? How far can shared security interests withstand wider instability, if not conflict? Can the two nations maintain the same levels of foreign policy cooperation? Pauline Neville-Jones Baroness Pauline Neville-Jones is a Conservative peer in the House of Lords and sits on the Joint Committee for the National Security Strategy. She was David Cameron’s National Security Adviser and is former Minister for Security and Counter Terrorism. Until 2014, she was the PM’s Special Representative to business for cyber security. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Academic Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum at LSE IDEAS and professorial research fellow at the European Institute. Dr Norbert Röttgen (@n_roettgen) is Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee in the German Bundestag. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative by the Hertie School of Governance and the London School of Economics and Political Science, funded by Stiftung Mercator. Since its creation in 2010, the Dahrendorf project has grown into a major research and policy engagement network focused on debating Europe’s future. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. The LSESU German Society (@LSE_GermanSoc) is a student union society at the London School of Economics and Political Science. With currently over 500 members, the Society has become the largest German student society in the UK. The society promotes an interest in German culture, politics, business and language.

Unions and Their Break-ups: the UK's attempted secession from the EU, and its possible outcomes
Feb 03 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Brendan O’Leary | Northern Ireland expert, Brendan O’Leary, assesses what we’ve learnt from previous union break-ups to discover the potential futures that may unfold from the UK’s exit from the EU. Brendan O’Leary is Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania and an alumnus of LSE. He is the author, co-author, and co-editor of twenty eight books and collections, and the author or co-author of hundreds of articles or chapters in peer-reviewed journals, university presses, encyclopedia articles, and other forms of publication, including op-eds. His latest production is a three-volume study called A Treatise on Northern Ireland. Professor O’Leary is the inaugural winner of the Juan Linz prize of the International Political Science Association for contributions to the study of multinational societies, federalism and power-sharing, and in 2016 he was elected an honorary member of the Royal Irish Academy, principally because of his contributions to the field of power-sharing. In addition to his scholarly work, O’Leary has been a political and constitutional advisor to the United Nations, the European Union, the Kurdistan Regional Government of Iraq, the Governments of the UK and Ireland, and to the British Labour Party (before and during the Irish peace process). Bill Kissane is an Associate Professor in Politics in the Department of Government, LSE. LSE Shape the World Series - to celebrate the completion of LSE’s newest building, a series of public events organised by some of the academic departments who are now housed in the Centre Building will take place this term. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students. The twitter hashtag for this event is #PartofLSE

Brexit: third time lucky?
Jan 31 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Anand Menon, John Mills, Vicky Pryce, Sir Ivan Rogers | January 31st is another key date in the Brexit saga, a point of the UK's final departure from the EU. It is an important transition and one in need of expert interpretation. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. John Mills (@John_Mills_JML) is an entrepreneur, economist, and author. He is the founder and Chairman of JML, and was a Labour Councillor in Camden for over 30 years. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The event is held in collaboration with The UK in a Changing Europe (@UKandEU), a research initiative funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation, and based at King’s College London. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit


The Pentagon's Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Climate Change and War
Jan 29 2020 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Neta C. Crawford | The Pentagon was a leader, in the 1980s and 1990s, in the United States in recognising climate change as a looming security concern. The US Department of Defence has thus prepared for climate change with plans for responding to climate caused disruption to operations. The DoD is also predicting and preparing for climate change caused war. What are the security threats that will flow from climate change? Is ‘climate war’ inevitable? The DOD is also the US government’s largest fuel user and perhaps the world’s largest institutional greenhouse gas emitter — with annual emissions larger than the annual emissions of many countries. Tracking the causes and trends DOD fuel use from 1975 to 2018 and linking it to military doctrine shows a strategic disconnect: the Pentagon’s fuel use and military doctrine undermines its security objectives. What explains this? Neta C. Crawford is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Boston University. She is also a co-director of the Costs of War Project based at Brown University and Boston University. Crawford has served on the Governing Council of the American Political Science Association and the editorial board of the American Political Science Review. She is currently on the editorial board of Journal of Political Philosophy and Bristol Studies in International Theory. She is the author of more than four dozen academic articles and her books include Argument and Change in World Politics: Ethics, Decolonization and Humanitarian Intervention (Cambridge University Press) and Accountability for Killing: Moral Responsibility for Collateral Damage in America's Post-9/11 Wars (Oxford University Press). Karen E Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). LSE Shape the World Series - to celebrate the completion of LSE’s newest building, a series of public events organised by some of the academic departments who are now housed in the Centre Building will take place this term. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 92nd year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. The twitter hashtag for this event is #PartofLSE


The Implications of Brexit for the UK Economy
Jan 27 2020 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Gerard Lyons, Vicky Pryce, Professor John Van Reenen | This panel discussion will focus on assessing the likely impacts of any Brexit outcome on the UK economy, across sectors and regions. How robust are the economic forecasts? What might change their predictions? Gerard Lyons (@DrGerardLyons) is a leading international economist. He is chief economic strategist at challenger wealth manager Netwealth and on the Board of Bank of China (UK), and is on a number of advisory boards, including Vivid Economics, Warwick Business School and the Grantham Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE and Imperial. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and Professor in Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit



Pulling Away? A Social Analysis of Economic 'Elites' in the UK
Jan 22 2020 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Lee Elliot Major, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Katharina Hecht | This event will launch a report from a research project at the International Inequalities Institute supported by the Sutton Trust to investigate whether British elites are pulling ahead, not just economically but also socially. Economic research has demonstrated that the richest 1 per cent in terms of income in the UK have increased their relative advantage since the 1980s but we know less about whether their social mobility and self-identities are becoming more exclusive and hence whether there is a more general process of ‘elites pulling away’. Lee Elliot Major (@Lem_Exeter) is Professor of Social Mobility, University of Exeter and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Katharina Hecht is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute (III). Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.


Engerland! Rossiya! Hyphenated-phantom-limb Nations on the Edges of Europe
Jan 21 2020 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | How have Britain and Russia dealt with loss of empire and what impact has it had on their self-understanding and politics? Britain and Russia have often been extremely suspicious of each other’s intentions, yet they share some fundamental things in common, beyond an unhealthy preoccupation with secret agents. Some claim that after 60 years Britain has still not adjusted to the post imperial era, and that this is reflected in Brexit - with its inability to accept that Ireland is a separate country, not to mention calls for an ‘Anglosphere’ or Empire 2.0 as an alternative to EU membership. The Russian loss of empire was a much more sudden affair in the early 1990s as 13 states became independent and Russia emerged from the polyglot Soviet carapace. Some claim that Russia is suffering from phantom limb syndrome, with President Putin pillaging the imperial past to create a new Russian identity, which does not mask the failure of his regime to diversify and modernise the Russian economy. The lecture will show how the imperial theme can be used to illumine trends in both societies. Michael Burleigh (@BurlM11) is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIDEAS


How Change Happens
Jan 14 2020 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Cass R. Sunstein | How does social change happen? Why is it so hard to anticipate? A key reason is the existence of hidden preferences, which may or may not be unleashed. Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. His latest book is How Change Happens. To pre-order a copy of How Change Happens, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to How Change Happens. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHowChangeHappens This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at How Change Happens. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Climate Litigation: achievements and challenges
Jan 09 2020 94 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Randall Abate, Dr Emily Barritt, Tessa Khan, Professor Hari Osofsky, Professor Jaqueline Peel, Dr Joana Setzer, Megan Bowman | Climate change litigation continues to expand across jurisdictions as a tool to strengthen climate action. But are courts prepared to protect the rights of future generations, wildlife and natural resources – collectively referred to as “the voiceless” - from the impacts of global climate change? This panel brings together leading scholars and practitioners in the field of climate litigation to discuss the potential and challenges for the law in addressing climate change. Randall Abate is Professor in the Department of Political Science and Sociology, Monmouth University. Emily Barritt (@emilymbarritt) is Lecturer in Tort Law and the Co-Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Kings College London. Megan Bowman is Associate Professor in Law, King’s College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law. Tessa Khan is a lawyer with the Urgenda Foundation and co-founder of the Climate Litigation Network. Hari Osofsky (@HariOsofsky) is Dean of Penn State Law and the Penn State School of International Affairs. Jaqueline Peel is Professor of Law, University of Melbourne. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Research Fellow, Grantham Research Institute, LSE. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.




Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems?
Dec 04 2019 87 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz | We all have the sense that our economy tilts toward big business, but a few corporations have come to dominate entire sectors, contributing to skyrocketing inequality and slow growth. Too many have made their wealth through exploitation of others rather than through wealth creation. Professor Joseph Stiglitz will argue that we need to exploit the benefits of markets while taming their excesses, making sure that markets work for people and not the other way around. Joseph E. Stiglitz (@JosephEStiglitz) is University Professor at Columbia University, the winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics, and a lead author of the 1995 IPCC report, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. At Columbia, Stiglitz co-chairs the Committee on Global Thought and is founder and co-president of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue. His latest book, People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent, was released in April. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to People, Power, and Profits: Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent. Nicholas Stern is Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government at LSE. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. witter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSStiglitz This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Is Progressive Capitalism an Answer to America's Problems? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.


Europe 2020: the European year in review
Dec 03 2019 89 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Swati Dhingra, Dr Spyros Economides, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | 2019 has been a momentous year for Europe, and 2020 promises more of the same. This public discussion will take stock of political, economic, and social events in Europe and the European Union during this past year and try to look forward to the next. Panelists will touch on issues such as the EP and national elections, the new leaders of EU institutions, Brexit, the European economy, Europe’s relationship with the US, and a number of others. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is Associate Professor in Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Academic Director, School of Public Policy, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions, Department of Government, LSE. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope

From 1919 to 2019: pivotal lessons from Versailles
Nov 28 2019 92 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Barry Buzan, Professor Margaret MacMillan, Professor David Stevenson, Professor Linda Yueh | A panel of distinguished scholars will here discuss the legacy of the First World War, the Versailles Peace Treaty which followed, and why the treaty has been so hotly debated ever since by critics and defenders alike. This event will also mark the relaunch of John Maynard Keynes’s justly famous The Economic Consequences of the Peace, first published in December 1919 and now republished with a new, definitive introduction by Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities, and the University of International Relations in Beijing; a Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS; and a Fellow of the British Academy. Margaret MacMillan became the fifth Warden of St Antony’s College in July 2007, and stepped down in October 2017. Prior to taking on the Wardenship, Professor MacMillan was Provost of Trinity College and professor of History at the University of Toronto. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His main fields of interests lie in international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. She is Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School as well as Associate Fellow (Global Economy and Finance Department & U.S. and the Americas Programme) at Chatham House and was Visiting Professor of Economics at Peking University. She is a widely published author and Editor of the Routledge Economic Growth and Development book series. Her latest book, The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today is The Times's Best Business Books of the Year. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVersailles

How Freedom of Choice Influences Well-being
Nov 28 2019 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Simona Botti | Does choice freedom always enhance satisfaction? Lab experiments help tackle this question, but when should they be used and how have techniques evolved over time? Hear from Simona Botti, Professor of Marketing at London Business School, as she explores the pros and cons of using lab experiments to explain human behaviour around decision-making and choice. Laboratory experiments are one of the many tools available to researchers to help them understand the consequences of making free choices. They can be used in isolation, or in combination with other methods. Simona will draw on practical examples from her own research into perceived personal control and choice freedom. She will share some of the lessons she has learned and provide insight into how experimental research has evolved over time. Simona Botti is Professor of Marketing at the London Business School. She joined LBS in 2007 after two years as Assistant Professor of Marketing at the S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University. She received an undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Bocconi University in Milan, Italy, and a MBA and PhD in Marketing from the University of Chicago. Professor Botti’s research focuses on consumer behaviour and decision making, with particular emphasis on the psychological processes underlying perceived personal control and how exercising control (freedom of choice, power, information) influence consumers’ satisfaction and well-being. Her work has been published in leading psychology and consumer behaviour journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Psychological Science. She is Associate Editor at Journal of Consumer Psychology and Journal of Consumer Research. Barbara Fasolo is Associate Professor of Behavioural Science at LSE's Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChoices

Understanding Chilean Unrest: inequalities, social conflict and political change in contemporary Chile
Nov 28 2019 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Emmanuelle Barozet, Dr Diana Kruger | Why has Chile been experiencing its larger protests since the return to democracy? What is behind the demands of its citizens? It’s been just over a month of continuous protests in Chile. What began as a challenge to metro fare hikes has become a general outcry, questioning structural inequalities in Chile. Traditionally perceived as the most stable country in the Latin American region, Chile is now challenging the way its model has worked in the last 40 years. From how education, housing, pensions, or health services operate, to even change the current constitution inherited from Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship (1973-1990). Drawing from the researched done by COES, this discussion will examine the causes and consequences of the recent protests, as well as possible routes ahead. Emmanuelle Barozet is a Full Professor at the University of Chile and Associate Researcher of the COES. Diana Kruger is an Associate Professor at Adolfo Ibañez University and Associate Researcher of the COES. Kirsten Sehnbruch (@KirstenSehn) is British Academy Global Professor and Distinguished Policy Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.





Do Clothes Maketh the Human?
Nov 20 2019 78 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Shahidha Bari, Yashka Moore, Professor Heather Widdows | Does fashion allow us to express our individuality or is it a case of the Emperor’s new clothing? Can we judge a book by its cover or is beauty just another manifestation of sexist and racist ideals? Does is even make sense to think of our judgements about beauty as being ethically right or wrong? Whether you wear your heart on your sleeve for fashion or think beauty should be given the boot, join us to discuss the cultural, political, and philosophical dimensions of fashion and beauty. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Professor of Fashion Cultures, UAL and author of Dressed. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Dressed. Yashka Moore (@YASHKAMOORE) is a fashion designer. Heather Widdows (@ProfWiddows) is John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, University of Birmingham and author of Perfect Me. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Perfect Me. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum



Code and Conduct: the future of legal professions
Nov 13 2019 96 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Andrew Murray, Dr Orla Lynskey, Dr Eva Micheler, Lord Reed & Richard Susskind | Advances in IT have had a significant impact on lawyering and law. How can we harness the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity? In this roundtable discussion, we reflect on information technology’s transformative impact on lawyering and on law. Advances in IT have already had a significant impact on how the legal professions are organised and how justice is dispensed. The rate of change is only likely to increase in the coming decades, potentially transforming the nature of lawyering and of law itself in an irreversible way. This discussion is an opportunity to take stock of past achievements and failures, and to reflect on the fundamental importance of harnessing the transformative power of digitalisation without sacrificing law’s humanity. The discussion will be organised in three themes: IT and transformation of the working environment in legal practice; IT and transformation of adjudicative processes; IT and transformation of access to justice. Christina Blacklaws is the immediate past president of the Law Society and Chair of government technology panels. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. Orla Lynskey (@lynskeyo) is Associate Professor, LSE. Eva Micheler is Associate Professor, LSE. Lord Reed is incoming President of the UK Supreme Court. Richard Susskind (@richardsusskind) is Technology Adviser to the Lord Chief Justice. Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray) is Professor of Law at LSE’s Department of Law. LSE's Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s top law schools. The Department ranked first for research outputs in the UK’s most recent Research Excellence Framework and has consistently been among the top 10 departments to study Law in the world according to the QS World University rankings. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECodeandConduct

Despotic Data: how authoritarian regimes are driving technology and innovation
Nov 13 2019 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Noam Yuchtman | Data has become crucial in the production of our goods and services, particularly when it comes to the production of new technology and innovation such as artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML). Access to data is often a bottleneck in the development of AI and ML. Whilst authoritarian regimes are considered to hinder innovation, they benefit from having access to large amounts of data which in the democratic world depends on strict laws and cultural perceptions around privacy. Hear from Noam Yuchtman, recipient of the British Academy’s Global Professorship and Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE, as he explains the reasons why authoritarian regimes – such as China – are becoming world leaders in technology, innovation and artificial intelligence. Noam Yuchtman is Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy at LSE's Department of Management. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and School Professor, Department of Economics, LSE. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDespoticData This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Mobilising for Sustainable Peace in Afghanistan: a global mothers' campaign
Nov 13 2019 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Sahraa Karimi, Anne-Claire de Liedekerke, Staffan de Mistura, Rahela Sidiqi, Marika Theros | As talks between the US and Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, mothers are mobilising inside and outside the country to hold on to their right to educate their daughters. Sahraa Karimi is a film director living in Afghanistan. She comes from the 2nd generation of refugees who fled Afghanistan for a new life in Iran. Sahraa has received huge acclaim for her fiction feature debut film "Hava, Maryam, Ayesha” that had its world premiere at the recent Venice Film Festival. Shot entirely in Kabul with Afghan actors, the film reflects Karimi’s desire to “go beyond [Western] clichés, and to find new stories, new perspectives” about life as an Afghan woman. Anne-Claire de Liedekerke (@MMM4Mothers) is President of Make Mothers Matter - MMM is an international NGO that believes in the power of mothers to make the world a better place and supports the worldwide campaign in solidarity with Afghan mothers. Staffan de Mistura is Former Under-Secretary-General & UN Special Envoy for Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Lebanon. Rahela Sidiqi (@FarkhundaTrust) is Founding Director of Farkhunda Trust for Afghan Women’s Education. Marika Theros (@meeksas) is Research Fellow at the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, LSE. The Conflict and Civil Society Unit ( @LSE_CCS) builds on the work of the Civil Society and Human Security unit and was renamed in 2017 to reflect the changing focus of the research being undertaken. The core concern of the unit remains the desire to better understand the ways in which ordinary people seek to shape the decisions that affect their lives, with a particular focus on those experiencing conflict, prolonged violence, or war. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMothers




Women vs Capitalism: why we can't have it all in a free market economy
Nov 11 2019 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Vicky Pryce | The free market as we know it cannot produce gender equality. This is the bold but authoritative argument of Vicky Pryce, the government’s former economics chief. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Vicky's recent posts have included: Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting; Director General for Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); and Joint Head of the UK Government Economics Service where she was responsible for evidence based policy and for encouraging measures that promoted greater productivity in the UK economy. She had previously been Partner and Chief Economist at KPMG and earlier held chief economist positions in banking and the oil sector. Vicky co-founded GoodCorporation, a company set up to promote corporate social responsibility. At various stages in her career she has been on the Council of the Royal Economic Society, on the Council of the University of Kent, on the board of trustees at the RSA, on the Court of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a fellow of the Society of Business Economists, on the Executive Committee and the Council of the IFS, an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Visiting Professor at the Cass Business School, a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, Adjunct Professor at Imperial College and Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.

Unbound: how inequality constricts our economy and what we can do about it
Nov 08 2019 84 mins  
Contributor(s): Heather Boushey | Do we have to choose between equality and prosperity? Many think that reducing economic inequality would require such heavy-handed interference with market forces that it would stifle economic growth. Heather Boushey, one of Washington’s most influential economic voices, insists nothing could be further from the truth. Presenting cutting-edge economics with journalistic verve, she shows how rising inequality has become a drag on growth and an impediment to a competitive United States marketplace for employers and employees alike. Boushey makes this case with a clear, accessible tour of the best of contemporary economic research, while also injecting a passion for her subject gained through years of research into the economics of work–life conflict and policy work in the trenches of federal government. Unbound exposes deep problems in the U.S. economy, but its conclusion is optimistic. We can preserve the best of our nation’s economic and political traditions, and improve on them, by pursuing policies that reduce inequality—and by doing so, boost broadly shared economic growth. Heather Boushey (@HBoushey) is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and former Chief Economist on Hillary Clinton’s transition team. She is the author of Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict and coeditor of After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality (both from Harvard). The New York Times has called Boushey one of the “most vibrant voices in the field” and Politico twice named her one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.” Dr Tahnee Ooms (@TahneeOoms) is a researcher at the International Inequalities Institute whose research focusses on how capital incomes feed back into rising overall income and wealth inequality, with a specific focus on the measurement of economic inequality using quantitative methods, and how to shape and communicate findings in a way they can be of practical use for policy and the real world. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.


Good Economics for Hard Times
Nov 05 2019 76 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.

This Is Not Propaganda
Nov 05 2019 85 mins  
Contributor(s): Joanna Kavenna, Dr Martin Moore, Peter Pomerantsev | Post-truth, disinformation, bots, trolls, ISIS, Putin, Trump….we live in a world of media manipulation run amock. To understand the new propaganda, and what to do about it, we need to grasp both the cultural and technological dynamics in play, which is what this panel sets out to do. Peter Pomerantsev, author of This is Not Propaganda – Adventures in the War Against Reality will be joined by Joanna Kavenna, author of new tech-dystopian novel Zed, and Dr Martin Moore of Kings College London, author of Democracy Hacked: How Technology is Destabilising Global Politics, to grapple with both the philosophical and computational dramas of the disinformation age. Joanna Kavenna is a British novelist, essayist and travel writer. She is the author of The Ice Museum, Inglorious (which won the Orange Prize for New Writing), The Birth of Love, Come to the Edge and A Field Guide to Reality. Her writing has appeared in the New Yorker, Guardian, Observer, Telegraph, Spectator, London Review of Books and New York Times and she has held writing fellowships at St Antony's College Oxford and St John's College Cambridge. In 2011 she was named as one of the Telegraph's 20 Writers Under 40 and in 2013 was listed as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. To pre-order a copy of Joanna's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Zed. Martin Moore (@martinjemoore) is Senior Lecturer in Political Communication Education and Director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power at King’s College London. Prior to this he was a Senior Research Fellow in the Policy Institute at King’s. Before joining King’s, Martin was the founding director of the Media Standards Trust (MST), an independent charity dedicated to fostering high standards in the news media, from 2006-2015. During this time the MST won a Prospect Think Tank of the Year Award (2011) and a Knight News Challenge award (2008). He completed his doctorate in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2004, where he subsequently taught undergraduates in history. Before completing his doctorate, Martin spent over a decade working in media and communications – with the BBC, Channel 4, NTL, AT&T and others. Sophia Gaston (@sophgaston) is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs, LSE. She is a social and political researcher, who conducts international projects on public opinion, specialising in both qualitative fieldwork and quantitative analysis. Sophia’s work is especially focused on social and political change, populism, the media and democracy - with a focus on threats to governance in Western nations. She is also an Academic Fellow at the European Policy Centre in Brussels, and the Managing Director of the British Foreign Policy Group. Previously, Sophia was the Director of the Centre for Social and Political Risk, and the Deputy Director and Head of International Research at Demos think tank. She has previously also held research and strategic roles in a range of UK and international NGOs, the civil service, and private sector, including working as a political speechwriter in Premier & Cabinet in Australia. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts.

The Case for the Green New Deal
Nov 04 2019 81 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Ann Pettifor | To protect the systems that sustain life on earth, we need to do more than just reimagine the economy – we have to change everything. From one of the original thinkers of the program that helped ignite the US Green New Deal campaign, Ann Pettifor explains how we can afford what we can do. We have done it before – and can do it again. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the Director of Prime, an Honorary Research Fellow at City University, a Research Associate at SOAS and a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation. Her new book is The Case for the Green New Deal. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Case for the Green New Deal. Sam Fankhauser is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPettifor This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Brexit meets its Halloween? Assessing the Immediate Future for the UK and the EU
Oct 31 2019 79 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Vicky Pryce, Sir Ivan Rogers, Professor Tony Travers | October 31st has been set as the new deadline by which the UK will formally cease being a member of the European Union. By this stage, we may have a new Brexit agreement or a “no-deal”. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Sir Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Professor in European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory, European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit


How to Speak Machine
Oct 30 2019 83 mins  
Contributor(s): John Maeda | From data bias, to political meddling and self-learning algorithms – machines are more powerful than ever in today’s society. But so few of us understand how these systems work. A leading thinker on the crossover between design, technology and business, reveals how essential it is that we educate ourselves about the laws of our digital age, and how to do just that. John Maeda (@johnmaeda) is Chief Experience Officer at Publicis Sapient. An engineer, computer scientist and designer by training, Maeda is also the former president of the Rhode Island School of Design, was Head of Computational Design and Inclusion at Automattic and a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, the venture capitalist firm. His Ted talks on design are hugely popular, and he is the author of the books The Laws of Simplicity and Redesigning Leadership. His new book is How to Speak Machine: Laws of Design for a Computational Age. Dr Carsten Sørensen is an Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems and Innovation at LSE’s Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMaeda This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.


Building a World Fit for Future Generations
Oct 29 2019 112 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón | Around the world we see stark reminders of increasing division within and between nations and a vacuum of moral leadership committed to addressing the root causes of democratic deficits. Join us as we explore how this generation of rising grassroots leaders are tackling our challenges through collective purpose, changing culture and policy, and how leaders from across the generations can support and amplify them. Gro Harlem Brundtland was the first woman Prime Minister of Norway, serving for more than 10 years over three terms until 1996. Following this she was Director-General of the World Health Organization from 1998-2003 and UN Special Envoy on Climate Change from 2007-2010. She is a member of the Elders serving as Deputy Chair from 2013-2018, and is an Honorary Fellow of LSE. Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. Throughout his public sector career, President Santos has held important ministerial roles. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded with the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford.

Imagine All The People: literature, society and cross-national variation in education systems
Oct 28 2019 69 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Cathie-Jo Martin | Cathie-Jo Martin examines differences in literary narratives on education, the individual and society, and its influence on education policy choices in Britain and Denmark. Differences in literary narratives about education, the individual, and society influence education policy choices in Britain and Denmark. British narratives helped to construct an individualistic educational culture (initially for upper- and middle-class youth) by portraying schooling as essential to individual self-development. Re-formers later sought general, rather than vocational, secondary schools to assure equality of educational opportunity across classes. Conversely, Danish narratives nurtured a collectivist educational culture that posited schooling as crucial for building a strong society. Early mass education constituted social investment, and differentiation of secondary education tracks was necessary to meet diverse societal needs. Writers are political agents in this story. They collectively debate is-sues in their works and thereby convey their views to political leaders in predemocratic regimes prior to reform episodes. They rework cultural symbols and themes from an earlier age to address new challenges, and embed assumptions about education, the individual, and society in their stories. Authors’ narratives contribute to cognitive frames about social and economic problems and help other elites to formulate preferences regarding education options. Fiction is particularly well-suited to imbuing issues with emotional salience, as readers are moved by the suffering and triumphs of protagonists in ways that scholarly essays find difficult to achieve. Thus fiction may enhance the emotional commitment to schooling and influence assessments of marginal groups. Writers’ depictions are not deterministic, but like political policy legacies, the cultural touchstones of these created worlds constrain political institutional development. Cathie-Jo Martin is Professor at Boston University and Director, BU Center for the Study of Europe. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics and Research Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIII

Ordinal Citizenship
Oct 25 2019 54 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Marion Fourcade | Join us for the annual British Journal of Sociology Lecture. The expansion of social citizenship in the 20th century mitigated the brute effects of economic inequality in people’s lives. The institutionalization of universal rights and entitlement programs recognised that access to a “civilized” life should not depend on wealth only. Economic and social difference did not disappear—far from it—but it could now legitimate itself through the opportunities offered by, among others, the educational system. The new rights also created new social divisions, however, separating citizens according to their ability to do well through them. In this lecture, Professor Fourcade will explore how these twin dynamics of inclusion and stratification play out in the 21st century. As digital technologies have enabled a broadening of economic and social incorporation, the possibilities for classifying, sorting, slotting and scaling people have also grown and diversified. New ways of measuring and demonstrating merit have sprung up, some better accepted than others. Institutions, both market and state, find themselves compelled to build up and exploit this efficient, proliferating, fine-grained knowledge in order to manage individual claims on resources and opportunities. This process, she argues, creates new social demands for self-care and individual fitness that possibly erode the universal and solidaristic basis upon which the expansion of citizenship historically thrived. Marion Fourcade is Professor of Sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. She received her PhD from Harvard University (2000) and taught at New York University and Princeton University before joining the Berkeley sociology department in 2003. A comparative sociologist by training and taste, she is interested in variations in economic and political knowledge and practice across nations. Her first book, Economists and Societies, explored the distinctive character of the discipline and profession of economics in three countries. A second book, The Ordinal Society (with Kieran Healy), is under contract. This book investigates new forms of social stratification and morality in the digital economy. Other recent research focuses on the valuation of nature in comparative perspective; the moral regulation of states; the comparative study of political organization (with Evan Schofer and Brian Lande); the microsociology of courtroom exchanges (with Roi Livne); the sociology of economics, with Etienne Ollion and Yann Algan, and with Rakesh Khurana; the politics of wine classifications in France and the United States (with Rebecca Elliott and Olivier Jacquet). A final book-length project, Measure for Measure: Social Ontologies of Classification, will examine the cultural and institutional logic of what we may call "national classificatory styles" across a range of empirical domains. Fourcade is also an Associate Fellow of the Max Planck-Sciences Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Societies (Maxpo), and a past President of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (2016). The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJS



30 Years after the fall of the Berlin Wall: German historical memory and national identity
Oct 23 2019 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Hope M Harrison | This public lecture will examine the arc of memory politics in Germany since 1989, including the impact of the rise of the far right as well as German plans for the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall. The history, meaning and legacy of the Berlin Wall remain controversial three decades after its fall. Approaching the 30th anniversary on 9 November, Germans are engaged anew in debates about the history and aftermath of communist East Germany and its Wall. This public lecture will examine the arc of memory politics in Germany since 1989, including the impact of the rise of the far right as well as German plans for the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall. Hope M Harrison is Associate Professor of History and International Affairs at the George Washington University. Her new book is After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present and has been called “a tour de force,” “riveting,” and “superbly informed and often moving”. She is the prize-winning author of Driving the Soviet up the Wall: Soviet-East German Relations, 1953-1961 (2003) and has appeared on the BBC, CNN, and Deutschlandradio. She serves on the board of three institutions in Berlin connected to the Cold War and the Berlin Wall. Roham Alvandi is Associate Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Director of the LSE IDEAS Cold War Studies Project. He is the author of Nixon, Kissinger, and the Shah: The United States and Iran in the Cold War (Oxford University Press, 2014), which was selected by the Financial Times as one of the best history books of 2014. He edited the recent volume The Age of Aryamehr: Late Pahlavi Iran and its Global Entanglements (Gingko Library, 2018). LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. The LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBerlinWall


Capitalism, Alone: the future of the system that rules the world
Oct 23 2019 75 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Branko Milanovic | We are all capitalists now. For the first time in human history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. In his book Capitalism, Alone, which he will discuss in this lecture, economist Branko Milanovic explains the reasons for this decisive historical shift since the days of feudalism and, later, communism. Surveying the varieties of capitalism, he asks: What are the prospects for a fairer world now that capitalism is the only game in town? His conclusions are sobering, but not fatalistic. Branko Milanovic explains how capitalism gets much wrong, but also much right—and it is not going anywhere. Our task is to improve it. Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He will join the International Inequalities Institute at LSE in 2020 as Centennial Professor. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Before Malcolm X - History of Islam in Americas
Oct 22 2019 81 mins  
Contributor(s): Mustafa Briggs, Martha Ojo | Straight from his US tour, Mustafa Briggs will present on the history of Islam in the Americas. Don't miss out on the exclusive and exciting opportunity to learn about black history from a different perspective. Mustafa Briggs' (@MustafaBriggs) profile rose from his ‘Beyond Bilal: Black History in Islam’ lecture series which saw him explore and uncover the deep rooted relationship between Islam and Black History; and the legacy of contemporary African Islamic Scholarship. Mustafa is a graduate of Arabic & International Relations from the University of Westminster whose dissertation focused on Arabic Literature and Literacy in West Africa. Started an MA in Translation at SOAS with a specialisation in Arabic and Islamic Texts, before going onto al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt where he is currently doing another degree in Islamic Studies & Arabic. Martha Ojo is the LSE Student's Union Education Officer (2018-2020). Martha is the Union's authoritative voice on all academic issues and has organised the Black History Month programme. She is a graduate of the Department of International History. Zulum Elumogo is General Secretary of LSE Student's Union and LSE Governor (2018-2020). In his role, Zulum represents students at high level meetings while delivering his own projects and initiatives. These include a Students' Union Fund, LSESU Creative Network and a Graduate Support Fund. The London School of Economics Students' Union (@lsesu) is the representative and campaigning body for students at The London School of Economics and Political Science. LSESU is a not-for-profit organisation run by LSE students, for LSE students. LSESU aims to give students the life-changing experiences. Black History Month is one of the key dates in the Union calendar. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBlackHistory

Ending the US Overdose Crisis: lessons from other times and places
Oct 22 2019 98 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Michel Kazatchkine, Dr Katherine Pettus, Professor Peter Reuter, Denise Tomasini-Joshi | The US is in the midst of a major public health crisis. Tens of thousands of deaths are directly attributable to overdose over the past two decades and no end is in sight. Reeling from the failures of the “war on drugs”, many argue for new approaches grounded more firmly in public health and human centred drug policies. Join some of the world’s leading experts on this topic to learn how the US can learn the lessons of past policy failures and policies that provide greater hope to help end the overdose crisis. Michel Kazatchkine (@Kazatchkine) is Commissioner of the Global Commission on Drug Policy Katherine Pettus (@kpettus) is Advocacy Officer, International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care. Peter Reuter is Professor in the School of Public Policy and the Department of Criminology at the University of Maryland. Denise Tomasini-Joshi (@DMTJoshi) is a division director with the Open Society Public Health Program, where she leads the program’s work on health, law, and equality around the globe. John Collins (@JCollinsIDPU) is Executive Director of the LSE’s International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU). The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. The International Drug Policy Unit (IDPU) is a cross-regional and multidisciplinary project, designed to establish a global centre for excellence in the study of international drug policy.

Can America Still Have a Successful Foreign Policy?
Oct 21 2019 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Stephen M. Walt Professor Stephen M. Walt | Since its victory in the Cold War, U.S. foreign policy has been largely a failure. Neither Republicans nor Democrats seem able to manage world affairs as successfully as they once did. Donald Trump took office pledging to fix the problem and “make America great again,” but his actions as president have done nothing to make Americans or the world either safer or more prosperous. What would a more realistic and successful foreign policy look like, and what needs to change in order to implement it? Stephen M. Walt (@stephenWalt) is the Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, where he served as Master of the Social Science Collegiate Division and Deputy Dean of Social Sciences. He has been a Resident Associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, and he has also served as a consultant for the Institute of Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses, and the National Defense University. He presently serves on the editorial boards of Foreign Policy, Security Studies, International Relations, and Journal of Cold War Studies, and he also serves as Co-Editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, published by Cornell University Press. Additionally, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in May 2005. Professor Walt is the author of The Origins of Alliances (1987), which received the 1988 Edgar S. Furniss National Security Book Award. He is also the author of Revolution and War (1996), Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy (2005), and, with co-author J.J. Mearsheimer, The Israel Lobby (2007). His latest book is The Hell of Good Intentions. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSForeignPol This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Can America Still Have a Successful Foreign Policy? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.

Trading Across the Globe: an analysis of the political economy of China and Europe
Oct 17 2019 90 mins  
Contributor(s): Dr Robert Basedow, Professor DING Chun, Dr Yu Jie, Dr Thomas Sampson | The US-China trade conflict opens new opportunities for the EU to position itself. Should it align itself with the US in forcing China to open up its markets? Or should the EU seek to intensify its economic cooperation with China so as to gain a competitive advantage? How should the EU react to Chinese bilateral agreements with EU-members in the framework of its Silk Road initiative? These and other key trade issues between China and the European Union will be debated during this event, which marks the launch of the new LSE-Fudan Double Degree in the Global Political Economy of China and Europe. Robert Basedow is Assistant Professor in International Political Economy, European Institute, LSE. DING Chun is Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre for European Studies, Fudan University. YU Jie (@Yu_JieC) is Senior Research Fellow on China, Chatham House. Thomas Sampson is Associate Professor of Economics, LSE. Paul De Grauwe (@pdegrauwe) is John Paulson Chair in European Political Economy, European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChina







Parents, Poverty and the State
Oct 10 2019 83 mins  
Contributor(s): Naomi Eisenstadt, Carey Oppenheim, Ryan Shorthouse, Matthew Taylor | What do children need from parents, how is poverty a barrier to meeting needs, and what has Government done – and should do – about it? Naomi Eisenstadt and Carey Oppenheim explore the radical changes in public attitudes and public policy concerning parents and parenting. Drawing on research and their extensive experience of working at senior levels of government, the authors of this new book, Parents, Poverty and the State: 20 Years of Evolving Family Policy, challenge expectations about what parenting policy on its own can deliver. Matthew Taylor (@RSAMatthew) has been Chief Executive of the RSA since November 2006. In July 2017 Matthew published the report ‘Good Work’; an independent review into modern employment, commissioned by the UK Prime Minister. Matthew’s previous roles include Chief Adviser on Political Strategy to the Prime Minister, and Chief Executive of the Institute for Public PolicyResearch (IPPR), the UK’s leading left of centre think tank. Matthew is aregular media performer, having presented several Radio Four documentaries, andis a panellist on the programme Moral Maze. He is Senior Editor of the Thames & Hudson Big Ideas series. Ryan Shorthouse (@RyanShorthouse) is the Founder and Chief Executive of Bright Blue. He founded the organisation in 2010 and finally became the full-time Chief Executive at the start of 2014. Ryan’s research focuses on education and social policy. Many of his policy ideas have been adopted by the UK Government over the past decade. He appears regularly in the national press and broadcast media. John Hills is Chair of CASE John Hills is the 'co-founder and former co-Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. This event is hosted with the support of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and held as part of the launch of the new III research theme Economies of Global Care, led by Professor Beverley Skeggs. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.

Protest and Power: can climate activism save the planet?
Oct 09 2019 88 mins  
Contributor(s): Ed Miliband, James Murray, Farhana Yamin | Can climate activism – from Extinction Rebellion to the school climate strikes – bring about the radical change in government and business that is needed to stop runaway global warming? The Grantham Research Institute hosts a debate about what works in climate politics, and what role street protests can play. Ed Miliband (@Ed_Miliband) is a former leader of the Labour Party and Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. He is MP for Doncaster North and an alumnus of LSE. James Murray (@James_BG) is Founder and Editor-in-Chief of BusinessGreen. Farhana Yamin (@farhanaclimate), international lawyer and environmental activist. Robert Falkner is Research Director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateProtest This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Ending Wars and Making Peace: the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 re-examined
Oct 08 2019 83 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Margaret MacMillan | The Great War of 1914-18 left a shattered Europe and a changed world. Despite a widespread longing for peace and for a new international order, the world was to have a second catastrophic war 20 years later. The peacemakers of 1919 are often blamed for creating the conditions which sent some European nations down the road towards dictatorship and led Europe and the world towards the Second World War. This public lecture will ask why moving from war to peace can be so difficult and examine the particular challenges faced by the peacemakers in 1919. It will ask whether the accepted view, that the peace settlements made then doomed Europe and the world to another war, is a fair one. It will also suggest ways we might learn from the past as we face a turbulent and uncertain present. Margaret MacMillan is Professor of History at the University of Toronto and Emeritus Professor of the University of Oxford. LSE's Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s top law schools. The Department ranked first for research outputs in the UK’s most recent Research Excellence Framework and has consistently been among the top 10 departments to study Law in the world according to the QS World University rankings. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMakingPeace This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

Implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: national action plans and beyond
Oct 03 2019 86 mins  
Contributor(s): Professor Laura J Shepherd | As we approach the 20th anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on ‘women and peace and security’, it is timely to consider the remarkable successes of the policy architecture formalised by the resolution. There are now nine related resolutions drawing attention to various dimensions of gendered power in peace and security processes and institutions; these resolutions form a robust framework for many efforts and initiatives aimed at ameliorating gendered inequalities, exclusions, and harms in conflict-affected settings. The resolutions themselves guide implementation across the UN system and, for implementation at the national and regional levels, states and organisations have devised national and regional ‘action plans’ outlining the priority areas for action under the broad auspices of the ‘Women, Peace and Security agenda’. This talk provides an overview of these mechanisms for implementation and introduces a new database that presents quantitative analysis of the 81 current national action plans to identify trends and emerging issues. Laura J Shepherd (@drljshepherd) is Professor of International Relations at the University of Sydney and Visiting Professor in the LSE Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is an academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists and policy makers to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict affected areas. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.

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